Receptors, Somatotropin

Publication Title: 
Gerontology

A recent report of virtually complete protection from diabetes and cancer in a population of people with hereditary dwarfism revived interest in elucidating the relationships between growth, adult body size, age-related disease and longevity. In many species, smaller individuals outlive those that are larger and a similar relationship was shown in studies of various human populations. Adult body size is strongly dependent on the actions of growth hormone (GH) and the absence of GH or GH receptor in mice leads to a remarkable extension of longevity.

Author(s): 
Bartke, Andrzej
Publication Title: 
Endokrynologia Polska

Studies in mutant, gene knock-out and transgenic mice have demonstrated that growth hormone (GH) signalling has a major impact on ageing and longevity. Growth hormone-resistant and GH-deficient animals live much longer than their normal siblings, while transgenic mice overexpressing GH are short lived. Actions of GH in juvenile animals appear to be particularly important for life extension and responsible for various phenotypic characteristics of long-lived hypopituitary mutants.

Author(s): 
Bartke, Andrzej
Westbrook, Reyhan
Sun, Liou
Ratajczak, Mariusz
Publication Title: 
Hormone and Metabolic Research = Hormon- Und Stoffwechselforschung = Hormones Et MÈtabolisme

We examined the effects of diets based on a low isoflavone or a high isoflavone soy protein isolates in normal, growth-hormone receptor knockout and Ames dwarf, and Prop 1 (df) mice that are hypoinsulinemic, insulin-sensitive, and exceptionally long-lived, as well as in growth hormone transgenic mice that are hyperinsulinemic, insulin-resistant, dyslipidemic, and short-lived. Soybean diets tended to normalize plasma cholesterol levels in dwarf and transgenic mice, while low isoflavone diet reduced plasma triglycerides in most of the examined genotypes.

Author(s): 
Bartke, A.
Peluso, M. R.
Moretz, N.
Wright, C.
Bonkowski, M.
Winters, T. A.
Shanahan, M. F.
Kopchick, J. J.
Banz, W. J.
Publication Title: 
Current Topics in Developmental Biology

Ames dwarf mice and Snell dwarf mice lack growth hormone (GH), prolactin (PRL), and thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH), live much longer than their normal siblings, and exhibit many symptoms of delayed aging. "Laron dwarf mice," produced by targeted disruption of the GH receptor/GH-binding protein gene (GHR-KO mice), are GH resistant and also live much longer than normal animals from the same line. Isolated GH deficiency in "little" mice is similarly associated with increased life span, provided that obesity is prevented by reducing fat content in the diet.

Author(s): 
Bartke, Andrzej
Brown-Borg, Holly
Publication Title: 
Gerontology

A recent report of virtually complete protection from diabetes and cancer in a population of people with hereditary dwarfism revived interest in elucidating the relationships between growth, adult body size, age-related disease and longevity. In many species, smaller individuals outlive those that are larger and a similar relationship was shown in studies of various human populations. Adult body size is strongly dependent on the actions of growth hormone (GH) and the absence of GH or GH receptor in mice leads to a remarkable extension of longevity.

Author(s): 
Bartke, Andrzej
Publication Title: 
Endokrynologia Polska

Studies in mutant, gene knock-out and transgenic mice have demonstrated that growth hormone (GH) signalling has a major impact on ageing and longevity. Growth hormone-resistant and GH-deficient animals live much longer than their normal siblings, while transgenic mice overexpressing GH are short lived. Actions of GH in juvenile animals appear to be particularly important for life extension and responsible for various phenotypic characteristics of long-lived hypopituitary mutants.

Author(s): 
Bartke, Andrzej
Westbrook, Reyhan
Sun, Liou
Ratajczak, Mariusz
Publication Title: 
The Journals of Gerontology. Series A, Biological Sciences and Medical Sciences

Mutations causing decreased somatotrophic signaling are known to increase insulin sensitivity and extend life span in mammals. Caloric restriction and every other day (EOD) dietary regimens are associated with similar improvements to insulin signaling and longevity in normal mice; however, these interventions fail to increase insulin sensitivity or life span in growth hormone receptor knockout (GHRKO) mice.

Author(s): 
Westbrook, Reyhan
Bonkowski, Michael S.
Arum, Oge
Strader, April D.
Bartke, Andrzej
Publication Title: 
Aging Cell

The interaction of longevity-conferring genes with longevity-conferring diets is poorly understood. The growth hormone receptor gene-disrupted (GHR-KO) mouse is long lived; and this longevity is not responsive to 30% caloric restriction, in contrast to wild-type animals from the same strain. To determine whether this may have been limited to a particular level of dietary restriction, we subjected GHR-KO mice to a different dietary restriction regimen, an intermittent fasting diet.

Author(s): 
Arum, Oge
Bonkowski, Michael S.
Rocha, Juliana S.
Bartke, Andrzej
Publication Title: 
Experimental Gerontology

Blockade of growth hormone (GH), decreased insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF1) action and increased insulin sensitivity are associated with life extension and an apparent slowing of the aging process. We examined expression of genes involved in insulin action, IR, IRS1, IRS2, IGF1, IGF1R, GLUT4, PPARs and RXRs in the hearts of normal and GHR-/- (KO) mice fed ad libitum or subjected to 30% caloric restriction (CR). CR increased the cardiac expression of IR, IRS1, IGF1, IGF1R and GLUT4 in normal mice and IRS1, GLUT4, PPARalpha and PPARbeta/delta in GHR-KO animals.

Author(s): 
Masternak, Michal M.
Al-Regaiey, Khalid A.
Del Rosario Lim, Marc Michael
Jimenez-Ortega, Vanesa
Panici, Jacob A.
Bonkowski, Michael S.
Kopchick, John J.
Wang, Zhihui
Bartke, Andrzej
Publication Title: 
Aging Cell

The interaction of longevity-conferring genes with longevity-conferring diets is poorly understood. The growth hormone receptor gene-disrupted (GHR-KO) mouse is long lived; and this longevity is not responsive to 30% caloric restriction, in contrast to wild-type animals from the same strain. To determine whether this may have been limited to a particular level of dietary restriction, we subjected GHR-KO mice to a different dietary restriction regimen, an intermittent fasting diet.

Author(s): 
Arum, Oge
Bonkowski, Michael S.
Rocha, Juliana S.
Bartke, Andrzej
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