Prostatic Hyperplasia

Publication Title: 
PloS One

PURPOSE: This systematic review and meta-analysis aims to assess the therapeutic and adverse effects of acupuncture for benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) in randomized controlled trials (RCTs). METHODS: We searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) in The Cochrane Library, MEDLINE, EMBASE, the Chinese Biomedical Database, the China National Knowledge Infrastructure, the VIP Database and the Wanfang Database. Parallel-group RCTs of acupuncture for men with symptomatic BPH were included.

Author(s): 
Zhang, Wei
Ma, Liyan
Bauer, Brent A.
Liu, Zhishun
Lu, Yao
Publication Title: 
BMJ open

INTRODUCTION: Benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) is a non-malignant enlargement of the prostate commonly encountered in older men. BPH has been treated with acupuncture inside and outside China, but its effects are uncertain. This review aims to assess the efficacy and safety of acupuncture therapy for BPH.

Author(s): 
Zhang, Wei
Yu, Jinna
Liu, Zhishun
Peng, Weina
Publication Title: 
Clinical Therapeutics

BACKGROUND: Drug treatment can defer surgical intervention in benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH), a common disorder in elderly men, and is widely practiced. Various herbal formulations have been used for the treatment of BPH, but few have been compared with established modern medicines in head-to-head clinical trials. OBJECTIVE: We compared the effectiveness and tolerability of an oral formulation, comprising standardized extracts of Murraya koenigii and Tribulus terrestris leaves being marketed in India under Ayurvedic license, versus tamsulosin in the treatment of symptomatic BPH.

Author(s): 
Sengupta, Gairik
Hazra, Avijit
Kundu, Anup
Ghosh, Anirban
Publication Title: 
Hong Kong Medical Journal = Xianggang Yi Xue Za Zhi / Hong Kong Academy of Medicine

Unorthodox (non-traditional or alternative) medicinal practices have been expanding very rapidly in western countries. Modern physicians, scientists, and non-traditional medicine practitioners now must join forces to promote evidence-based medicine to benefit patients. Green tea extracts are among the most widely used ancient medicinal agents, while androgens are probably the oldest drugs used in a purified form in traditional Chinese medicine.

Author(s): 
Liao, S.
Publication Title: 
The New England Journal of Medicine

BACKGROUND: Saw palmetto is used by over 2 million men in the United States for the treatment of benign prostatic hyperplasia and is commonly recommended as an alternative to drugs approved by the Food and Drug Administration. METHODS: In this double-blind trial, we randomly assigned 225 men over the age of 49 years who had moderate-to-severe symptoms of benign prostatic hyperplasia to one year of treatment with saw palmetto extract (160 mg twice a day) or placebo.

Author(s): 
Bent, Stephen
Kane, Christopher
Shinohara, Katsuto
Neuhaus, John
Hudes, Esther S.
Goldberg, Harley
Avins, Andrew L.
Publication Title: 
Complementary Therapies in Medicine

BACKGROUND: Saw palmetto is commonly used by men for lower-urinary tract symptoms. Despite its widespread use, very little is known about the potential toxicity of this dietary supplement. METHODS: The Saw palmetto for Treatment of Enlarged Prostates (STEP) study was a randomized clinical trial performed among 225 men with moderate-to-severe symptoms of benign prostatic hyperplasia, comparing a standardized extract of the saw palmetto berry (160 mg twice daily) with a placebo over a 1-year period.

Author(s): 
Avins, Andrew L.
Bent, Stephen
Staccone, Suzanne
Badua, Evelyn
Padula, Amy
Goldberg, Harley
Neuhaus, John
Hudes, Esther
Shinohara, Katusto
Kane, Christopher
Publication Title: 
The Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews

BACKGROUND: Benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH), a nonmalignant enlargement of the prostate, can lead to obstructive and irritative lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS). The pharmacologic use of plants and herbs (phytotherapy) for the treatment of LUTS associated with BPH is common. The extract of the berry of the American saw palmetto, or dwarf palm plant, Serenoa repens (also known by its botanical name of Sabal serrulatum), is one of several phytotherapeutic agents available for the treatment of BPH.

Author(s): 
Tacklind, James
MacDonald, Roderick
Rutks, Indy
Wilt, Timothy J.
Publication Title: 
The Urologic Clinics of North America

Prostatitis exists when inflammation of prostatic glands and tissues results from infection or allergy. Gram-positive and negative bacteria cause most prostatic infections, but infections may also be caused by fungi, mycoplasma, viruses, and other nonbacterial infecting agents. Precise diagnostic localization of infection to prostatic glands is accomplished by obtaining divided urinary specimens and prostatic fluid and observing numbers of bacteria (or other infecting agents) present in each specimen.

Author(s): 
Drach, G. W.
Publication Title: 
Andrologia

In this study, 25 men, referred to our clinic for diagnosis and therapy of infertility were included. All had enlarged prostates. They were given 10 sessions of prostatic massage during 3--4 weeks and the fluid expressed was analysed for citric acid. The hypertrophy was seen to recede in almost all cases. Citric acid concentrations fell in only 6/25 cases analysed. In all the others, values did not fall and remained relatively stable. There was no apparent relationship between reduction of prostatic volume and the pattern of citric acid secretion.

Author(s): 
Paz, G. F.
Fainman, N.
Homonnai, Z. T.
Kraicer, P. F.
Publication Title: 
The New England Journal of Medicine

To compare the clinical usefulness of the serum markers prostate-specific antigen (PSA) and prostatic acid phosphatase (PAP), we measured them by radioimmunoassay in 2200 serum samples from 699 patients, 378 of whom had prostatic cancer. PSA was elevated in 122 of 127 patients with newly diagnosed, untreated prostatic cancer, including 7 of 12 patients with unsuspected early disease and all of 115 with more advanced disease. The PSA level increased with advancing clinical stage and was proportional to the estimated volume of the tumor.

Author(s): 
Stamey, T. A.
Yang, N.
Hay, A. R.
McNeal, J. E.
Freiha, F. S.
Redwine, E.

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