Punctures

Publication Title: 
The Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews

BACKGROUND: Needle-related procedures are a common source of pain and distress for children. Several psychological (cognitive-behavioral) interventions to help manage or reduce pain and distress are available; however, a previous comprehensive systematic review of the efficacy of these interventions has not been conducted. OBJECTIVES: To assess the efficacy of cognitive-behavioral psychological interventions for needle-related procedural pain and distress in children and adolescents.

Author(s): 
Uman, L. S.
Chambers, C. T.
McGrath, P. J.
Kisely, S.
Publication Title: 
The Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews

BACKGROUND: This review is an updated version of the original Cochrane review published in Issue 4, 2006. Needle-related procedures are a common source of pain and distress for children. Our previous review on this topic indicated that a number of psychological interventions were efficacious in managing pediatric needle pain, including distraction, hypnosis, and combined cognitive behavioural interventions. Considerable additional research in the area has been published since that time.

Author(s): 
Uman, Lindsay S.
Birnie, Kathryn A.
Noel, Melanie
Parker, Jennifer A.
Chambers, Christine T.
McGrath, Patrick J.
Kisely, Steve R.
Publication Title: 
The Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews

BACKGROUND: Administration of oral sucrose with and without non-nutritive sucking is the most frequently studied non-pharmacological intervention for procedural pain relief in neonates.

Author(s): 
Stevens, Bonnie
Yamada, Janet
Ohlsson, Arne
Haliburton, Sarah
Shorkey, Allyson
Publication Title: 
Oncology Nursing Forum

Although nurses are in a strategic position to use hypnosis to manage a child's cancer pain, many lack the knowledge, the skill, or the exposure to the clinical effectiveness of hypnosis. Hypnosis has been a potent analgesic and anesthetic agent for more than 100 years; it reduces a child's cancer pain and the pain associated with painful procedures. Nurses can use hypnosis to help children diminish pain and cope with lumbar punctures (LPs), bone marrow aspirations (BMAs), and nausea or vomiting from chemotherapy.

Author(s): 
Valente, S. M.
Publication Title: 
The Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews

BACKGROUND: Needle-related procedures are a common source of pain and distress for children. Several psychological (cognitive-behavioral) interventions to help manage or reduce pain and distress are available; however, a previous comprehensive systematic review of the efficacy of these interventions has not been conducted. OBJECTIVES: To assess the efficacy of cognitive-behavioral psychological interventions for needle-related procedural pain and distress in children and adolescents.

Author(s): 
Uman, L. S.
Chambers, C. T.
McGrath, P. J.
Kisely, S.
Publication Title: 
The Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews

BACKGROUND: This review is an updated version of the original Cochrane review published in Issue 4, 2006. Needle-related procedures are a common source of pain and distress for children. Our previous review on this topic indicated that a number of psychological interventions were efficacious in managing pediatric needle pain, including distraction, hypnosis, and combined cognitive behavioural interventions. Considerable additional research in the area has been published since that time.

Author(s): 
Uman, Lindsay S.
Birnie, Kathryn A.
Noel, Melanie
Parker, Jennifer A.
Chambers, Christine T.
McGrath, Patrick J.
Kisely, Steve R.
Publication Title: 
Journal of Immunology (Baltimore, Md.: 1950)

We examined the effect of modulating phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) activity in a murine model of cecal ligation and puncture-induced polymicrobial sepsis. Inhibition of PI3K activity with wortmannin increased serum cytokine levels and decreased survival time in septic mice. We have reported that an immunomodulator, glucan phosphate, induces protection in murine polymicrobial sepsis. We observed that glucan stimulated tissue PI3K activity, which positively correlated with increased survival in septic mice.

Author(s): 
Williams, David L.
Li, Chuanfu
Ha, Tuanzhu
Ozment-Skelton, Tammy
Kalbfleisch, John H.
Preiszner, Johanna
Brooks, Lynne
Breuel, Kevin
Schweitzer, John B.
Publication Title: 
Shock (Augusta, Ga.)

Strategies are needed to reverse the immune cell hyporesponsiveness and prevent bacterial overgrowth associated with high mortality rates in septic patients. Adenosine signaling may be mediating immunosuppressive signals within the inflammatory microenvironment that are safeguarding bacteria by rendering immune cells hyporesponsive. We examined A2A adenosine receptor (A2AR)-mediated immune responses in a chronic model of cecal ligation and puncture (CLP)-induced sepsis using both wild-type (WT) and A2AR knockout (KO) mice.

Author(s): 
Belikoff, Bryan
Hatfield, Stephen
Sitkovsky, Michail
Remick, Daniel G.
Publication Title: 
Journal of Immunology (Baltimore, Md.: 1950)

Antimicrobial treatment strategies must improve to reduce the high mortality rates in septic patients. In noninfectious models of acute inflammation, activation of A2B adenosine receptors (A2BR) in extracellular adenosine-rich microenvironments causes immunosuppression. We examined A2BR in antibacterial responses in the cecal ligation and puncture (CLP) model of sepsis. Antagonism of A2BR significantly increased survival, enhanced bacterial phagocytosis, and decreased IL-6 and MIP-2 (a CXC chemokine) levels after CLP in outbred (ICR/CD-1) mice.

Author(s): 
Belikoff, Bryan G.
Hatfield, Stephen
Georgiev, Peter
Ohta, Akio
Lukashev, Dmitriy
Buras, Jon A.
Remick, Daniel G.
Sitkovsky, Michail
Publication Title: 
Human Brain Mapping

Autonomic nervous system (ANS) response to acupuncture has been investigated by multiple studies; however, the brain circuitry underlying this response is not well understood. We applied event-related fMRI (er-fMRI) in conjunction with ANS recording (heart rate, HR; skin conductance response, SCR). Brief manual acupuncture stimuli were delivered at acupoints ST36 and SP9, while sham stimuli were delivered at control location, SH1. Acupuncture produced activation in S2, insula, and mid-cingulate cortex, and deactivation in default mode network (DMN) areas.

Author(s): 
Napadow, Vitaly
Lee, Jeungchan
Kim, Jieun
Cina, Stephen
Maeda, Yumi
Barbieri, Riccardo
Harris, Richard E.
Kettner, Norman
Park, Kyungmo

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