Pregnancy Trimester, First

Publication Title: 
The Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews

BACKGROUND: Nausea and vomiting are the most common symptoms experienced in early pregnancy, with nausea affecting between 70 and 85% of women. About half of pregnant women experience vomiting. OBJECTIVES: To assess the effects of different methods of treating nausea and vomiting in early pregnancy. SEARCH STRATEGY: We searched the Cochrane Pregnancy and Childbirth Group trials register (December 2002) and the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (The Cochrane Library, Issue 4, 2002).

Author(s): 
Jewell, D.
Young, G.
Publication Title: 
Contraception, Fertilité, Sexualité
Author(s): 
Janaud, A.
Publication Title: 
Anesthesiology

BACKGROUND: Anesthetic requirements for inhalational agents are decreased during pregnancy, but there are no data regarding requirements for intravenous agents. The quantal dose-response curves for thiopental were calculated for 70 nonpregnant women having gynecologic surgery and for 70 pregnant women of 7-13 weeks' gestation having elective abortions. METHODS: Groups of 10 patients were given 2, 2.4, 2.8, 3.3, 3.8, 4.5, or 5.3 mg/kg thiopental as a bolus dose during a period of 10 s. Two minutes later, patients were asked to open their eyes as a test for hypnosis.

Author(s): 
Gin, T.
Mainland, P.
Chan, M. T.
Short, T. G.
Publication Title: 
The International Journal of Clinical and Experimental Hypnosis

Several papers of interest for researchers and clinicians have recently appeared in scientific medical literature evaluating hypnosis' efficacy in managing patients' distress and pain during surgical procedures. In this article, following a pilot study, the authors describe the context and standardized induction procedures that they are using in an ongoing clinical trial evaluating the effect of hypnosis on acute pain and anxiety during termination of pregnancy.

Author(s): 
Marc, Isabelle
Rainville, Pierre
Dodin, Sylvie
Publication Title: 
American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology

OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this study was to determine whether hypnotic analgesia can reduce the need for intravenous sedation analgesia without increasing pain and anxiety levels during abortion. STUDY DESIGN: A cohort of 350 women who were scheduled for surgical abortion (< 14 weeks' gestation) were assigned randomly to a standard care group or a group that received a standardized hypnotic analgesia intervention 20 minutes before and throughout the surgical procedure.

Author(s): 
Marc, Isabelle
Rainville, Pierre
Masse, Benoît
Verreault, René
Vaillancourt, Lucie
Vallée, Estelle
Dodin, Sylvie
Publication Title: 
Journal of Women's Health (2002)

OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to assess women's satisfaction with a hypnotic intervention for anxiety and pain management during a pregnancy-terminating procedure. METHODS: Women (N = 350) scheduled for first-trimester surgical abortion were randomly assigned to standard care or to a short, standardized hypno-analgesia intervention before and during the procedure.

Author(s): 
Marc, Isabelle
Rainville, Pierre
Masse, Benoît
Dufresne, Alexandra
Verreault, René
Vaillancourt, Lucie
Dodin, Sylvie
Publication Title: 
The Lancet. Infectious Diseases

BACKGROUND: The effects of malaria and its treatment in the first trimester of pregnancy remain an area of concern. We aimed to assess the outcome of malaria-exposed and malaria-unexposed first-trimester pregnancies of women from the Thai-Burmese border and compare outcomes after chloroquine-based, quinine-based, or artemisinin-based treatments. METHODS: We analysed all antenatal records of women in the first trimester of pregnancy attending Shoklo Malaria Research Unit antenatal clinics from May 12, 1986, to Oct 31, 2010.

Author(s): 
McGready, R.
Lee, S. J.
Wiladphaingern, J.
Ashley, E. A.
Rijken, M. J.
Boel, M.
Simpson, J. A.
Paw, M. K.
Pimanpanarak, M.
Mu, Oh
Singhasivanon, P.
White, N. J.
Nosten, F. H.
Publication Title: 
Malaria Journal

BACKGROUND: There is limited data available regarding safety profile of artemisinins in early pregnancy. They are, therefore, not recommended by WHO as a first-line treatment for malaria in first trimester due to associated embryo-foetal toxicity in animal studies. The study assessed birth outcome among pregnant women inadvertently exposed to artemether-lumefantrine (AL) during first trimester in comparison to those of women exposed to other anti-malarial drugs or no drug at all during the same period of pregnancy.

Author(s): 
Mosha, Dominic
Mazuguni, Festo
Mrema, Sigilbert
Sevene, Esperança
Abdulla, Salim
Genton, Blaise
Publication Title: 
Human Reproduction (Oxford, England)

BACKGROUND: The timing of folic acid supplement usage is critical to preventing pregnancies affected by neural tube defects (NTDs) because the neural tube closes by Day 28 post-conception. We investigated compliance of pregnant women with current folic acid recommendations (400 µg/day from preconception to 12 weeks) in relation to achieving a folate status associated with lowest risk of NTDs.

Author(s): 
McNulty, Breige
Pentieva, Kristina
Marshall, Barry
Ward, Mary
Molloy, Anne M.
Scott, John M.
McNulty, Helene
Publication Title: 
Human Reproduction (Oxford, England)

BACKGROUND: The timing of folic acid supplement usage is critical to preventing pregnancies affected by neural tube defects (NTDs) because the neural tube closes by Day 28 post-conception. We investigated compliance of pregnant women with current folic acid recommendations (400 µg/day from preconception to 12 weeks) in relation to achieving a folate status associated with lowest risk of NTDs.

Author(s): 
McNulty, Breige
Pentieva, Kristina
Marshall, Barry
Ward, Mary
Molloy, Anne M.
Scott, John M.
McNulty, Helene

Pages

Subscribe to RSS - Pregnancy Trimester, First