Relaxation

Publication Title: 
Journal of obstetric, gynecologic, and neonatal nursing: JOGNN

OBJECTIVE: To examine published evidence on the effectiveness of mind-body interventions during pregnancy on perceived stress, mood, and perinatal outcomes. DATA SOURCES: Computerized searches of PubMed, Cinahl, PsycINFO, and the Cochrane Library. STUDY SELECTION: Twelve out of 64 published intervention studies between 1980 and February 2007 of healthy, adult pregnant women met criteria for review. DATA EXTRACTION AND SYNTHESIS: Studies were categorized by type of mind-body modality used. Progressive muscle relaxation was the most common intervention.

Author(s): 
Beddoe, Amy E.
Lee, Kathryn A.
Publication Title: 
Rheumatology International

A systematic review with meta-analysis of the efficacy and safety of meditative movement therapies (Qigong, Tai Chi and Yoga) in fibromyalgia syndrome (FMS) was carried out. We screened Clinicaltrials.Gov, Cochrane Library, PsycINFO, PubMed and Scopus (through December 2010) and the reference sections of original studies for meditative movement therapies (MMT) in FMS. Randomized controlled trials (RCT) comparing MMT to controls were analysed. Outcomes of efficacy were pain, sleep, fatigue, depression and health-related quality of life (HRQOL).

Author(s): 
Langhorst, Jost
Klose, Petra
Dobos, Gustav J.
Bernardy, Kathrin
Häuser, Winfried
Publication Title: 
Menopause (New York, N.Y.)

OBJECTIVE: To update and expand The North American Menopause Society's evidence-based position on nonhormonal management of menopause-associated vasomotor symptoms (VMS), previously a portion of the position statement on the management of VMS. METHODS: NAMS enlisted clinical and research experts in the field and a reference librarian to identify and review available evidence. Five different electronic search engines were used to cull relevant literature. Using the literature, experts created a document for final approval by the NAMS Board of Trustees.

Publication Title: 
Aging & Mental Health

OBJECTIVES: This systematic review examined empirical evidence of the effects of relaxation interventions on anxiety and depression among older adults. METHOD: A comprehensive literature search identified studies that satisfied the pre-set inclusion and exclusion criteria. We focused on 15 published and non-published studies - 12 randomised controlled trials and three non-randomised controlled trials - undertaken in the past 20 years (1994-2014). Three reviewers selected studies, extracted data, and appraised the methodological quality.

Author(s): 
Klainin-Yobas, Piyanee
Oo, Win Nuang
Suzanne Yew, Pey Ying
Lau, Ying
Publication Title: 
Explore (New York, N.Y.)

OBJECTIVE: The objective of this article was to present a methodology incorporating existing guidelines and tools for systematic reviews and to evaluate the Delphi survey 33 key component recommendations of yoga interventions for musculoskeletal conditions as a tool for a systematic review in fibromyalgia studies. DATA SOURCES: Databases searched included PubMed, Ovid Medline, PsychINFO, the Cochrane Library, CINAHL, ALT HealthWatch, PEDro, and Web of Science.

Author(s): 
Fischer-White, Tamara G.
Anderson, Joel G.
Taylor, Ann Gill
Publication Title: 
Alternative Therapies in Health and Medicine

OBJECTIVE: This article reports a systematic review and critical appraisal of the effect of yoga on stress management in healthy adults. METHODS: A systematic literature search was performed to identify randomized controlled trials (RCTs) and clinical controlled trials (CCTs) that assessed the effects of yoga on stress management in healthy adults. Selected studies were classified according to the types of intervention, duration, outcome measures, and results. They were also qualitatively assessed based on Public Health Research, Education and Development standards.

Author(s): 
Chong, Cecilia S. M.
Tsunaka, Megumi
Tsang, Hector W. H.
Chan, Edward P.
Cheung, Wai Ming
Publication Title: 
Journal of obstetric, gynecologic, and neonatal nursing: JOGNN

OBJECTIVE: To examine published evidence on the effectiveness of mind-body interventions during pregnancy on perceived stress, mood, and perinatal outcomes. DATA SOURCES: Computerized searches of PubMed, Cinahl, PsycINFO, and the Cochrane Library. STUDY SELECTION: Twelve out of 64 published intervention studies between 1980 and February 2007 of healthy, adult pregnant women met criteria for review. DATA EXTRACTION AND SYNTHESIS: Studies were categorized by type of mind-body modality used. Progressive muscle relaxation was the most common intervention.

Author(s): 
Beddoe, Amy E.
Lee, Kathryn A.
Publication Title: 
Psychological Bulletin

We report the results of meta-analyses on 3 types of free-response study: (a) ganzfeld (a technique that enhances a communication anomaly referred to as "psi"); (b) nonganzfeld noise reduction using alleged psi-enhancing techniques such as dream psi, meditation, relaxation, or hypnosis; and (c) standard free response (nonganzfeld, no noise reduction). For the period 1997-2008, a homogeneous data set of 29 ganzfeld studies yielded a mean effect size of 0.142 (Stouffer Z = 5.48, p = 2.13 x 10(-8)).

Author(s): 
Storm, Lance
Tressoldi, Patrizio E.
Di Risio, Lorenzo
Publication Title: 
Rheumatology International

A systematic review with meta-analysis of the efficacy and safety of meditative movement therapies (Qigong, Tai Chi and Yoga) in fibromyalgia syndrome (FMS) was carried out. We screened Clinicaltrials.Gov, Cochrane Library, PsycINFO, PubMed and Scopus (through December 2010) and the reference sections of original studies for meditative movement therapies (MMT) in FMS. Randomized controlled trials (RCT) comparing MMT to controls were analysed. Outcomes of efficacy were pain, sleep, fatigue, depression and health-related quality of life (HRQOL).

Author(s): 
Langhorst, Jost
Klose, Petra
Dobos, Gustav J.
Bernardy, Kathrin
Häuser, Winfried
Publication Title: 
Rheumatology International

A systematic review with meta-analysis of the efficacy and safety of meditative movement therapies (Qigong, Tai Chi and Yoga) in fibromyalgia syndrome (FMS) was carried out. We screened Clinicaltrials.Gov, Cochrane Library, PsycINFO, PubMed and Scopus (through December 2010) and the reference sections of original studies for meditative movement therapies (MMT) in FMS. Randomized controlled trials (RCT) comparing MMT to controls were analysed. Outcomes of efficacy were pain, sleep, fatigue, depression and health-related quality of life (HRQOL).

Author(s): 
Langhorst, Jost
Klose, Petra
Dobos, Gustav J.
Bernardy, Kathrin
Häuser, Winfried

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