Religious Missions

Publication Title: 
Historia, Ciencias, Saude--Manguinhos

Deriving funding from missionary sources in Ireland, Britain and the USA, and from international leprosy relief organizations such as the British Empire Leprosy Relief Association (BELRA) and drawing on developing capacities in international public health under the auspices of WHO and UNICEF through the 1950s, the Roman Catholic Mission Ogoja Leprosy Scheme applied international expertise at a local level with ever-increasing success and coverage.

Author(s): 
Manton, John
Publication Title: 
The Journal of the American College of Dentists

Creighton University, a Jesuit institution of higher education, has supported a community health program in the poor and remote areas of the Dominican Republic since 1976. This program is built around multidisciplinary health teams combining undergraduate and graduate students in various health professional schools with practitioners. A permanent center in the Dominican Republic has been established for coordination and training. The program is conceived as providing participants an opportunity to reflect on their own spiritual development.

Author(s): 
Ayers, Frank J.
Publication Title: 
African Journal of Medicine and Medical Sciences

Antenatal care (ANC) services have the aim of monitoring the course of pregnancy, in order to promote favourable outcomes. In spite of the fact that its components have been found to improve pregnancy outcomes, maternal/infant morbidity and mortality still remain public health problems in most developing countries including Nigeria. These unacceptable health indicators form the basis of this study. The records of 581 women who attended ANC at the Catholic Hospital between October 2005 and September 2006 were accessed.

Author(s): 
Aluko, J. O.
Oluwatosin, A.
Publication Title: 
Salud Colectiva

By analyzing the content and network of production of a map from 1751, created by the circular mission of the Jesuits in ChiloÈ (an archipelago located off the southern coast of Chile), that contains birth, death and population data, this article discusses the role that health statistics play historically, philosophically, technically and sociologically.

Author(s): 
Carvajal, Yuri
Yuing, Tuillang
Publication Title: 
Family & Community Health

This article documents the historical factors that led to shifts in mission work toward a greater emphasis on community health for the poor and most vulnerable of society in sub-Saharan Africa after 1945. Using the example of the Medical Mission Sisters from Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, and their work in Ghana, we challenge the conventional narrative of medical missions as agents of imperialism.

Author(s): 
Johnson, Lauren
Wall, Barbra Mann
Publication Title: 
Family & Community Health

This article situates women's roles in community health care during violence in Uganda in the 1970s. It examines the lived reality of Catholic missionary sister nurses, midwives, and physicians on the ground where sisters administered health care to local communities. The goal is to examine how religious women worked with local individuals and families in community health during periods of violence and war. Catholic sisters claimed to be apolitical, yet their mission work widened to include political issues.

Author(s): 
Reckart, Madeline
Wall, Barbra Mann
Publication Title: 
Family & Community Health

Access to health care has been a factor for patients living in isolated mountain regions. The Frontier Nursing service was a pioneer in reaching those patients living in the most remote regions of Appalachia. Geography, demographics, and culture present obstacles for rural residents and health care providers. This article identifies and describes the roles nurses and nurse practitioners played in caring for Appalachian families through a roving Health Wagon in the 1980s and 1990s in Southwest Virginia.

Author(s): 
Snyder, Audrey
Thatcher, Esther
Publication Title: 
ANZ journal of surgery

In the early years of the introduction of Christianity into China, one American medical missionary distinguished himself by his kindness and generosity towards the Chinese people, and also by his surgical prowess. Peter Parker (1804-1888) was a graduate from the Yale University Medical School and was also an ordained minister. He came to the south China city of Canton (now called Guangzhou) in 1834, built a hospital, treated the patients without charge and also groomed medical apprentices to help him in his work.

Author(s): 
Low, Gordon
Publication Title: 
ANZ journal of surgery

In the early years of the introduction of Christianity into China, one American medical missionary distinguished himself by his kindness and generosity towards the Chinese people, and also by his surgical prowess. Peter Parker (1804-1888) was a graduate from the Yale University Medical School and was also an ordained minister. He came to the south China city of Canton (now called Guangzhou) in 1834, built a hospital, treated the patients without charge and also groomed medical apprentices to help him in his work.

Author(s): 
Low, Gordon
Publication Title: 
BMC health services research

BACKGROUND: Short-term medical missions (STMMs) represent a grass-roots form of aid, transferring medical services rather than funds or equipment. The objective of this paper is to review empirical studies on social, economic and diplomatic aspects of STMMs. METHODS: A systematic literature review was conducted by searching PubMed and EBSCOhost for articles published from 1947-2014 about medical missions to lower and middle income countries (LMICs). Publications focused on military, disaster and dental service trips were excluded.

Author(s): 
Caldron, Paul H.
Impens, Ann
Pavlova, Milena
Groot, Wim

Pages

Subscribe to RSS - Religious Missions