Research Personnel

Publication Title: 
Nurse Researcher

AIM: To highlight from a doctoral student's perspective some of the unexpected and challenging issues that may arise when collecting data in a complex, qualitative study. BACKGROUND: Using a qualitative approach to undertaking a PhD requires commitment to the research topic, the acquisition of a variety of research skills and the development of expertise in writing. Despite close research supervision and guidance, the first author of this paper experienced unexpected hurdles when collecting data.

Author(s): 
Dowse, Eileen Mary
van der Riet, Pamela
Keatinge, Diana Rosemary
Publication Title: 
Journal of Alternative and Complementary Medicine (New York, N.Y.)

Prompted by the open letter by 13 prominent British scientists to National Health Science (NHS) trusts questioning the use of homeopathy, Vinjar Fønnebø, M.D., Ph.D., and Michael Baum, M.B., Ch.M., F.R.C.S., M.D.(Hon) entered into an e-mail exchange about the issues of research and documentation of practices in "complementary," "alternative," and "integrated" medicine. The paper presents the whole exchange unedited.

Author(s): 
Fønnebø, Vinjar
Baum, Michael
Publication Title: 
U.S. News & World Report
Author(s): 
Schultz, S.
Publication Title: 
Historical Studies in the Natural Sciences

Since the 1930s scientists from fields such as biochemistry, pathology, immunology, genetics, neuroscience, and nutrition have studied the relation of dietary caloric intake to longevity and aging. This paper discusses how Clive Maine McCay, a professor of animal husbandry at Cornell University, began his investigation of the topic and promoted it as a productive research program in the multidisciplinary science of gerontology.

Author(s): 
Park, Hyung Wook
Publication Title: 
Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal

Religious discussion of human organs and tissues has concentrated largely on donation for therapeutic purposes. The retrieval and use of human tissue samples in diagnostic, research, and education contexts have, by contrast, received very little direct theological attention. Initially undertaken at the behest of the National Bioethics Advisory Commission, this essay seeks to explore the theological and religious questions embedded in nontherapeutic use of human tissue.

Author(s): 
Campbell, Courtney S.
Publication Title: 
Ethics & Behavior

Religious traditions can be drawn on in a number of ways to illuminate discussions of the moral standing of animals and the ethical use of animals in scientific research. I begin with some general comments about relevant points in the history of major religions. I then briefly describe American civil religion, including the cult of health, and its relation to scientific research. Finally, I offer a critique of American civil religion from a Christian perspective.

Author(s): 
Smith, David H.
Publication Title: 
Bioethics

We describe the informed consent procedures in a research clinic in Santiago, Chile, and a qualitative study that evaluated these procedures. The recruitment process involves information, counseling and screening of volunteers, and three or four visits to the clinic. The study explored the decision-making process of women participating in contraceptive trials through 36 interviews. Women understood the research as experimentation or progress.

Author(s): 
Sanchez, S.
Salazar, G.
Tijero, M.
Diaz, S.
Publication Title: 
Annals (Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons of Canada)

With increasing economic, political, and bureaucratic involvement in research, there is little focus on the medical researcher's idealistic and benevolent intentions. Benevolence is a pillar of ethical human-subjects research, and altruism is a form of benevolence that is difficult to quantify. It is interest in the welfare of others without personal benefit. This article examines the extent of altruism in medical research from philosophical, psychological, and practical points of view.

Author(s): 
von Schroeder, H. P.
Publication Title: 
The American journal of bioethics: AJOB

Scholars have debated the role that altruistic considerations play--and should play--in recruitment and decision-making processes for clinical trials. Little empirical data are available to support their various perspectives. We analyzed 140 audiotaped pediatric informed consent sessions, of which 95 (68%) included at least one discussion of how participation in a cancer clinical trial might benefit: 1) the pursuit of scientific knowledge generally; 2) other children with cancer specifically; and 3) "the future" and other vaguely defined recipients.

Author(s): 
Simon, Christian
Eder, Michelle
Kodish, Eric
Siminoff, Laura
Publication Title: 
Nursing Outlook

OBJECTIVE: Research coordinators have significant responsibilities in clinical trials that often require them to find unique ways to manage their jobs, thus reshaping their professional identities. The purpose of this study was to identify how research coordinators manage role and ethical conflicts within clinical research trials. METHODS: A qualitative study combining observation and 63 semistructured interviews at 25 research organizations was used. RESULTS: Altruism is a recurring theme in how research coordinators define and view their work.

Author(s): 
Fisher, Jill A.
Kalbaugh, Corey A.

Pages

Subscribe to RSS - Research Personnel