Receptors, Cytoplasmic and Nuclear

Publication Title: 
Nature

Calorie restriction extends lifespan in organisms ranging from yeast to mammals. In yeast, the SIR2 gene mediates the life-extending effects of calorie restriction. Here we show that the mammalian SIR2 orthologue, Sirt1 (sirtuin 1), activates a critical component of calorie restriction in mammals; that is, fat mobilization in white adipocytes. Upon food withdrawal Sirt1 protein binds to and represses genes controlled by the fat regulator PPAR-gamma (peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma), including genes mediating fat storage.

Author(s): 
Picard, FrÈdÈric
Kurtev, Martin
Chung, Namjin
Topark-Ngarm, Acharawan
Senawong, Thanaset
Machado De Oliveira, Rita
Leid, Mark
McBurney, Michael W.
Guarente, Leonard
Publication Title: 
Experimental Gerontology

The purpose of this brief review is to highlight some of the more important advances in endocrinology of aging research over the past year. Four advances were chosen and briefly described.

Author(s): 
Bellino, Francis L.
Publication Title: 
Rejuvenation Research

Bile acids are detergent molecules derived from cholesterol in the liver that are important for the metabolism and absorption of lipids in the intestine. Bile acids are also steroid hormones activating specific nuclear receptors and G protein-coupled receptors. Conjugated bile acids are cytoprotective and anticarcinogenic. Bile acid synthesis and bile flow decreases markedly during aging.

Author(s): 
Kr¯ll, Jens
Publication Title: 
Nature

Calorie restriction extends lifespan in organisms ranging from yeast to mammals. In yeast, the SIR2 gene mediates the life-extending effects of calorie restriction. Here we show that the mammalian SIR2 orthologue, Sirt1 (sirtuin 1), activates a critical component of calorie restriction in mammals; that is, fat mobilization in white adipocytes. Upon food withdrawal Sirt1 protein binds to and represses genes controlled by the fat regulator PPAR-gamma (peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma), including genes mediating fat storage.

Author(s): 
Picard, FrÈdÈric
Kurtev, Martin
Chung, Namjin
Topark-Ngarm, Acharawan
Senawong, Thanaset
Machado De Oliveira, Rita
Leid, Mark
McBurney, Michael W.
Guarente, Leonard
Publication Title: 
Science (New York, N.Y.)
Author(s): 
Couzin, Jennifer
Publication Title: 
Aging

SIRT1 is a NAD+-dependent deacetylase implicated in longevity and diverse physiological processes. SIRT1, as a key mediator of beneficial effects of caloric restriction, regulates lipid and glucose metabolism by deacetylating metabolic regulators, as well as histones, in response to nutritional deprivation.

Author(s): 
Lee, Jiyoung
Kemper, Jongsook Kim
Publication Title: 
Cell

Dietary composition has major effects on physiology. Here, we show that developmental rate, reproduction, and lifespan are altered in C.†elegans fed Comamonas DA1877 relative to those fed a standard E.†coli OP50 diet. We identify a set of genes that change in expression in response to this diet and use the promoter of one of these (acdh-1) as a dietary sensor. Remarkably, the effects on transcription and†development occur even when Comamonas DA1877 is diluted with another diet, suggesting that Comamonas DA1877 generates a signal that is sensed by the nematode.

Author(s): 
MacNeil, Lesley T.
Watson, Emma
Arda, H. Efsun
Zhu, Lihua Julie
Walhout, Albertha J. M.
Publication Title: 
PLoS genetics

Dietary restriction (DR) extends lifespan in a wide variety of species, yet the underlying mechanisms are not well understood. Here we show that the Caenorhabditis elegans HNF4?-related nuclear hormone receptor NHR-62 is required for metabolic and physiologic responses associated with DR-induced longevity. nhr-62 mediates the longevity of eat-2 mutants, a genetic mimetic of dietary restriction, and blunts the longevity response of DR induced by bacterial food dilution at low nutrient levels.

Author(s): 
Heestand, Bree N.
Shen, Yidong
Liu, Wei
Magner, Daniel B.
Storm, Nadia
Meharg, Caroline
Habermann, Bianca
Antebi, Adam
Publication Title: 
Molecular Pharmacology

Artemisinin drugs are of utmost importance in the treatment of malaria, because they represent the sole class of therapeutically used antimalarial drugs to which malaria parasites have not yet developed resistance. The major disadvantage of these medicines is the comparatively high recrudescence rate, which has been attributed to the remarkable decrease of artemisinin plasma concentrations during multiple dosing. Autoinduction of CYP2B6-mediated metabolism has been implicated as the underlying mechanism. So far, the molecular mechanism of induction by artemisinin has not been resolved.

Author(s): 
Burk, Oliver
Arnold, Katja A.
Nüssler, Andreas K.
Schaeffeler, Elke
Efimova, Ekaterina
Avery, Bonnie A.
Avery, Mitchell A.
Fromm, Martin F.
Eichelbaum, Michel
Publication Title: 
British Journal of Pharmacology

BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Widespread resistance to antimalarial drugs requires combination therapies with increasing risk of pharmacokinetic drug-drug interactions. Here, we explore the capacity of antimalarial drugs to induce drug metabolism via activation of constitutive androstane receptors (CAR) by ligand binding. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH: A total of 21 selected antimalarials and 11 major metabolites were screened for binding to CAR isoforms using cellular and in vitro CAR-coactivator interaction assays, combined with in silico molecular docking.

Author(s): 
Burk, O.
Piedade, R.
Ghebreghiorghis, L.
Fait, J. T.
Nussler, A. K.
Gil, J. P.
Windshügel, B.
Schwab, M.

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