Prayer

Publication Title: 
Stanford Law Review

In this note, Katherine A. White explores the conflict between religious health care providers who provide care in accordance with their religious beliefs and the patients who want access to medical care that these religious providers find objectionable. Specifically, she examines Roman Catholic health care institutions and HMOs that follow the Ethical and Religious Directives for Catholic Health Care Services and considers other religious providers with similar beliefs.

Author(s): 
White, K. A.
Publication Title: 
Social Science & Medicine (1982)

Physicians' religious attributes are unknown, and may affect patient care. The Women Physicians' Health Study (WPHS) is a random sample (n = 4501 respondents, 59% response rate) of US women physicians aged 30-70; the first large, national study of US women physicians. In this study US women physicians were less likely to be Christian than were other Americans (61.2% of women physicians versus 85.1% of the general population), but were more likely to be Jewish (13.2% vs 2.0%), Buddhist (1.4% vs 0.3%), Hindu (3.9% vs 0.4%), or atheist/agnostic (5.9% vs 0.6%).

Author(s): 
Frank, E.
Dell, M. L.
Chopp, R.
Publication Title: 
Profiles in Healthcare Marketing

Daniel Freeman Hospitals in in Los Angeles committed $11.2 million to its community benefits program, which includes charitable care, reimbursement shortfalls, outreach and community service programs. The Catholic hospitals are part of the Carondelet Health System. Their mission follows the example of the Sisters of St. Joseph of Carondelet who, in France in 1600, departed from the cloistered community life to go beyond the convent and care to people in their local communities.

Author(s): 
Rees, T.
Publication Title: 
Annals of Health Law

Professor Singer and Ms. Johnson Lantz provide a cogent overview of Catholic health care in the United States and address the key issues affecting Catholic health care in the coming years. In particular, (1) clarity in canonical and ethical interpretation; (2) industry consolidation; and (3) "next generation" sponsorship and the impact of these issues are discussed in detail. The authors conclude that successful Catholic health care organizations must maintain strong mission and business fundamentals in an increasingly competitive reimbursement and regulatory environment.

Author(s): 
Singer, L. E.
Lantz, E. J.
Publication Title: 
Health Progress (Saint Louis, Mo.)

In November 1998 biologists announced that they had discovered a way to isolate and preserve human stem cells. Since stem cells are capable of developing into any kind of human tissue or organ, this was a great scientific coup. Researchers envision using the cells to replace damaged organs and to restore tissue destroyed by, for example, Parkinson's disease, diabetes, or even Alzheimer's. But, since stem cells are taken from aborted embryonic and fetal tissue or "leftover" in vitro embryos, their use raises large ethical issues.

Author(s): 
Branick, V.
Lysaught, M. T.
Publication Title: 
European Journal of Obstetrics, Gynecology, and Reproductive Biology

CONDENSATION: In the Netherlands, regional variations in trends in infant mortality due to perinatal conditions (1984-1994) exist, which could not be explained by health care characteristics (i.e., place or supervision of delivery and the presence of specialised neonatal care). The only sociodemographic factor that showed a consistent correlation with mortality was the percentage of Roman Catholic inhabitants of a region. OBJECTIVE: To describe and explain regional variations in trends in infant mortality due to perinatal conditions.

Author(s): 
Treurniet, H. F.
Looman, C. W.
van der Maas, P. J.
Mackenbach, J. P.
Publication Title: 
The Milbank Quarterly

For centuries, the Catholic Church has been a major social actor in the provision of health services, particularly health care delivered in hospitals. Through a confluence of powerful environmental forces at the beginning of the twenty-first century, the future of Catholic health care is threatened. Although Catholic hospitals are a separate case of private, nonprofit hospitals, they have experienced environmental pressures to become isomorphic with other hospital ownership types and, on some dimensions, they are equal.

Author(s): 
White, K. R.
Publication Title: 
ANS. Advances in nursing science

Modern historical research of women and nursing has largely neglected the role of religious groups, particularly in the American frontier. The image of women at the end of the 19th century was one of submission to male authority and confinement to the domestic sphere. However, in the pluralistic West, a variety of organized religious women built and administered hospitals, initiated professional nursing, and provided effective health care services.

Author(s): 
Marshall, E. S.
Wall, B. M.
Publication Title: 
Journal of Community Health Nursing

Over the past 15 years, a growing number of nurses have been working with congregations as parish nurses and in other community health nursing roles. The majority of related research has focused on describing nursing activities in congregational settings. This qualitative research study sought to understand the client's experience of receiving nursing care in the context of a congregation. Eleven individuals, who utilized nursing services provided in 2 urban Catholic churches, were interviewed.

Author(s): 
Chase-Ziolek, M.
Gruca, J.
Publication Title: 
Pflege

In 1919, Michael Fischer OSC was appointed to the German charity union "Zentrale des Deutschen Caritasverbandes" (DCV) in Freiburg. He assumed his duties as the acting manager and general secretary for the German catholic union of health institutions "Verband Katholischer Kranken- und Pflegeanstalten". For nearly twenty years, he was involved in expanding and strengthening this specialized organisation.

Author(s): 
Kolling, H.

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