Religion and Medicine

Publication Title: 
Family & Community Health

This article documents the historical factors that led to shifts in mission work toward a greater emphasis on community health for the poor and most vulnerable of society in sub-Saharan Africa after 1945. Using the example of the Medical Mission Sisters from Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, and their work in Ghana, we challenge the conventional narrative of medical missions as agents of imperialism.

Author(s): 
Johnson, Lauren
Wall, Barbra Mann
Publication Title: 
Global Public Health

In Burkina Faso, abortion is legally restricted and socially stigmatised, but also frequent. Unsafe abortions represent a significant public health challenge, contributing to the country's very high maternal mortality ratio. Inspired by an internationally disseminated public health framing of unsafe abortion, the country's main policy response has been to provide post-abortion care (PAC) to avert deaths from abortion complications.

Author(s): 
Storeng, Katerini T.
Ouattara, Fatoumata
Publication Title: 
Social Science & Medicine (1982)

The Caribbean region presents the highest prevalence of HIV/AIDS worldwide after sub-Saharan Africa; leading to serious social, economic and health consequences at the local scale but also at the regional and global levels. In Colombia, a national plan to tackle the epidemic was formulated with little evidence that its implementation in the local context is effective.

Author(s): 
Djellouli, Nehla
Quevedo-GÛmez, MarÌa Cristina
Publication Title: 
BMC health services research

BACKGROUND: Faith-based organizations (FBOs) have been successful in delivering health promotion programs for African Americans, though few studies have been conducted among Latinos. Even fewer have focused on organizational change, which is required to sustain community-based initiatives. We hypothesized that FBOs serving Latinos would be more likely to offer evidence-based strategies (EBS) for cancer control after receiving a capacity enhancement intervention to implement health programs, and designed the CRUZA trial to test this hypothesis.

Author(s): 
Allen, Jennifer D.
Torres, Maria Idali
Tom, Laura S.
Rustan, Sarah
Leyva, Bryan
Negron, Rosalyn
Linnan, Laura A.
Jandorf, Lina
Ospino, Hosffman
Publication Title: 
Psychiatria Danubina

Often it is overlooked that Christian Spirituality involves a personal relationship of a human being with God. It is of interest that both the Protestant Reformers and the exponents of the Catholic Counter Reformation agreed upon this. Two of the greatest exponents of the Counter-Reformation, both of whom were made Doctors of the Church because of their teaching on Prayer were Saint Teresa of Avila and Saint John of the Cross. This year is the 500th anniversary of the birth of Saint Teresa of Avila.

Author(s): 
Agius, Mark
Publication Title: 
Health Progress (Saint Louis, Mo.)

The ministry of advocacy has been an integral part of Catholic health care, beginning with the pioneering women religious who both cared for those in need and advocated for their health and welfare, as well as for the organizational structures to help them.

Author(s): 
Sister Kathleen Popko, null
Publication Title: 
Hospital Progress

The nature of the physician-patient relationship underlies the professional's obligation to respect each person. Religion moves those involved in caring for the sick beyond professionalism to a profound sense of common humanity under the Father, of healing as a work of God, and of love as the primary bond with patients.

Author(s): 
Thomasma, D. C.
Publication Title: 
Women & Health

New technologies of conception bring into being beautiful babies. The wonder of these children, and of the technologies themselves, can tempt us to abbreviate ethical reflection on the moral appropriateness of initiating human life in this way. However, the moralists of the Catholic Church, along with many others, judge that human life should originate in acts of love between parents, not in productive acts of technologists.

Author(s): 
Lawler, R. D.
Publication Title: 
Social Science & Medicine (1982)

Karo Batak ceremonial curing practices in urban Indonesia take place in a disputed zone of acts and meanings, in which neither social nor cultural coherence can be presumed by the analyst.

Author(s): 
Steedly, M. M.
Publication Title: 
Nursing Ethics

In the West, the term 'tender, loving care' (TLC) has traditionally been used as a defining term that characterizes nursing. When this expression informs practice, it can comfort the human spirit at times of fear and vulnerability. Such notions offer meaning and resonance to the 'lived experience' of giving and receiving care. This suggests that, in a nursing context, TLC is rooted firmly in relationship, that is, the dynamic that exists between carer and cared for.

Author(s): 
Kendrick, Kevin David
Robinson, Simon

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