Recovery of Function

Publication Title: 
Pain Medicine (Malden, Mass.)

CONTEXT: Self-management strategies for pain hold substantial promise as a means of reducing pain and improving function among older adults with chronic pain, but their use in this age group has not been well defined. OBJECTIVE: To review the evidence regarding self-management interventions for pain due to musculoskeletal disorders among older adults.

Author(s): 
Reid, M. Carrington
Papaleontiou, Maria
Ong, Anthony
Breckman, Risa
Wethington, Elaine
Pillemer, Karl
Publication Title: 
The Spine Journal: Official Journal of the North American Spine Society

BACKGROUND CONTEXT: In 2008, the Neck Pain Task Force (NPTF) recommended exercise for the management of neck pain and whiplash-associated disorders (WAD). However, no evidence was available on the effectiveness of exercise for Grade III neck pain or WAD. Moreover, limited evidence was available to contrast the effectiveness of various types of exercises. PURPOSE: To update the findings of the NPTF on the effectiveness of exercise for the management of neck pain and WAD grades I to III. STUDY DESIGN/SETTING: Systematic review and best evidence synthesis.

Author(s): 
Southerst, Danielle
Nordin, Margareta C.
Côté, Pierre
Shearer, Heather M.
Varatharajan, Sharanya
Yu, Hainan
Wong, Jessica J.
Sutton, Deborah A.
Randhawa, Kristi A.
van der Velde, Gabrielle M.
Mior, Silvano A.
Carroll, Linda J.
Jacobs, Craig L.
Taylor-Vaisey, Anne L.
Publication Title: 
Age and Ageing

OBJECTIVE: one-third of community-dwelling older adults fall annually. Exercise that challenges balance is proven to prevent falls. We conducted a systematic review with meta-analysis to determine the impact of yoga-based exercise on balance and physical mobility in people aged 60+ years. METHODS: searches for relevant trials were conducted on the following electronic databases: MEDLINE, EMBASE, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, CINAHL, Allied and Complementary Medicine Database and the Physiotherapy Evidence Database (PEDro) from inception to February 2015.

Author(s): 
Youkhana, Sabrina
Dean, Catherine M.
Wolff, Moa
Sherrington, Catherine
Tiedemann, Anne
Publication Title: 
Musculoskeletal Care

OBJECTIVES: Musculoskeletal conditions (MSCs) are the leading cause of disability and chronic pain in the developed world, impacting both functional ability and psychosocial health. The current review investigates the effectiveness of yoga on primary outcomes of functional ability, pain and psychosocial outcomes across a range of MSCs. METHODS: A comprehensive search of 20 databases was conducted for full-text, randomized controlled trials of yoga in clinically diagnosed MSCs.

Author(s): 
Ward, Lesley
Stebbings, Simon
Cherkin, Daniel
Baxter, G. David
Publication Title: 
The Spine Journal: Official Journal of the North American Spine Society

BACKGROUND CONTEXT: In 2008, the lack of published evidence prevented the Bone and Joint Decade 2000-2010 Task Force on Neck Pain and Its Associated Disorders (Neck Pain Task Force [NPTF]) from commenting on the effectiveness of psychological interventions for the management of neck pain. PURPOSE: This study aimed to update findings of the NPTF and evaluate the effectiveness of psychological interventions for the management of neck pain and associated disorders (NAD) or whiplash-associated disorders (WAD). STUDY DESIGN/SETTING: This study used systematic review and best-evidence synthesis.

Author(s): 
Shearer, Heather M.
Carroll, Linda J.
Wong, Jessica J.
Côté, Pierre
Varatharajan, Sharanya
Southerst, Danielle
Sutton, Deborah A.
Randhawa, Kristi A.
Yu, Hainan
Mior, Silvano A.
van der Velde, Gabrielle M.
Nordin, Margareta C.
Stupar, Maja
Taylor-Vaisey, Anne L.
Publication Title: 
Age and Ageing

OBJECTIVE: one-third of community-dwelling older adults fall annually. Exercise that challenges balance is proven to prevent falls. We conducted a systematic review with meta-analysis to determine the impact of yoga-based exercise on balance and physical mobility in people aged 60+ years. METHODS: searches for relevant trials were conducted on the following electronic databases: MEDLINE, EMBASE, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, CINAHL, Allied and Complementary Medicine Database and the Physiotherapy Evidence Database (PEDro) from inception to February 2015.

Author(s): 
Youkhana, Sabrina
Dean, Catherine M.
Wolff, Moa
Sherrington, Catherine
Tiedemann, Anne
Publication Title: 
European Journal of Preventive Cardiology

BACKGROUND: Due to new treatment modalities in the last decades, a decline in cardiovascular deaths has been observed. There is an emerging field of secondary prevention and behavioural programmes with increased interest in the use of mind-body practices. Until now, these have not been established in cardiovascular disease treatment programmes. DESIGN: We performed a systematic review and meta-analysis of the available evidence on the effectiveness of mind-body practices for patients with diagnosed cardiac disease.

Author(s): 
Younge, John O.
Gotink, Rinske A.
Baena, Cristina P.
Roos-Hesselink, Jolien W.
Hunink, M. G. Myriam
Publication Title: 
The Spine Journal: Official Journal of the North American Spine Society

BACKGROUND CONTEXT: In 2008, the Neck Pain Task Force (NPTF) recommended exercise for the management of neck pain and whiplash-associated disorders (WAD). However, no evidence was available on the effectiveness of exercise for Grade III neck pain or WAD. Moreover, limited evidence was available to contrast the effectiveness of various types of exercises. PURPOSE: To update the findings of the NPTF on the effectiveness of exercise for the management of neck pain and WAD grades I to III. STUDY DESIGN/SETTING: Systematic review and best evidence synthesis.

Author(s): 
Southerst, Danielle
Nordin, Margareta C.
Côté, Pierre
Shearer, Heather M.
Varatharajan, Sharanya
Yu, Hainan
Wong, Jessica J.
Sutton, Deborah A.
Randhawa, Kristi A.
van der Velde, Gabrielle M.
Mior, Silvano A.
Carroll, Linda J.
Jacobs, Craig L.
Taylor-Vaisey, Anne L.
Publication Title: 
Clinical Journal of Sport Medicine: Official Journal of the Canadian Academy of Sport Medicine

OBJECTIVE: Physical interventions (nonpharmacological and nonsurgical) are the mainstay of treatment for patellofemoral pain syndrome (PFPS). Physiotherapy is the most common of all physical interventions and includes specific vastus medialis obliquus or general quadriceps strengthening and/or realignment procedures (tape, brace, stretching). These treatments appear to be based on sound theoretical rationale and have attained widespread acceptance, but evidence for the efficacy of these interventions is not well established.

Author(s): 
Crossley, K.
Bennell, K.
Green, S.
McConnell, J.
Publication Title: 
Spine

BACKGROUND: Low back pain affects a large proportion of the population. Transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) was introduced more than 30 years ago as an alternative therapy to pharmacologic treatments for chronic pain. However, despite its widespread use, the efficacy of TENS is still controversial. PURPOSE: The aim of this meta-analysis was to determine the efficacy of TENS in the treatment of chronic low back pain. METHODS: The authors searched MEDLINE, EMBASE, PEDro, and the Cochrane Controlled Trials Register up to June 1, 2000.

Author(s): 
Brosseau, Lucie
Milne, Sarah
Robinson, Vivian
Marchand, Serge
Shea, Beverley
Wells, George
Tugwell, Peter

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