Religion and Medicine

Publication Title: 
Journal of Professional Nursing: Official Journal of the American Association of Colleges of Nursing

This article argues that in the current setting of nursing practice, therapeutic touch should be treated as a religious practice. The article examines the religious sources of the ideas and documents the connection with the teachings of particular religious groups. Recognizing therapeutic touch as a religious issue requires new kinds of approaches in the practice and teaching of therapeutic touch in nursing.

Author(s): 
Bullough, V. L.
Bullough, B.
Publication Title: 
California Medicine
Author(s): 
Veith, I.
Publication Title: 
Journal of Alternative and Complementary Medicine (New York, N.Y.)

OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to compare religious characteristics of general internists, rheumatologists, naturopaths, and acupuncturists, as well as to examine associations between physicians' religious characteristics and their openness to integrating complementary and alternative medicine (CAM). DESIGN: The design involved a national mail survey. The subjects were internists, rheumatologists, naturopaths, and acupuncturists. MEASURES: Physician outcome measures were use of and attitudes toward six classes of CAM.

Author(s): 
Curlin, Farr A.
Rasinski, Kenneth A.
Kaptchuk, Ted J.
Emanuel, Ezekiel J.
Miller, Franklin G.
Tilburt, Jon C.
Publication Title: 
Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society of London. Series B, Biological Sciences

Using a comparative analysis of Navajo healing ceremonials, acupuncture and biomedical treatment, this essay examines placebo studies and ritual theory as mutually interpenetrating disciplines. Healing rituals create a receptive person susceptible to the influences of authoritative culturally sanctioned 'powers'. The healer provides the sufferer with imaginative, emotional, sensory, moral and aesthetic input derived from the palpable symbols and procedures of the ritual process-in the process fusing the sufferer's idiosyncratic narrative unto a universal cultural mythos.

Author(s): 
Kaptchuk, Ted J.
Publication Title: 
Ŭi Sahak

Je Jung Won was the first modern-style Government hospital built by the Korean King Ko-Jong in April 1885, and it was the medical missionary Horace Newton Allen(1858~1932) who made one of the greatest contributions to the establishment of the hospital. Allen was an American missionary. He graduated from Ohio Wesleyan University with a degree in theology in 1881, and completed one-yearcourse at Miami Medical College. In Korea and America he worked as a physician, a missionary, an American diplomatic minister to Korea and a Korean minister's secretary to America.

Author(s): 
Lee, Young Ah

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