Professional Patient Relationship

Publication Title: 
Christian Bioethics

The human person makes great demands on the physician and calls for unique attention. Hence the doctor-patient relationship calls for the highest ideals of kindness, patience, trustworthiness, generosity and skill. The Catholic physician brings to these demands a specific meaning: ministering to the sick is to see Christ in them and to show Him to them.

Author(s): 
McCormick, Richard A.
Publication Title: 
American Journal of Psychotherapy

The study of sexual boundary violations, through the actual evaluation and treatment of therapists who have engaged in sexual misconduct, reveals that all of us are potentially vulnerable to violations of this nature. A number of lessons can be learned from the detailed examination of these cases. These lessons include the following: (1) There is a difference between the conscious and unconscious intent of the therapist.

Author(s): 
Gabbard, G. O.
Publication Title: 
Journal of Advanced Nursing

Despite enormous progress in the understanding and treatment of disease during the 20th century, the amount of care individuals receive from health professionals is arguably less than in previous decades. Being in the presence of caring people who practised human caring has always been the bedrock of services to individuals who were ill. With the rise of scientific positivism in the mid-19th century, traditional ways of caring for sick people, not susceptible to scientific investigation and intervention, were either abandoned or discouraged.

Author(s): 
Peacock, J. W.
Nolan, P. W.
Publication Title: 
Nursing Ethics

In the West, the term 'tender, loving care' (TLC) has traditionally been used as a defining term that characterizes nursing. When this expression informs practice, it can comfort the human spirit at times of fear and vulnerability. Such notions offer meaning and resonance to the 'lived experience' of giving and receiving care. This suggests that, in a nursing context, TLC is rooted firmly in relationship, that is, the dynamic that exists between carer and cared for.

Author(s): 
Kendrick, Kevin David
Robinson, Simon
Publication Title: 
Nursing Ethics

The aim of this study was to explore the ethical foundations for a caring The analysis is based on the ethics of Paul Ricoeur and deals with questions such as what kind of person the nurse ought to be and how she or he engages in caring conversations with suffering others. According to Ricoeur, ethics (the aim of an accomplished life) has primacy over morality (the articulation of aims in norms). At the ethical level, self-esteem and autonomy were shown to be essential for a person (nurse) to act with respect and responsibility.

Author(s): 
Fredriksson, Lennart
Eriksson, Katie
Publication Title: 
Nursing Ethics

This article is intended to raise the question of whether sacrifice can be regarded stituting a deep ethical structure in the relationship between patient and carer. The significance of sacrifice in a patient-carer relationship cannot, however, be fully understood from the standpoint of the consistently utilitarian ethic that characterizes today's ethical discourse. Deontological ethics, with its universal principles, also does not provide a suitable point of departure.

Author(s): 
Helin, Kaija
Lindstrˆm, Unni A.
Publication Title: 
Journal of Psychosocial Nursing and Mental Health Services

This was the first research study in Canada to explore intimacy boundary violations and sexual misconduct between nurses (both RNs and registered psychiatric nurses) and patients. Using a researcher-generated survey, a total of 923 mental health nurses commented on their sexual attraction to patients, and dating and sexual intercourse patterns with patients. The findings indicated that very few nurses had dated or engaged in sexual intercourse with discharged patients, and the few nurses who had done so tended to be younger men prepared at the registered psychiatric nursing diploma level.

Author(s): 
Campbell, R. Joan
Yonge, Olive
Austin, Wendy
Publication Title: 
Christian Bioethics

The human person makes great demands on the physician and calls for unique attention. Hence the doctor-patient relationship calls for the highest ideals of kindness, patience, trustworthiness, generosity and skill. The Catholic physician brings to these demands a specific meaning: ministering to the sick is to see Christ in them and to show Him to them.

Author(s): 
McCormick, Richard A.
Publication Title: 
Humane Health Care International

Loving kindness (metta), a traditional Buddhist concept, implies acting with compassion toward all sentient beings, with an awareness and appreciation of the natural world. The giving of metta, an integral part of Buddhist medicine, has the potential to enhance modern primary health care. Metta must be given with selflessness (saydana), compassion (karuna), and sympathetic joy (mudita). For the believer, Gautama Siddhartha, the Buddha, is the Supreme Healer. His ancient but timeless message of metta is alive and well today, The Dalai Lama being it key proponent.

Author(s): 
Aung, S. K. H.
Publication Title: 
Journal of Medical Ethics

To omit the word kindness in medical practice and journals, in favour of fashionable notions such as "care" and "skills", is not in patients' interests. Health professionals may come to the view that natural kindness (the same as that found in the world outside medicine), because it is absent by name in medical skills courses' or other official edicts, is somehow unscientific and unworthy of their attention. As lay-people know, it is an essential adjunct to all medical management, sometimes the only one required, and by no means always a time-taking matter.

Author(s): 
Pickering, W. G.

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