Problem-Based Learning

Publication Title: 
Academic Medicine: Journal of the Association of American Medical Colleges

PURPOSE: Studies have shown that medical students become more cynical and less altruistic as they advance in training. However, these studies were conducted in traditional medical schools, and many used unvalidated tools. This study examined students' attitudes in a problem-based learning (PBL) curriculum using reliable and valid measures. METHOD: Medical students and PGY-1 residents at Mercer University School of Medicine in Macon, Georgia, completed Wrightsman's Philosophies of Human Natures Scale (PHNS) in 1999 and 2000.

Author(s): 
Roche, W. Patrick
Scheetz, Allison P.
Dane, Francis C.
Parish, David C.
O'Shea, James T.
Publication Title: 
Academic Medicine: Journal of the Association of American Medical Colleges

The authors reframe a curriculum change from a traditional lecture-based to an integrated patient-centered approach as an intervention for changing the culture and hidden curriculum of an institution in ways that promote professionalism. Within this context, the authors articulate some of the inherent process and relational factors brought about by these curricular changes that are essential elements of this intervention process.

Author(s): 
Christianson, Charles E.
McBride, Rosanne B.
Vari, Richard C.
Olson, Linda
Wilson, H. David
Publication Title: 
Nurse Education Today

Care has always been a key element of nursing. This paper presents findings from research on the following issue: What opportunities and limitations do nursing students encounter when learning nursing care? The study has a qualitative design with field methodology and the study of documents. Six nursing students have been closely monitored during their clinical studies in hospitals, nursing homes and home-based nursing. The study shows that nursing students are likely to possess the potential to provide care for sick and unknown people.

Author(s): 
Solvoll, Betty-Ann
Heggen, Kristin M.
Publication Title: 
Midwifery

OBJECTIVE: to explore the motivations and beliefs of commencing midwifery students against a background of high course demand and high student attrition. DESIGN: a qualitative analysis of student reflective essays. SETTING: Melbourne, Australia. PARTICIPANTS: all commencing midwifery students, in 2008, were invited to participate (n = 41). MEASUREMENTS AND FINDINGS: three primary motivations for choosing midwifery were identified, including: notions of altruism (wanting to help), a fascination with pregnancy and birth, and a view of midwifery as a personally satisfying career.

Author(s): 
Carolan, Mary
Kruger, Gina
Publication Title: 
Academic Medicine: Journal of the Association of American Medical Colleges

PURPOSE: To examine the relationship between learner experience in the "hidden curriculum" and student attribution of such experiences to professionalism categories.

Author(s): 
Karnieli-Miller, Orit
Vu, T. Robert
Frankel, Richard M.
Holtman, Matthew C.
Clyman, Stephen G.
Hui, Siu L.
Inui, Thomas S.
Publication Title: 
Journal of Postgraduate Medicine

CONTEXT: There have been significant changes in the past decade in both the curriculum and its delivery, in undergraduate medical education. Many of these changes have been made simultaneously, preventing clear assessment of outcome measures. The move away from a pre-clinical science grounding, to an integrated 'problem-based learning (PBL) approach' has been widespread in many countries across the world. PURPOSE: One effect of these changes has been the way in which clinical skills, in particular history and examination are taught.

Author(s): 
Franklyn-Miller, A. D.
Falvey, E. C.
McCrory, P. R.
Publication Title: 
American Journal of Pharmaceutical Education

OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the impact of an innovative team-taught elective course on second-year (P2) students' knowledge and skills relating to the relationship between aromatherapy and pharmacy. DESIGN: An Aromatherapy Science elective course was offered to P2 students in an accelerated doctor of pharmacy (PharmD) degree program and was designed to provide an elective course experience while focusing on active-learning skills such as group work, student-led presentations, and in-class activities.

Author(s): 
Esposito, Emily R.
Bystrek, Mary V.
Klein, JoAnn S.
Publication Title: 
BMC medical education

BACKGROUND: Training in communication skills for health professionals is important, but there are substantial barriers to individual in-person training for practicing clinicians. We evaluated the feasibility and desirability of on-line training and sought suggestions for future courses.

Author(s): 
Kemper, Kathi J.
Foy, Jane M.
Wissow, Larry
Shore, Steve
Publication Title: 
Medical Teacher

BACKGROUND: Problem-Based Learning (PBL) is a whole-curriculum concept. AIM: This study aimed to compare learning preferences and strategies between physical therapy students taught by PBL and those receiving conventional lectures on massage therapy, trauma physical therapy, and electrotherapy, hydrotherapy, and thermotherapy. METHODS: This quasi-experimental study included 182 male and female students on physical therapy diploma courses at three universities in Andalusia (Spain).

Author(s): 
Castro-Sánchez, Adelaida M.
Aguilar-Ferrándiz, María Encarnación M. E.
Matarán-Peñarrocha, Guillermo A. Ga
Iglesias-Alonso, Alberto A.
Fernández-Fernández, Maria Jesus M. J.
Moreno-Lorenzo, Carmen C.
Publication Title: 
American Journal of Pharmaceutical Education

OBJECTIVE: To implement and evaluate the effectiveness of a pharmacy elective on dietary supplements that emphasized evidence-based care. DESIGN: A 3-credit elective that employed both traditional lectures and a variety of active-learning exercises was implemented. The course introduction provided a background in dietary supplement use and evidence-based medicine principles before addressing dietary supplements by primary indication. ASSESSMENT: Student learning was assessed through quizzes, case assignments, discussion board participation, and completion of a longitudinal group project.

Author(s): 
Bonafede, Machaon
Caron, Whitney
Zeolla, Mario

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