Receptors, Opioid, mu

Publication Title: 
Folia Biologica

Positive evolutionary pressure has apparently preserved the ability to synthesize chemically authentic morphine, albeit in homeopathic concentrations, throughout animal phyla.

Author(s): 
Stefano, G. B.
Ptá?ek, R.
Kuželová, H.
Kream, R. M.
Publication Title: 
PloS One

BACKGROUND: Research suggests that the COMT Val(158)Met, BDNF Val(66)Met and OPRM1 A(118)G polymorphisms moderate the experience of pain. In order to obtain experimental confirmation and extension of findings, cortical processing of experimentally-induced pain was used. METHOD: A sample of 78 individuals with chronic low back pain complaints and 37 healthy controls underwent EEG registration. Event-Related Potentials were measured in response to electrical nociceptive stimuli and moderation by COMT Val(158)Met, BDNF Val(66)Met and OPRM1 A(118)G polymorphisms was assessed.

Author(s): 
Vossen, Helen
Kenis, Gunter
Rutten, Bart
van Os, Jim
Hermens, Hermie
Lousberg, Richel
Publication Title: 
Journal of Opioid Management

OBJECTIVE: The OPRM1 gene was studied for DNA methylation in opioid dependence and possible paternal contribution to epigenetic inheritance of altered methylation profiles. PARTICIPANTS AND METHODS: DNA was extracted from blood and sperm from 13 male opioid addicts and 21 male control subjects. DNA methylation was determined by pyrosequencing in 24 CpG sites at the OPRM1 promoter region. RESULTS: The authors found significantly increased overall methylation in blood DNA from addicted subjects (Kruskal-Wallis [K-W] p = 0.013).

Author(s): 
Chorbov, Vesselin M.
Todorov, Alexandre A.
Lynskey, Michael T.
Cicero, Theodore J.
Publication Title: 
Pharmacogenomics

Drug addiction continues to be a serious medical and social problem. Vulnerability to develop an addiction to drugs is dependent on genetic, environmental, social and biological factors. In particular, the interactions of environmental and genetic factors indicate the significance of epigenetic mechanisms, which have been found to occur in response to illicit drug use or as underlying factors in chronic substance abuse and relapse. Epigenetics is defined as the heritable and possibly reversible modifications in gene expression that do not involve alterations in the DNA sequence.

Author(s): 
Nielsen, David A.
Utrankar, Amol
Reyes, Jennifer A.
Simons, Daniel D.
Kosten, Thomas R.
Publication Title: 
The Journal of Pediatrics

OBJECTIVE: Neonatal abstinence syndrome (NAS) from in utero opioid exposure is highly variable with genetic factors appearing to play an important role. Epigenetic changes in cytosine:guanine (CpG) dinucleotide methylation can occur after drug exposure and may help to explain NAS variability. We correlated DNA methylation levels in the mu-opioid receptor (OPRM1) promoter in opioid-exposed infants with NAS outcomes. STUDY DESIGN: DNA samples from cord blood or saliva were analyzed for 86 infants who were being treated for NAS according to institutional protocol.

Author(s): 
Wachman, Elisha M.
Hayes, Marie J.
Lester, Barry M.
Terrin, Norma
Brown, Mark S.
Nielsen, David A.
Davis, Jonathan M.
Publication Title: 
Journal of psychiatry & neuroscience: JPN

BACKGROUND: Preference for fatty foods is a risk factor for obesity. It is a complex behaviour that involves the brain reward system and is regulated by genetic and environmental factors, such as the opioid receptor mu-1 gene (OPRM1) and prenatal exposure to maternal cigarette smoking (PEMCS). We examined whether OPRM1 and PEMCS interact in influencing fat intake and whether exposure-associated epigenetic modifications of OPRM1 may mediate this gene-environment interaction.

Author(s): 
Lee, Ken W. K.
Abrahamowicz, Michal
Leonard, Gabriel T.
Richer, Louis
Perron, Michel
Veillette, Suzanne
Reischl, Eva
Bouchard, Luigi
Gaudet, Daniel
Paus, Tomas
Pausova, Zdenka
Publication Title: 
The Journal of Neuroscience: The Official Journal of the Society for Neuroscience

Reductions in pain ratings when administered a placebo with expected analgesic properties have been described and hypothesized to be mediated by the pain-suppressive endogenous opioid system. Using molecular imaging techniques, we directly examined the activity of the endogenous opioid system on mu-opioid receptors in humans in sustained pain with and without the administration of a placebo.

Author(s): 
Zubieta, Jon-Kar
Bueller, Joshua A.
Jackson, Lisa R.
Scott, David J.
Xu, Yanjun
Koeppe, Robert A.
Nichols, Thomas E.
Stohler, Christian S.
Publication Title: 
The Journal of Neuroscience: The Official Journal of the Society for Neuroscience

Prominent interindividual and sex-dependent differences have been described in responses to sustained pain and other stressful stimuli. Variations in mu-opioid receptor-mediated endogenous opioid neurotransmission may underlie some of these processes. We examined both baseline mu-opioid receptor levels and the activation of this neurotransmitter system during sustained pain using positron emission tomography in a sample of young healthy men and women. Women were studied twice, during low and high estrogen states.

Author(s): 
Smith, Yolanda R.
Stohler, Christian S.
Nichols, Thomas E.
Bueller, Joshua A.
Koeppe, Robert A.
Zubieta, Jon-Kar
Publication Title: 
Neuropsychopharmacology: Official Publication of the American College of Neuropsychopharmacology

This is a pilot examination of the hypothesis that some of the effects of smoking cigarettes in humans are mediated through nicotine activation of opioid and dopamine (DA) neurotransmission. Neuroimaging was performed using positron emission tomography and the radiotracers [11C]carfentanil and [11C]raclopride, labeling mu-opioid and DA D2 receptors, respectively. Six healthy male smokers were abstinent overnight. After radiotracer administration, subjects smoked two denicotinized cigarettes, followed 45 min later by two average nicotine cigarettes.

Author(s): 
Scott, David J.
Domino, Edward F.
Heitzeg, Mary M.
Koeppe, Robert A.
Ni, Lisong
Guthrie, Sally
Zubieta, Jon-Kar
Publication Title: 
Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry

Black cohosh is a commonly used botanical dietary supplement for the treatment of climacteric complaints. Because the opiate system in the brain is intimately associated with mood, temperature, and sex hormonal levels, the activity of black cohosh extracts at the human mu opiate receptor (hMOR) expressed in Chinese hamster ovary cells was investigated. The 100% methanol, 75% ethanol, and 40% 2-propanol extracts of black cohosh effectively displaced the specific binding of [3H]DAMGO to hMOR.

Author(s): 
Rhyu, Mee-Ra
Lu, Jian
Webster, Donna E.
Fabricant, Daniel S.
Farnsworth, Norman R.
Wang, Z. Jim

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