Prostate-Specific Antigen

Publication Title: 
Zhong Xi Yi Jie He Xue Bao = Journal of Chinese Integrative Medicine

OBJECTIVE: To explore the effect of artesunate (ART) on cell differentiation and cell cycle distribution of the prostate cancer cell line PC-3 in vitro. METHODS: PC-3 cells were cultivated with ART from logarithmic growth phase. After 48-hour treatment, the cell cycles were detected by flow cytometry (FCM), and enzyme linked immunosorbent assay was used to detect the level of prostate specific antigen (PSA) in cell culture supernatant. The change of cellular morphology was observed under a transmission electron microscope (TEM).

Author(s): 
Huang, Xiao-fei
Yuan, Ding
Zhang, Chang-cheng
Zhang, Xiao-peng
Publication Title: 
Cancer Research

An isocaloric low-fat diet has been shown to slow androgen-sensitive Los Angeles Prostate Cancer-4 (LAPC-4) tumor growth in a mouse xenograft model. LAPC-4 cells were injected into male severe combined immunodeficient mice. After palpable tumors developed, the mice were divided into three groups, high-fat intact, high-fat castration, and low-fat castration. Tumor latency (18 versus 9 weeks; P < 0.001) and mouse survival (20.8 +/- 1.3 versus 13 +/- 0.7 weeks; P < 0.01) were significantly longer in the low-fat castration versus high-fat castration group.

Author(s): 
Ngo, Tung H.
Barnard, R. James
Anton, Todd
Tran, Chris
Elashoff, David
Heber, David
Freedland, Stephen J.
Aronson, William J.
Publication Title: 
Cancer Research

Most prostate cancer patients develop androgen-independent recurrent prostate tumors a few years after androgen ablation therapy. No therapy, however, has been shown to substantially extend survival in these patients. Previously, we reported that androgen suppresses the growth of androgen-independent LNCaP prostate tumor cells both in vitro and in vivo. In cell culture, androgen receptor (AR)-rich androgen-independent LNCaP 104-R1 cells adapt to growth suppression by androgen and then their growth is androgen stimulated.

Author(s): 
Chuu, Chih-Pin
Hiipakka, Richard A.
Fukuchi, Junichi
Kokontis, John M.
Liao, Shutsung
Publication Title: 
Complementary Therapies in Medicine

BACKGROUND: Saw palmetto is commonly used by men for lower-urinary tract symptoms. Despite its widespread use, very little is known about the potential toxicity of this dietary supplement. METHODS: The Saw palmetto for Treatment of Enlarged Prostates (STEP) study was a randomized clinical trial performed among 225 men with moderate-to-severe symptoms of benign prostatic hyperplasia, comparing a standardized extract of the saw palmetto berry (160 mg twice daily) with a placebo over a 1-year period.

Author(s): 
Avins, Andrew L.
Bent, Stephen
Staccone, Suzanne
Badua, Evelyn
Padula, Amy
Goldberg, Harley
Neuhaus, John
Hudes, Esther
Shinohara, Katusto
Kane, Christopher
Publication Title: 
The Journal of Steroid Biochemistry and Molecular Biology

Dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) is commonly used as a dietary supplement and may affect prostate pathophysiology when metabolized to androgens and/or estrogens. Human prostate LAPC-4 cancer cells with a wild type androgen receptor (AR) were treated with DHEA, androgens dihydrotestosterone (DHT), T, or R1881), and E2 and assayed for prostate specific antigen (PSA) protein and gene expression. In LAPC-4 monocultures, DHEA and E2 induced little or no increase in PSA protein or mRNA expression compared to androgen-treated cells.

Author(s): 
Arnold, Julia T.
Gray, Nora E.
Jacobowitz, Ketzela
Viswanathan, Lavanya
Cheung, Pui W.
McFann, Kimberly K.
Le, Hanh
Blackman, Marc R.
Publication Title: 
Integrative Cancer Therapies

BACKGROUND: A 6-month pilot intervention trial was conducted to determine whether adoption of a plant-based diet, reinforced by stress reduction, could reduce the rate of prostate-specific antigen (PSA) increase, a marker of disease progression, in asymptomatic, hormonally untreated patients experiencing consistently increasing PSA levels after surgery or radiation.

Author(s): 
Saxe, Gordon A.
Major, Jacqueline M.
Westerberg, Lindsey
Khandrika, Srikrishna
Downs, Tracy M.
Publication Title: 
Cancer Letters

The green tea polyphenol, (-)-epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG), inhibits the development and progression of prostate cancer in TRAMP mice and in men. We examined the effects of EGCG on LNCaP human prostate cancer sublines 104-S, 104-R1 and R1Ad representing different progression stages of prostate cancer. EGCG suppressed cell proliferation, prostate specific antigen (PSA) expression, and AR transcriptional activity in the different LNCaP sublines. Intraperitoneal administration of EGCG also suppressed the growth of relapsing R1Ad tumors and decreased tumor-derived serum PSA.

Author(s): 
Chuu, Chih-Pin
Chen, Rou-Yu
Kokontis, John M.
Hiipakka, Richard A.
Liao, Shutsung
Publication Title: 
Cancer Prevention Research (Philadelphia, Pa.)

Dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) is used as a dietary supplement and can be metabolized to androgens and/or estrogens in the prostate. We investigated the hypothesis that DHEA metabolism may be increased in a reactive prostate stroma environment in the presence of proinflammatory cytokines such as transforming growth factor beta1 (TGFbeta1), and further, whether red clover extract, which contains a variety of compounds including isoflavones, can reverse this effect.

Author(s): 
Gray, Nora E.
Liu, Xunxian
Choi, Renee
Blackman, Marc R.
Arnold, Julia T.
Publication Title: 
The Prostate

BACKGROUND: Prostate cancer (PrCa) risk is positively associated with levels of insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I) and prostate specific antigen (PSA), both androgen receptor (AR) signaling target genes in PrCa cells. Although activated AR is required for androgen-induction of expression of both genes, effects of the IGF-I signaling pathways on the androgen-induction of PSA have not been studied. METHODS: Human prostate stromal and epithelial cancer cells were treated alone or in coculture with steroid hormone and/or inhibitors.

Author(s): 
Liu, Xunxian
Choi, Renee Y.
Jawad, Shayma M.
Arnold, Julia T.
Publication Title: 
Nutrition and Cancer

The efficacy and safety of consuming high-dose isoflavone supplements for prostate cancer is not clear. A double-blind, placebo controlled, randomized trial was conducted in 53 men with prostate cancer enrolled in an active surveillance program. The treatment group consumed a supplement containing 450 mg genistein, 300 mg daidzein, and other isoflavones daily for 6 mo. Prostate-specific antigen (PSA) was measured in both groups at baseline, 3 mo, and 6 mo, and serum concentrations of genistein, daidzein, and equol were assessed at baseline and 6 mo in the treatment group.

Author(s): 
deVere White, Ralph W.
Tsodikov, Alexander
Stapp, Eschelle C.
Soares, Stephanie E.
Fujii, Hajime
Hackman, Robert M.

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