Prostatic Neoplasms

Publication Title: 
The Journal of Biological Chemistry

Artemisinin, a naturally occurring component of Artemisia annua, or sweet wormwood, is a potent anti-malaria compound that has recently been shown to have anti-proliferative effects on a number of human cancer cell types, although little is know about the molecular mechanisms of this response. We have observed that artemisinin treatment triggers a stringent G1 cell cycle arrest of LNCaP (lymph node carcinoma of the prostate) human prostate cancer cells that is accompanied by a rapid down-regulation of CDK2 and CDK4 protein and transcript levels.

Author(s): 
Willoughby, Jamin A.
Sundar, Shyam N.
Cheung, Mark
Tin, Antony S.
Modiano, Jaime
Firestone, Gary L.
Publication Title: 
Anti-Cancer Drugs

Artemisinin is a plant-derived anti-malarial drug that has relatively low toxicity in humans and is activated by heme and/or intracellular iron leading to intracellular free radical formation. Interestingly, artemisinin has displayed anti-cancer activity, with artemisinin dimers being more potent than monomeric artemisinin. Intracellular iron uptake is regulated by the transferrin receptor (TfR), and the activity of artemisinin depends on the availability of iron.

Author(s): 
Morrissey, Colm
Gallis, Byron
Solazzi, Jeffrey W.
Kim, Byung Ju
Gulati, Roman
Vakar-Lopez, Funda
Goodlett, David R.
Vessella, Robert L.
Sasaki, Tomikazu
Publication Title: 
Molecular Cancer Therapeutics

The present study was undertaken to gain insights into the molecular mechanism of cell death (apoptosis) by guggulsterone, a constituent of Ayurvedic medicinal plant Commiphora mukul, using PC-3 human prostate cancer cells as a model. The viability of PC-3 cells, but not a normal prostate epithelial cell line (PrEC), was reduced significantly on treatment with guggulsterone in a concentration-dependent manner.

Author(s): 
Singh, Shivendra V.
Zeng, Yan
Xiao, Dong
Vogel, Victor G.
Nelson, Joel B.
Dhir, Rajiv
Tripathi, Yamini B.
Publication Title: 
Cancer Research

Guggulsterone, a constituent of Indian Ayurvedic medicinal plant Commiphora mukul, causes apoptosis in cancer cells but the sequence of events leading to cell death is poorly understood. We now show that guggulsterone-induced cell death in human prostate cancer cells is caused by reactive oxygen intermediate (ROI)-dependent activation of c-Jun NH(2)-terminal kinase (JNK).

Author(s): 
Singh, Shivendra V.
Choi, Sunga
Zeng, Yan
Hahm, Eun-Ryeong
Xiao, Dong
Publication Title: 
Molecular Cancer Therapeutics

Our previous studies have shown that z-guggulsterone, a constituent of Indian Ayurvedic medicinal plant Commiphora mukul, inhibits the growth of human prostate cancer cells by causing apoptosis. We now report a novel response to z-guggulsterone involving the inhibition of angiogenesis in vitro and in vivo. The z-guggulsterone treatment inhibited capillary-like tube formation (in vitro neovascularization) by human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) and migration by HUVEC and DU145 human prostate cancer cells in a concentration- and time-dependent manner.

Author(s): 
Xiao, Dong
Singh, Shivendra V.
Publication Title: 
Cancer Research

The role of angiogenesis in tumor growth and metastasis is well established. Identification of a small molecule that blocks tumor angiogenesis and is safe and affordable has been a challenge in drug development. In this study, we showed that acetyl-11-keto-beta-boswellic acid (AKBA), an active component from an Ayurvedic medicinal plant (Boswellia serrata), could strongly inhibit tumor angiogenesis. AKBA suppressed tumor growth in the human prostate tumor xenograft mice treated daily (10 mg/kg AKBA) after solid tumors reached approximately 100 mm(3) (n = 5).

Author(s): 
Pang, Xiufeng
Yi, Zhengfang
Zhang, Xiaoli
Sung, Bokyung
Qu, Weijing
Lian, Xiaoyuan
Aggarwal, Bharat B.
Liu, Mingyao
Publication Title: 
Molecular Pharmacology

Gugulipid (GL), extract of Indian Ayurvedic medicinal plant Commiphora mukul, has been used to treat a variety of ailments. We report an anticancer effect and mechanism of GL against human prostate cancer cells. Treatment with GL significantly inhibited the viability of human prostate cancer cell line LNCaP (androgen-dependent) and its androgen-independent variant (C81) with an IC(50) of ∼1 μM (24-h treatment), at pharmacologically relevant concentrations standardized to its major active constituent z-guggulsterone.

Author(s): 
Xiao, Dong
Zeng, Yan
Prakash, Lakshmi
Badmaev, Vladmir
Majeed, Muhammed
Singh, Shivendra V.
Publication Title: 
Cancer Prevention Research (Philadelphia, Pa.)

Prostate cancer remains the second leading cause of cancer deaths among American men. Earlier diagnosis increases survival rate in patients. However, treatments for advanced disease are limited to hormone ablation techniques and palliative care. Thus, new methods of treatment and prevention are necessary for inhibiting disease progression to a hormone refractory state. One of the approaches to control prostate cancer is prevention through diet, which inhibits one or more neoplastic events and reduces the cancer risk.

Author(s): 
Ru, Peng
Steele, Robert
Nerurkar, Pratibha V.
Phillips, Nancy
Ray, Ratna B.
Publication Title: 
Anticancer Research

BACKGROUND: Prostate cancer is one of the most commonly diagnosed solid malignancies among US men. We identified gallic acid (GA) as a major bioactive cytotoxic constituent of a polyherbal Ayurvedic formulation - triphala (TPL). Both TPL and GA were evaluated on (AR)(+) LNCaP prostate cancer and normal epithelial cells. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Total polyphenols in TPL were determined using Folin and Ciocalteu method, followed by GA quantitation by high performance liquid chromatography. Cell toxicity was evaluated by crystal violet after 24, 48, 72 and 96 h.

Author(s): 
Russell, Larry H.
Mazzio, Elizabeth
Badisa, Ramesh B.
Zhu, Zhi-Ping
Agharahimi, Maryam
Millington, Donna J.
Goodman, Carl B.
Publication Title: 
Cancer Prevention Research (Philadelphia, Pa.)

Prostate cancer remains the second leading cause of cancer deaths among American men. Earlier diagnosis increases survival rate in patients. However, treatments for advanced disease are limited to hormone ablation techniques and palliative care. Thus, new methods of treatment and prevention are necessary for inhibiting disease progression to a hormone refractory state. One of the approaches to control prostate cancer is prevention through diet, which inhibits one or more neoplastic events and reduces the cancer risk.

Author(s): 
Ru, Peng
Steele, Robert
Nerurkar, Pratibha V.
Phillips, Nancy
Ray, Ratna B.

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