Protestantism

Publication Title: 
The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition
Author(s): 
Kelly, Caleb J.
Publication Title: 
MMW Fortschritte der Medizin
Publication Title: 
Family Planning Perspectives

A survey of the attitudes and practices of general practitioners in Northern Ireland regarding contraception and abortion was carried out in 1994 and 1995 with a randomized sample of 154 physicians. The vast majority of doctors who received requests for contraceptives from their patients fulfilled those request (94%). Overall, 13% of the doctors said a married patient had requested an abortion in the past three months, and 34% had had a similar request from an unmarried patient.

Author(s): 
Francome, C.
Publication Title: 
Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal

Religious discussion of human organs and tissues has concentrated largely on donation for therapeutic purposes. The retrieval and use of human tissue samples in diagnostic, research, and education contexts have, by contrast, received very little direct theological attention. Initially undertaken at the behest of the National Bioethics Advisory Commission, this essay seeks to explore the theological and religious questions embedded in nontherapeutic use of human tissue.

Author(s): 
Campbell, Courtney S.
Publication Title: 
The journal of pastoral care & counseling: JPCC

The authors reviewed the literature on mental health issues among clergy and other religious professionals, using electronic searches of databases of medical (Medline), nursing (CINAHL), psychology (PsycINFO), religious (ATLA), and sociological research (Sociofile). The existing research indicates the Protestant clergy report higher levels of occupational stress than Catholic priests, brothers, or sisters. Catholic sisters repeatedly reported the lowest work-related stress, whereas women rabbis reported the highest stress levels in various studies.

Author(s): 
Weaver, Andrew J.
Flannelly, Kevin J.
Larson, David B.
Stapleton, Carolyn L.
Koenig, Harold G.
Publication Title: 
Social Science & Medicine (1982)

Since the late 1970s when the first cases of HIV/AIDS were identified in Africa, there has been an upsurge of research on the epidemic. Although religious involvement may be germane to AIDS protective and risk behavior, few of these studies deal with religion and AIDS. This article contributes to the discourse on religion and health in Africa by analysing the interrelationship between religion and AIDS behavior in Ghana, a West African country at the early stages of the AIDS epidemic, and one where religious activities are more pronounced.

Author(s): 
Takyi, Baffour K.
Publication Title: 
The International Journal of Psychiatric Nursing Research

The purpose of this study was to examine the religious belief of the elderly women in Hong Kong and how their life satisfaction and depressive symptoms were related to various dimensions of religiosity. Data based on a community sample of older women (N = 180, mean age = 74.2 years) indicated that majority of them (56.7%) reported beliefs in folk religion and ancestor worship. The Catholics and Buddhists appeared to enjoy a better mental health status than did the Protestants, which seemed to be mediated by better family supports and physical health condition.

Author(s): 
Boey, Kam Weng
Publication Title: 
Social Science & Medicine (1982)

Evidence supporting a relationship between religion and physical health has increased substantially in the recent past. One possible explanation for this relationship that has not received much attention in the literature is that health care utilization may differ by religious involvement or religious denomination. A nationally representative sample of older adults was used to estimate the effects of religious salience and denomination on six different types of preventative health care (i.e.

Author(s): 
Reindl Benjamins, Maureen
Brown, Carolyn
Publication Title: 
Journal of Health Services Research & Policy

OBJECTIVE: There is concern about whether public services in Northern Ireland are equitably targeted across the religious divide. This study investigates whether use of acute hospital inpatient services differs by religious denomination, after adjusting for supply and for identified demographic, morbidity and socio-economic determinants of need for such services. METHODS: Hospital utilisation at small area level was modelled against a wide range of potential health and socioeconomic factors.

Author(s): 
Jamison, Jim
O'Reilly, Dermot
Carr-Hill, Roy
Stevenson, Mike
Publication Title: 
Sociology of Health & Illness

This paper considers the ways in which accounts from Glasgow Catholics diverge from those of Protestants and explores the reasons why people leave jobs, including health grounds. Accounts reveal experiences distinctive to Catholics, of health-threatening stress, obstacles to career progression within (mainly) private-sector organisations, and interactional difficulties which create particular problems for (mainly) middle class men. This narrows the employment options for upwardly mobile Catholics, who may then resort to self-employment or other similarly stressful options.

Author(s): 
Walls, Patricia
Williams, Rory

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