Prostatic Neoplasms

Publication Title: 
Medicine and Health, Rhode Island
Author(s): 
Chang, Kevin J.
Woodfield, Courtney A.
Publication Title: 
Free Radical Biology & Medicine

Steroid hormones exhibit diverse biological activities. Despite intensive studies on steroid function at the genomic level, their nongenomic actions remain an enigma. In this study, we investigated the role of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in androgen-stimulated prostate cancer (PCa) cell proliferation. In androgen-treated PCa cells, increased cell growth and ROS production correlated with elevated p66Shc protein, an authentic oxidase. This growth stimulation was blocked by antioxidants.

Author(s): 
Veeramani, Suresh
Chou, Yu-Wei
Lin, Frank C.
Muniyan, Sakthivel
Lin, Fen-Fen
Kumar, Satyendra
Xie, Yan
Lele, Subodh M.
Tu, Yaping
Lin, Ming-Fong
Publication Title: 
Journal of Cellular Biochemistry

Homo sapiens longevity assurance homologue 2 of yeast LAG1 (LASS2), also known as tumor metastasis suppressor gene 1 (TMSG1), is a newly found tumor metastasis suppressor gene in 1999. Preliminary studies showed that it not only suppressed tumor growth but also closely related to tumor metastasis, however, its molecular mechanisms is still unclear.

Author(s): 
Xu, Xiaoyan
You, Jiangfeng
Pei, Fei
Publication Title: 
Biochemical and Biophysical Research Communications

Calcium acts as a second messenger and plays a crucial role in signaling pathways involved in cell proliferation. Recently, calcium channels related to calcium influx into the cytosol of epithelial cells have attracted attention as a cancer therapy target. Of these calcium channels, TRPV6 is overexpressed in prostate cancer and is considered an important molecule in the process of metastasis. However, its exact role and mechanism is unclear. NUMB, well-known tumor suppressor gene, is a novel interacting partner of TRPV6.

Author(s): 
Kim, Sung-Young
Hong, Chansik
Wie, Jinhong
Kim, Euiyong
Kim, Byung Joo
Ha, Kotdaji
Cho, Nam-Hyuk
Kim, In-Gyu
Jeon, Ju-Hong
So, Insuk
Publication Title: 
European Urology

Prostate cancer is currently one of the most common malignancies worldwide. The incidence of prostate cancer has risen dramatically over the last decade, more so than can be explained by increasing longevity. Mortality rates have also risen, though not as dramatically. There is a wide geographic variation in the incidence of clinical prostate cancer, with higher rates in the United States than in China. One risk factor which could explain this variation is the high fat intake associated with a Western diet.

Author(s): 
Dijkman, G. A.
Debruyne, F. M.
Publication Title: 
Urology

Breast and prostate cancer share similar intrinsic and extrinsic risk factors. Based on laboratory, ecologic/international comparison, and case-control studies, the impact of dietary fat or other fat subtypes has been suggested as a potential route to reduce risk. Recent large-scale prospective studies have failed to find an association between fat and breast cancer risk. These studies may provide some insight for researchers examining the relation between fat and prostate cancer.

Author(s): 
Moyad, Mark A.
Publication Title: 
Molecular Nutrition & Food Research

Prostate cancer is the second most common cancer in men worldwide. Despite the global importance of this cancer, until recently little was known about risk factors apart from the well-established factors: age, family history and country of birth. The large worldwide variation in prostate cancer risk and increased risk in migrants moving from low to high risk countries provides strong support for modifiable environmental factors.

Author(s): 
Itsiopoulos, Catherine
Hodge, Allison
Kaimakamis, Mary
Publication Title: 
The Lancet Oncology

BACKGROUND: Telomeres are protective DNA-protein complexes at the end of linear chromosomes that promote chromosomal stability. Telomere shortness in human beings is emerging as a prognostic marker of disease risk, progression, and premature mortality in many types of cancer, including breast, prostate, colorectal, bladder, head and neck, lung, and renal cell. Telomere shortening is counteracted by the cellular enzyme telomerase. Lifestyle factors known to promote cancer and cardiovascular disease might also adversely affect telomerase function.

Author(s): 
Ornish, Dean
Lin, Jue
Daubenmier, Jennifer
Weidner, Gerdi
Epel, Elissa
Kemp, Colleen
Magbanua, Mark Jesus M.
Marlin, Ruth
Yglecias, Loren
Carroll, Peter R.
Blackburn, Elizabeth H.
Publication Title: 
The Lancet Oncology

BACKGROUND: Telomere shortness in human beings is a prognostic marker of ageing, disease, and premature morbidity. We previously found an association between 3 months of comprehensive lifestyle changes and increased telomerase activity in human immune-system cells. We followed up participants to investigate long-term effects. METHODS: This follow-up study compared ten men and 25 external controls who had biopsy-proven low-risk prostate cancer and had chosen to undergo active surveillance.

Author(s): 
Ornish, Dean
Lin, Jue
Chan, June M.
Epel, Elissa
Kemp, Colleen
Weidner, Gerdi
Marlin, Ruth
Frenda, Steven J.
Magbanua, Mark Jesus M.
Daubenmier, Jennifer
Estay, Ivette
Hills, Nancy K.
Chainani-Wu, Nita
Carroll, Peter R.
Blackburn, Elizabeth H.
Publication Title: 
The Lancet Oncology

BACKGROUND: Telomere shortness in human beings is a prognostic marker of ageing, disease, and premature morbidity. We previously found an association between 3 months of comprehensive lifestyle changes and increased telomerase activity in human immune-system cells. We followed up participants to investigate long-term effects. METHODS: This follow-up study compared ten men and 25 external controls who had biopsy-proven low-risk prostate cancer and had chosen to undergo active surveillance.

Author(s): 
Ornish, Dean
Lin, Jue
Chan, June M.
Epel, Elissa
Kemp, Colleen
Weidner, Gerdi
Marlin, Ruth
Frenda, Steven J.
Magbanua, Mark Jesus M.
Daubenmier, Jennifer
Estay, Ivette
Hills, Nancy K.
Chainani-Wu, Nita
Carroll, Peter R.
Blackburn, Elizabeth H.

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