Rats, Inbred Lew

Publication Title: 
Aruk?ru Kenky? to Yakubutsu Izon = Japanese Journal of Alcohol Studies & Drug Dependence

It is known that prostaglandin synthetase inhibitors (PGSI) inhibit ethanol (EtOH)-induced sleep in mice, and that EtOH increases production of prostaglandins (PGs). EtOH hypnosis and effects of prostaglandins on EtOH-induced sleeping in inbred rats were examined. The EtOH (3 g/kg, i.p.)-induced sleep time was significantly longer in Fischer 344 (F344) than in Lewis (LEW); blood EtOH concentrations (BAC) on awaking were significantly lower in F344 than in LEW.

Author(s): 
Suzuki, T.
Shiozaki, Y.
Misawa, M.
Publication Title: 
Journal of Neuroimmunology

By producing brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), astrocytes play a role in disease resistance. This study was undertaken to investigate whether primary astrocytes derived from LEW/N and F344/N rats differentially express BDNF. LEW/N astrocytes expressed more BDNF mRNA and protein than F344/N astrocytes in basal and valproic acid (VPA)-stimulated conditions. VPA suppresses HDAC enzyme activity without affecting HDAC gene and protein expression in astrocytes of both strains. Blockade of TrkB receptors resulted in similar fold decreases in basal BDNF mRNA levels between two strains.

Author(s): 
Wei, Rongtai
Lin, Chiao-Mei
Tu, Yu-Ying
Publication Title: 
Journal of Natural Products

Ginger (Zingiber officinale) supplements are being promoted for arthritis treatment in western societies on the basis of ginger's traditional use as an anti-inflammatory in Chinese and Ayurvedic medicine. However, scientific evidence of ginger's antiarthritic effects is sparse, and its bioactive joint-protective components have not been identified.

Author(s): 
Funk, Janet L.
Frye, Jennifer B.
Oyarzo, Janice N.
Timmermann, Barbara N.
Publication Title: 
Journal of Natural Products

Ginger (Zingiber officinale) supplements are being promoted for arthritis treatment in western societies on the basis of ginger's traditional use as an anti-inflammatory in Chinese and Ayurvedic medicine. However, scientific evidence of ginger's antiarthritic effects is sparse, and its bioactive joint-protective components have not been identified.

Author(s): 
Funk, Janet L.
Frye, Jennifer B.
Oyarzo, Janice N.
Timmermann, Barbara N.
Publication Title: 
Arthritis and Rheumatism

OBJECTIVE: Scientific evidence is lacking for the antiarthritic efficacy of turmeric dietary supplements that are being promoted for arthritis treatment. Therefore, we undertook studies to determine the antiarthritic efficacy and mechanism of action of a well-characterized turmeric extract using an animal model of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). METHODS: The composition of commercial turmeric dietary supplements was determined by high-performance liquid chromatography.

Author(s): 
Funk, Janet L.
Frye, Jennifer B.
Oyarzo, Janice N.
Kuscuoglu, Nesrin
Wilson, Jonathan
McCaffrey, Gwen
Stafford, Gregory
Chen, Guanjie
Lantz, R. Clark
Jolad, Shivanand D.
Sólyom, Aniko M.
Kiela, Pawel R.
Timmermann, Barbara N.
Publication Title: 
Arthritis Research & Therapy

Complementary and alternative medicine products are increasingly being used for the treatment of autoimmune diseases. However, the mechanisms of action of these agents are not fully defined. Using the rat adjuvant arthritis (AA) model of human rheumatoid arthritis, we determined whether the ethanol extract of Celastrus aculeatus Merr. (Celastrus), a Chinese herb, can down-modulate the severity of AA, and also examined the Celastrus-induced changes in immune responses to the disease-related antigen mycobacterial heat-shock protein 65 (Bhsp65).

Author(s): 
Tong, Li
Moudgil, Kamal D.
Publication Title: 
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America

Regulation of IL-6 transsignaling by the administration of soluble gp130 (sgp130) receptor to capture the IL-6/soluble IL-6R complex has shown promise for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). However, enhancing endogenous sgp130 via alternative splicing of the gp130 gene has not yet been tested. We found that epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG), an anti-inflammatory compound found in green tea, inhibits IL-1beta-induced IL-6 production and transsignaling in RA synovial fibroblasts by inducing alternative splicing of gp130 mRNA, resulting in enhanced sgp130 production.

Author(s): 
Ahmed, Salahuddin
Marotte, Hubert
Kwan, Kevin
Ruth, Jeffrey H.
Campbell, Phillip L.
Rabquer, Bradley J.
Pakozdi, Angela
Koch, Alisa E.
Publication Title: 
The Journal of Nutrition

Green tea, a product of the dried leaves of Camellia sinensis, is the most widely consumed beverage in the world. The polyphenolic compounds from green tea (PGT) possess antiinflammatory properties. We investigated whether PGT can afford protection against autoimmune arthritis and also examined the immunological basis of this effect using the rat adjuvant arthritis (AA) model of human rheumatoid arthritis (RA).

Author(s): 
Kim, Hong Ro
Rajaiah, Rajesh
Wu, Qing-Li
Satpute, Shailesh R.
Tan, Ming T.
Simon, James E.
Berman, Brian M.
Moudgil, Kamal D.
Publication Title: 
Journal of Ethnopharmacology

ETHNOPHARMACOLOGICAL RELEVANCE: The herbal formula Huo Luo Xiao Ling Dan (HLXL) and its modifications have been used in traditional Chinese medicine for about one hundred years to alleviate pain and inflammation. AIM: To investigate the effects of HLXL on complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA)-induced multiple-joint arthritis in rats. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Male Lewis rats, 190-210 g, were immunized subcutaneously at the base of the tail with 200 microl of heat-killed Mycobacterium tuberculosis in mineral oil (5 mg/ml).

Author(s): 
Zhang, Rui-Xin
Fan, Arthur Yin
Zhou, An-nan
Moudgil, Kamal D.
Ma, Zhong-Ze
Lee, David Yue-Wei
Fong, Harry H. S.
Berman, Brian M.
Lao, Lixing
Publication Title: 
Journal of Natural Products

Ginger (Zingiber officinale) supplements are being promoted for arthritis treatment in western societies on the basis of ginger's traditional use as an anti-inflammatory in Chinese and Ayurvedic medicine. However, scientific evidence of ginger's antiarthritic effects is sparse, and its bioactive joint-protective components have not been identified.

Author(s): 
Funk, Janet L.
Frye, Jennifer B.
Oyarzo, Janice N.
Timmermann, Barbara N.

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