Reference Values

Publication Title: 
Journal of Alternative and Complementary Medicine (New York, N.Y.)

OBJECTIVE: Several studies suggest that yoga can decrease oxidative stress. However reports are scanty regarding whether yoga training can improve the glutathione level of individual. This study is designed to appraise the role of yoga in maintaining glutathione (reduced and oxidized) levels and antioxidant status. STUDY DESIGN: This study was conducted on healthy male volunteers from the Indian Navy, who were divided into two groups--a yoga (n = 30) group and a control (n = 21) group. The yoga group was trained in yoga for 6 months.

Author(s): 
Sinha, Sanchari
Singh, Som Nath
Monga, Y. P.
Ray, Uday Sankar
Publication Title: 
Journal of Alternative and Complementary Medicine (New York, N.Y.)

OBJECTIVES: The objective of this study was to evaluate the immediate effect of slow pace bhastrika pranayama (respiratory rate 6/min) for 5 minutes on heart rate and blood pressure and the effect of the same breathing exercise for the same duration of time (5 minutes) following oral intake of hyoscine-N-butylbromide (Buscopan), a parasympathetic blocker drug. SUBJECTS AND METHODS: Heart rate and blood pressure of volunteers (n = 39, age = 25-40 years) was recorded following standard procedure.

Author(s): 
Pramanik, Tapas
Sharma, Hari Om
Mishra, Suchita
Mishra, Anurag
Prajapati, Rajesh
Singh, Smriti
Publication Title: 
Journal of Alternative and Complementary Medicine (New York, N.Y.)

OBJECTIVES: Yoga is a popular form of exercise in the Western world, and yoga's effects on pulmonary function have been investigated previously. The purpose of this article is to review this research systematically and determine if regular yoga training improves pulmonary function in apparently healthy individuals. METHODS: Using the Alternative Health Watch, the Physical Education Index, Medline,(®) and the SPORTdiscus databases; and the keywords yoga, respiration, and pulmonary function, a comprehensive search was conducted that yielded 57 studies.

Author(s): 
Abel, Allison N.
Lloyd, Lisa K.
Williams, James S.
Publication Title: 
Psychological Assessment

In the present article, the authors report on the development of a scale for the measurement of the militant extremist mind-set. A previous pilot study identified 56 statements selected from writings of various terrorist groups as well as from psychological, historical, and political texts on terrorism. These statements, together with measures of personality, social attitudes, values, and social cynicism, were administered to participants from 9 countries (N = 2,424). A series of exploratory factor analyses of 56 statements produced 3 factors: Proviolence, Vile World, and Divine Power.

Author(s): 
Stankov, Lazar
Saucier, Gerard
Knezevi?, Goran
Publication Title: 
Social Science Research

The Catholic Church has had a strong influence on the Chilean legal and social landscape in ways that have adversely affected victims of intimate partner violence; e.g., it succeeded until just five years ago in blocking efforts to legalize divorce. At the same time, quantitative studies based on survey data from the United States and other countries show a generally favorable influence of religion on health and many other domains of life, including intimate partner violence. The present study explores the puzzle posed by these seemingly opposing macro- and micro-level forces.

Author(s): 
Lehrer, Evelyn L.
Lehrer, Vivian L.
Krauss, Ramona C.
Publication Title: 
International Journal of Cardiology

We report extremely prominent heart rate oscillations associated with slow breathing during specific traditional forms of Chinese Chi and Kundalini Yoga meditation techniques in healthy young adults. We applied both spectral analysis and a novel analytic technique based on the Hilbert transform to quantify these heart rate dynamics.

Author(s): 
Peng, C. K.
Mietus, J. E.
Liu, Y.
Khalsa, G.
Douglas, P. S.
Benson, H.
Goldberger, A. L.
Publication Title: 
Journal of Alternative and Complementary Medicine (New York, N.Y.)

BACKGROUND: Correlating phenotypes with genotypes remains the major postgenomic challenge. Attempts to correlate phenotype characteristics associated with ethnicity, geographical divisions, or diseases to genotypes have had limited success. This means that current approaches for identifying phenotypes associated with haplotypes may be inadequate. OBJECTIVES: We hypothesize that a human phenome based on Ayurveda could provide an appropriate approach. Specifically, there could be a genetic basis for the three major constitutions (Prakriti) described in Ayurveda.

Author(s): 
Bhushan, Patwardhan
Kalpana, Joshi
Arvind, Chopra
Publication Title: 
Journal of Alternative and Complementary Medicine (New York, N.Y.)

Ayurvedic oil-dripping treatment, Shirodhara, involves the use of medicated herbal sesame oils. In our previous reports, we found that Shirodhara with plain sesame oil induced anxiolysis and an altered state of consciousness (ASC) in healthy subjects. We studied the pharmaco-physio-psychologic effect of Shirodhara with medicated sesame oil including an essential oil from Lavendula angustifolia (lavender) in the present study.

Author(s): 
Xu, Fenghao
Uebaba, Kazuo
Ogawa, Hiroko
Tatsuse, Takeshi
Wang, Bing-Hong
Hisajima, Tatsuya
Venkatraman, Sonia
Publication Title: 
Journal of Alternative and Complementary Medicine (New York, N.Y.)

OBJECTIVE: This study assessed the psychoneuroimmunologic changes achieved by Shirodhara, an Ayurvedic treatment, characterized by dripping oil on the forehead, in a randomized, controlled protocol involving a novel approach using a robotic system. METHODS: In the first experiment for the determination of the most appropriate conditions of Shirodhara, 16 healthy females (33 +/- 9 years old) underwent a 30-minute treatment.

Author(s): 
Uebaba, Kazuo
Xu, Feng-Hao
Ogawa, Hiroko
Tatsuse, Takashi
Wang, Bing-Hong
Hisajima, Tatsuya
Venkatraman, Sonia
Publication Title: 
Journal of Toxicology. Clinical Toxicology

Consumption of the hepatotoxin arsenic is very common in certain geographical areas of India and occurs as a result of the intake of arsenic contaminated water, vegetables, adultered opium, ayurvedic and indigenous medicines, and "home made brew". Arsenic levels were estimated in livers obtained after autopsy from patients of idiopathic cirrhosis, alcoholic cirrhosis, Indian childhood cirrhosis, non-cirrhotic portal fibrosis, fulminant hepatitis and Wilson's disease.

Author(s): 
Narang, A. P.

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