Research Support as Topic

Publication Title: 
Annals of Internal Medicine

A reflection on the scientific behavior of adherents of conventional medicine toward one form of alternative medicine-homeopathy-teaches us that physicians do reject seemingly solid evidence because it is not compatible with theory. Further reflection, however, shows that physicians do the same within conventional medical science: Sometimes they discard a theory because of new facts, but at other times they cling to a theory despite the facts. This essay highlights the seeming contradiction and discusses whether it still permits the building of rational medical science.

Author(s): 
Vandenbroucke, J. P.
de Craen, A. J.
Publication Title: 
Complementary Therapies in Clinical Practice

Research into complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) is not as new as it might appear from a U.K. perspective. Most continental European countries have a long tradition in CAM research. Many studies of homoeopathy, for instance, were published decades ago in languages other than English [The trials of homeopathy. Origins, structure and development. Stiftung: Essen, Karl und Veronica Carstens, 2004].

Author(s): 
Ernst, E.
Schmidt, K.
Wider, B.
Publication Title: 
BMC complementary and alternative medicine

BACKGROUND: Scientific interest in acupuncture has led numerous investigators to conduct clinical trials to test the efficacy of acupuncture for various conditions, but the mechanisms underlying acupuncture are poorly understood. METHODS: The author conducted a PubMed search to obtain a fair sample of acupuncture clinical trials published in English in 2005. Each article was reviewed for a physiologic rationale, as well as study objectives and outcomes, experimental and control interventions, country of origin, funding sources and journal type.

Author(s): 
Moffet, Howard H.
Publication Title: 
Alternative Therapies in Health and Medicine

A significant practical, yet perhaps under-appreciated, barrier to a more active role of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) institutions in research is the organizational infrastructure required for submitting and managing research grants.

Author(s): 
Wayne, Peter M.
Pensack, Lawrence M.
Connors, Ellen M.
Buring, Julie E.
Davis, Roger B.
Schachter, Steve C.
Hrbek, Andrea
Kaptchuk, Ted J.
Andrews, Sally M.
Publication Title: 
Alternative Therapies in Health and Medicine

Few complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) institutions require their students to undergo substantive training in research literacy and conduct, and well-developed programs to train CAM institution faculty in research are virtually non-existent.

Author(s): 
Wayne, Peter M.
Buring, Julie E.
Davis, Roger B.
Andrews, Sally M.
John, Meredith St
Kerr, Catherine E.
Kaptchuk, Ted J.
Schachter, Steven C.
Publication Title: 
Alternative Therapies in Health and Medicine

A significant practical, yet perhaps under-appreciated, barrier to a more active role of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) institutions in research is the organizational infrastructure required for submitting and managing research grants.

Author(s): 
Wayne, Peter M.
Pensack, Lawrence M.
Connors, Ellen M.
Buring, Julie E.
Davis, Roger B.
Schachter, Steve C.
Hrbek, Andrea
Kaptchuk, Ted J.
Andrews, Sally M.
Publication Title: 
Progress in Clinical and Biological Research
Author(s): 
Butler, R. N.
Publication Title: 
Science (New York, N.Y.)
Author(s): 
Holden, Constance
Publication Title: 
The Milbank Quarterly

Aging can be slowed in laboratory rodents by low-calorie diets, and changes in single genes can extend mouse life span by 40 percent or more. Therefore, despite its surface complexity and effects on multiple cells and intercellular systems, aging in mammals might also be retarded by both genetic and nongenetic means. If human aging could be slowed pharmacologically to the extent now possible in rodents, the effect on healthy life expectancy would exceed that of abolishing cancer, cardiovascular disease, and adult-onset diabetes.

Author(s): 
Miller, Richard A.
Publication Title: 
Science of aging knowledge environment: SAGE KE

The National Institute on Aging (NIA) began operation in 1975, splitting off from the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development. The first 10 years of NIA's existence were characterized by funding descriptive and discovery research, as the field by then had not come of age.

Author(s): 
Warner, Huber R.

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