Psychotherapeutic Processes

Publication Title: 
Psychology of Addictive Behaviors: Journal of the Society of Psychologists in Addictive Behaviors

Adolescence is a unique developmental period characterized by major physiological, psychological, social, and brain changes, as well as an increased incidence of maladaptive, addictive behaviors. With the use of MRI techniques, researchers have been able to provide a better understanding of adolescent brain maturation and how neurodevelopment affects cognition and behavior. This review discusses adolescent brain development and its potential influence on psychotherapeutic change.

Author(s): 
Wetherill, Reagan
Tapert, Susan F.
Publication Title: 
Psychiatry

This paper is written from a psychodynamic clinician's perspective, juxtaposing a psychoanalytic-attachment model of depression with recent developments in neuroscience. Three main components of the attachment approach are described: the role of loss, of childhood trauma predisposing to depression in later life, and failure of co-regulation of role of primitive emotions, such as fear, despair, and helplessness. Blatt's distinction between anaclitic and introjective depression is delineated and related to hyper- and de-activation of the attachment dynamic.

Author(s): 
Holmes, Jeremy
Publication Title: 
The Psychoanalytic Quarterly

Adolescent processes are frequently overlooked in the analyses of adults. The author focuses on the importance and meaning of first loves in the lives of adolescents and demonstrates how these prime experiences reverberate in the analyses of adults. She suggests that adolescent experiences cannot simply or usefully be reduced to preoedipal or oedipal meanings. Explanations for the neglect of adolescent phenomena are offered both historically, in terms of Freud's lack of understanding of adolescence, and clinically, in terms of countertransference and transference.

Author(s): 
Kulish, N.
Publication Title: 
The International Journal of Psycho-Analysis

In this paper, the author works with the awareness that perversion is a socially, historically and theologically loaded term, at the same time as it may be the latest frontier in psychoanalysis, both clinically, and in relation to contemporary art and culture which emphasize the perverse.

Author(s): 
Stein, Ruth
Publication Title: 
Psychotherapy (Chicago, Ill.)

Interventions from Functional Analytic Psychotherapy focus on what happens in-session between clients and therapists to create more intense and curative therapeutic relationships. The methods described--being aware of clients' clinically relevant behaviors, being courageous in evoking clinically relevant behaviors, reinforcing improvements with therapeutic love, and using behavioral interpretations to help clients generalize changes to daily life--point to compelling directions in personal growth and change for both clients and therapists.

Author(s): 
Tsai, Mavis
Callaghan, Glenn M.
Kohlenberg, Robert J.
Publication Title: 
Journal of Clinical Psychology

Self-compassion is conceptualized as containing 3 core components: self-kindness versus self-judgment, common humanity versus isolation, and mindfulness versus overidentification, when relating to painful experiences. Research evidence demonstrates that self-compassion is related to psychological flourishing and reduced psychopathology. Mindful Self-Compassion (MSC) is an 8-week training program, meeting 2.5 hours each week, designed to help participants cultivate self-compassion.

Author(s): 
Germer, Christopher K.
Neff, Kristin D.
Publication Title: 
Journal of Clinical Psychology

Gratitude practice can be a catalyzing and relational healing force, often untapped in clinical practice. In this article, we provide an overview of current thinking about gratitude's defining and beneficial properties, followed by a brief review of the research on mental health outcomes that result from gratitude practice. Following an analysis of our case study of the use of gratitude as a psychotherapeutic intervention, we present various self-strategies and techniques for consciously choosing and cultivating gratitude.

Author(s): 
Emmons, Robert A.
Stern, Robin
Publication Title: 
L'Encephale

INTRODUCTION: The therapeutic alliance can be defined as a collaborative relationship between the patient and the practitioner. It represents an essential component of the psychotherapeutic process (Ambresin et al., 2007; Cungi, 2006; Martin et al., 2000). Some authors suggest that a good alliance can have a favorable impact on the therapeutic success (Barber et al., 2000; Hubble, Duncan, & Miller 1999; Horvath & Luborsky, 1993; Horvath & Symonds, 1991).

Author(s): 
Laconi, S.
Cailhol, L.
Pourcel, L.
Thalamas, C.
Lapeyre-Mestre, M.
Chabrol, H.
Publication Title: 
American Journal of Psychotherapy

The article gives an inside look at a case where posttraumatic stress is intertwined with disturbances in object relations and ego-identity. The patient was a victim of a brutal authoritarian father who had abused her sexually. The trauma left her powerless and isolated. The treatment was aimed at enabling the patient to achieve connection and empowerment. Hypnotherapy, psychoanalytic psychotherapy and hypnosis allowed the patient to understand and overcome symptoms and underlying conflicts in the context of the therapeutic relationship.

Author(s): 
Mendelberg, H. E.
Publication Title: 
The American Journal of Clinical Hypnosis

Both Ernest Rossi's ideodynamic accessing model of hypnosis and EMDR are intended to access information stored in the mind-body system. In this paper the author is suggesting that treatment effectiveness can be enhanced by combining these particular models. The similarities and the uniqueness of each method, both theoretically and in terms of the different protocols, are compared to provide a rationale for combining them. Verbatim examples from clinical cases are presented to demonstrate exactly how these models can be usefully combined in clinical practice.

Author(s): 
Bjick, S.

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