Qigong

Publication Title: 
Frontiers in Psychiatry

This review focuses on Meditative Movement (MM) and its effects on anxiety, depression, and other affective states. MM is a term identifying forms of exercise that use movement in conjunction with meditative attention to body sensations, including proprioception, interoception, and kinesthesis. MM includes the traditional Chinese methods of Qigong (Chi Kung) and Taijiquan (Tai Chi), some forms of Yoga, and other Asian practices, as well as Western Somatic practices; however this review focuses primarily on Qigong and Taijiquan.

Author(s): 
Payne, Peter
Crane-Godreau, Mardi A.
Publication Title: 
Seminars in Reproductive Medicine

Male factor is a common cause of infertility and the male partner must be systematically evaluated in the workup of every infertile couple. Various Eastern medical strategies have been tried with variable success. This article describes the clinical effects of Eastern medicine approaches including acupuncture, Chinese herbal medicine, massage, yoga, tai chi, and qi gong, which could improve the sperm parameters and motility, genital inflammatory conditions, as well as immune system disorders, sexual dysfunction, and varicocele.

Author(s): 
Hu, Min
Zhang, Yuehui
Ma, Hongli
Ng, Ernest H. Y.
Wu, Xiao-Ke
Publication Title: 
Current Oncology Reports

Being diagnosed with a life-threatening disease such as cancer and undergoing treatment can cause unwanted distress and interferes with quality of life. Uncontrolled stress can have a negative effect on a number of biological systems and processes leading to negative health outcomes. While some distress is normal, it is not benign and must be addressed, as failure to do so may compromise health and QOL outcomes. We present the evidence for the role of stress in cancer biology and mechanisms demonstrating how distress is associated with worse clinical outcomes.

Author(s): 
Chaoul, Alejandro
Milbury, Kathrin
Sood, Anil K.
Prinsloo, Sarah
Cohen, Lorenzo
Publication Title: 
Psychoneuroendocrinology

OBJECTIVE: To summarise and discuss the association between telomerase activity and psychological stress, mental disorders and lifestyle factors. METHOD: A systematic review was carried out to identify prospective or retrospective studies and interventions published up to June 2015 that reported associations between telomerase activity and psychological stress, mental disorders and lifestyle factors. Electronic data bases of PubMed, ProQuest, CINAHL and Google Scholar were searched.

Author(s): 
Deng, W.
Cheung, S. T.
Tsao, S. W.
Wang, X. M.
Tiwari, A. F. Y.
Publication Title: 
Respiratory Care

BACKGROUND: Meditative movement, such as tai chi, yoga, and qi gong, may benefit people with cystic fibrosis (CF), as a form of gentle exercise incorporating meditation, breathing, and relaxation. Respiratory function is the most common issue in CF. In this systematic review we synthesized the evidence on the effect of meditative movement on respiratory function in patients with CF. METHODS: We searched Chinese and English language databases with terms relating to tai chi/yoga/qi gong, and respiratory function/cough/dyspnea. Articles were screened and selected by 2 researchers.

Author(s): 
Lorenc, Ava B.
Wang, Yuyi
Madge, Susan L.
Hu, Xiaoyang
Mian, Awais M.
Robinson, Nicola
Publication Title: 
The Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews

BACKGROUND: Although people with haematological malignancies have to endure long phases of therapy and immobility which is known to diminish their physical performance level, the advice to rest and avoid intensive exercises is still common practice. This recommendation is partly due to the severe anaemia and thrombocytopenia from which many patients suffer. The inability to perform activities of daily living restricts them, diminishes their quality of life and can influence medical therapy.

Author(s): 
Bergenthal, Nils
Will, Andrea
Streckmann, Fiona
Wolkewitz, Klaus-Dieter
Monsef, Ina
Engert, Andreas
Elter, Thomas
Skoetz, Nicole
Publication Title: 
Respiratory Care

BACKGROUND: Meditative movement, such as tai chi, yoga, and qi gong, may benefit people with cystic fibrosis (CF), as a form of gentle exercise incorporating meditation, breathing, and relaxation. Respiratory function is the most common issue in CF. In this systematic review we synthesized the evidence on the effect of meditative movement on respiratory function in patients with CF. METHODS: We searched Chinese and English language databases with terms relating to tai chi/yoga/qi gong, and respiratory function/cough/dyspnea. Articles were screened and selected by 2 researchers.

Author(s): 
Lorenc, Ava B.
Wang, Yuyi
Madge, Susan L.
Hu, Xiaoyang
Mian, Awais M.
Robinson, Nicola
Publication Title: 
Current Oncology Reports

Being diagnosed with a life-threatening disease such as cancer and undergoing treatment can cause unwanted distress and interferes with quality of life. Uncontrolled stress can have a negative effect on a number of biological systems and processes leading to negative health outcomes. While some distress is normal, it is not benign and must be addressed, as failure to do so may compromise health and QOL outcomes. We present the evidence for the role of stress in cancer biology and mechanisms demonstrating how distress is associated with worse clinical outcomes.

Author(s): 
Chaoul, Alejandro
Milbury, Kathrin
Sood, Anil K.
Prinsloo, Sarah
Cohen, Lorenzo
Publication Title: 
Supportive Care in Cancer: Official Journal of the Multinational Association of Supportive Care in Cancer

PURPOSE: This review (a) assesses the strength of evidence addressing Qigong therapy in supportive cancer care and (b) provides insights for definition of effective Qigong therapy in supportive cancer care. METHODS: This mixed-methods study includes (a) a systematic review of randomized clinical trials (RCTs) following PRISMA guidelines and (b) a constant-comparative qualitative analysis of effective intervention protocols. RESULTS: Eleven published randomized clinical trials were reviewed. A total of 831 individuals were studied.

Author(s): 
Klein, P. J.
Schneider, Roger
Rhoads, C. J.
Publication Title: 
Psychoneuroendocrinology

OBJECTIVE: To summarise and discuss the association between telomerase activity and psychological stress, mental disorders and lifestyle factors. METHOD: A systematic review was carried out to identify prospective or retrospective studies and interventions published up to June 2015 that reported associations between telomerase activity and psychological stress, mental disorders and lifestyle factors. Electronic data bases of PubMed, ProQuest, CINAHL and Google Scholar were searched.

Author(s): 
Deng, W.
Cheung, S. T.
Tsao, S. W.
Wang, X. M.
Tiwari, A. F. Y.

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