Receptors, Cannabinoid

Publication Title: 
PloS One

BACKGROUND: The "classic" endocannabinoid (eCB) system includes the cannabinoid receptors CB1 and CB2, the eCB ligands anandamide (AEA) and 2-arachidonoylglycerol (2-AG), and their metabolic enzymes. An emerging literature documents the "eCB deficiency syndrome" as an etiology in migraine, fibromyalgia, irritable bowel syndrome, psychological disorders, and other conditions. We performed a systematic review of clinical interventions that enhance the eCB system--ways to upregulate cannabinoid receptors, increase ligand synthesis, or inhibit ligand degradation.

Author(s): 
McPartland, John M.
Guy, Geoffrey W.
Di Marzo, Vincenzo
Publication Title: 
Molecular Pharmacology

Immune-mediated liver diseases including autoimmune and viral hepatitis are a major health problem worldwide. Natural cannabinoids such as Delta(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) effectively modulate immune cell function, and they have shown therapeutic potential in treating inflammatory diseases. We investigated the effects of THC in a murine model of concanavalin A (ConA)-induced hepatitis. Intraperitoneal administration of THC after ConA challenge inhibited hepatitis as shown by significant decrease in liver enzymes and reduced liver tissue injury.

Author(s): 
Hegde, Venkatesh L.
Hegde, Shweta
Cravatt, Benjamin F.
Hofseth, Lorne J.
Nagarkatti, Mitzi
Nagarkatti, Prakash S.
Publication Title: 
Pharmacological Research: The Official Journal of the Italian Pharmacological Society

Cannabinoid pharmacology has made important advances in recent years after the discovery of the cannabinoid receptors. These discoveries have added to our understanding of exogenous and endogenous cannabinoid signaling along with exploring the various pathways of their biosynthesis, molecular structure, inactivation, and anatomical distribution of their receptors throughout the body. The endocannabinoid system is involved in immunoregulation and neuroprotection.

Author(s): 
Pandey, Rupal
Mousawy, Khalida
Nagarkatti, Mitzi
Nagarkatti, Prakash
Publication Title: 
Future Medicinal Chemistry

Cannabinoids are a group of compounds that mediate their effects through cannabinoid receptors. The discovery of Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) as the major psychoactive principle in marijuana, as well as the identification of cannabinoid receptors and their endogenous ligands, has led to a significant growth in research aimed at understanding the physiological functions of cannabinoids. Cannabinoid receptors include CB1, which is predominantly expressed in the brain, and CB2, which is primarily found on the cells of the immune system.

Author(s): 
Nagarkatti, Prakash
Pandey, Rupal
Rieder, Sadiye Amcaoglu
Hegde, Venkatesh L.
Nagarkatti, Mitzi
Publication Title: 
The Journal of Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics

Allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) is widely used to treat patients with life-threatening malignant and nonmalignant hematological diseases. However, allogeneic HCT often is accompanied by severe and lethal complications from graft-versus-host disease (GVHD), in which activated donor T cells recognize histocompatibility antigenic mismatches and cause significant toxicity in the recipient. In the current study, we tested the hypothesis that activation of cannabinoid receptors on donor-derived T cells may prevent GVHD.

Author(s): 
Pandey, Rupal
Hegde, Venkatesh L.
Nagarkatti, Mitzi
Nagarkatti, Prakash S.
Publication Title: 
The Journal of Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics

Marijuana abuse is very prominent among pregnant women. Although marijuana cannabinoids have been shown to exert immunosuppression in adults, virtually nothing is known about the effects of marijuana use during pregnancy on the developing immune system of the fetus and during postnatal life. We noted that murine fetal thymus expressed high levels of the cannabinoid receptors CB1 and CB2.

Author(s): 
Lombard, Catherine
Hegde, Venkatesh L.
Nagarkatti, Mitzi
Nagarkatti, Prakash S.
Publication Title: 
American Journal of Therapeutics

For thousands of years, physicians and their patients employed cannabis as a therapeutic agent. Despite this extensive historical usage, in the Western world, cannabis fell into disfavor among medical professionals because the technology available in the 1800s and early 1900s did not permit reliable, standardized preparations to be developed.

Author(s): 
McCarberg, Bill H.
Barkin, Robert L.
Publication Title: 
British Journal of Pharmacology

The cannabis plant (Cannabis sativa) has been known by many names but the question remains 'Can we call it medicine?' There has been renewed interest in the value of cannabis for the control of neuroinflammatory conditions such as multiple sclerosis, where it has been shown to have some effect on spasticity and pain both experimentally and in clinical trials in humans.

Author(s): 
Baker, D.
Jackson, S. J.
Pryce, G.
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