Professional Patient Relationship

Publication Title: 
Academic Medicine: Journal of the Association of American Medical Colleges

PURPOSE: To assess a scale that measures professional attitudes and behaviors associated with the medical education and the residency training environment. METHOD: In 1995-96, the authors surveyed medical students and residents from five institutions in the northeast region of the United States. RESULTS: Of 757 distributed questionnaires, 565 were returned (75% response rate). Of those, 529 (94%) were used in the analysis. The mean score for the retained 12 items was 92.9 (SD, 11.9), with higher scores indicating more positive perceptions.

Author(s): 
Arnold, E. L.
Blank, L. L.
Race, K. E.
Cipparrone, N.
Publication Title: 
JONA'S healthcare law, ethics and regulation

A male patient was admitted to the acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) unit for hemodialysis. His history revealed that he was homeless and that he had tested positive for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV+). He also had a history of alcohol and intravenous drug abuse and tuberculosis. Based on the results of a chest X-ray, he was placed in respiratory isolation. During the next few days of his hospitalization, he exhibited nonadherent behavior toward the treatment regime.

Author(s): 
Bosek, M. S.
Burton, L. A.
Savage, T. A.
Publication Title: 
Journal of Medical Ethics

There is a growing belief in the US that medicine is an altruistic profession, and that physicians display altruism in their daily work. We argue that one of the most fundamental features of medical professionalism is a fiduciary responsibility to patients, which implies a duty or obligation to act in patients' best medical interests. The term that best captures this sense of obligation is "beneficence", which contrasts with "altruism" because the latter act is supererogatory and is beyond obligation.

Author(s): 
Glannon, W.
Ross, L. F.
Publication Title: 
Journal of Medical Ethics

The patient-doctor relationship has recently come under intense scrutiny, resulting in a re-evaluation of the basis of that relationship. The papers by Glannon and Ross, and McKay seek to identify the sources of authority in the patient-doctor relationship by evaluating it in terms of the concept of altruism. In this paper I argue that the analysis of Glannon and Ross, and of McKay is unnecessary and that the analysis offered by the latter is also flawed.

Author(s): 
McLean, S. a. M.
Publication Title: 
Journal of Medical Ethics

Supererogation can be distinguished from altruism, in that the former is located in the category of duty but exceeds the strict requirements of duty, whereas altruism belongs to a different moral category from duty. It follows that doctors do not act altruistically in their professional roles. Individual doctors may sometimes show supererogation, but supererogation is not a necessary feature of the medical profession. The aim of medicine is to act in the best interests of patients. This aim involves neither supererogation nor even the moral quality of beneficence.

Author(s): 
Downie, R. S.
Publication Title: 
Boston College Law Review. Boston College. Law School

Organ transplants may offer the best hope of long term survival for individuals afflicted with certain cancers or other debilitating diseases. The hope that a transplant may inspire in an organ recipient should not, however, be the determinative factor when the proposed source of the organ is incompetent. Competent adults are not compelled to act altruistically by undergoing a surgical invasion for the benefit of third parties. Children and mentally incompetent adults should likewise be protected from such compelled altruism.

Author(s): 
Cheyette, C.
Publication Title: 
National Forum

The relationship between physician and patient, as generally delineated by the Hippocratic Oath and the American Medical Association's 1994 Principles of Medical Ethics, is one between a fiduciary and a principal. In such a relationship, the duties of loyalty and trust run from the fiduciary to the principal. The fiduciary (physician) is the person to whom the relevant interests of the principal (patient) are entrusted. It is the medical best interests of the patient, not the physician, that are in trust.

Author(s): 
Perry, C.
Publication Title: 
Annals (Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons of Canada)

BACKGROUND: The discrepancy between the demand for and the supply of physician's services is the result of actions of multiple parties, including physicians. This situation raises ethical challenges for physicians, because it involves the profession's core values. OBJECTIVE: To discuss physicians' ethical obligations regarding the quantity of services that they might provide.

Author(s): 
Kotalik, Jaro F.
Publication Title: 
Nursing Ethics

This article reports a follow-up study of Norwegian nursing students entitled 'The helping motive an important goal for choosing nursing education'. It presents and discusses a significant ambiguity within the altruistic helping motive of 301 nursing students in the light of classical and modern virtue ethics. A quantitative longitudinal survey design was used to study socialization and building professional identity. The follow-up study began after respondents had completed more than two-and-a-half years of the three-year educational programme.

Author(s): 
Rognstad, May-Karin
Nortvedt, Per
Aasland, Olaf
Publication Title: 
The Psychiatric Clinics of North America

The authors maintain that the integration of religion in psychotherapy is, at best, problematic and requires a respect for boundaries, but that the integration of a nonreligious but spiritual psychotherapy consisting of the three elements identified above (attention to the person, not the disease, considering one's work as vocation, and the pursuit of empathic understanding) is a therapeutic necessity and an ethical duty.

Author(s): 
Lomax, James W.
Karff, Rabbi Samuel
McKenny, Gerald P.

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