Resistance Training

Publication Title: 
Oncology Nursing Forum

PURPOSE/OBJECTIVES: To evaluate the effectiveness of exercise interventions on overall health-related quality of life (HRQOL) and its domains among adults scheduled to, or actively undergoing, cancer treatment. DATA SOURCES: 11 electronic databases were searched through November 2011. In addition, the authors searched PubMed's related article feature, trial registries, and reference lists of included trials and related reviews. DATA SYNTHESIS: 56 trials with 4,826 participants met the inclusion criteria.

Author(s): 
Mishra, Shiraz I.
Scherer, Roberta W.
Snyder, Claire
Geigle, Paula
Gotay, Carolyn
Publication Title: 
PloS One

BACKGROUND: Exercise training programs have emerged as a useful therapeutic regimen for the management of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Majority of the Western studies highlighted the effective role of exercise in T2DM. Therefore, the main aim was to focus on the extent, type of exercise and its clinical significance in T2DM in order to educate the clinicians from developing countries, especially in Asians.

Author(s): 
Thent, Zar Chi
Das, Srijit
Henry, Leonard Joseph
Publication Title: 
The Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews

BACKGROUND: People with cancer undergoing active treatment experience numerous disease- and treatment-related adverse outcomes and poorer health-related quality of life (HRQoL). Exercise interventions are hypothesized to alleviate these adverse outcomes. HRQoL and its domains are important measures of cancer survivorship, both during and after the end of active treatment for cancer. OBJECTIVES: To evaluate the effectiveness of exercise on overall HRQoL outcomes and specific HRQoL domains among adults with cancer during active treatment.

Author(s): 
Mishra, Shiraz I.
Scherer, Roberta W.
Snyder, Claire
Geigle, Paula M.
Berlanstein, Debra R.
Topaloglu, Ozlem
Publication Title: 
Oncology Nursing Forum

PURPOSE/OBJECTIVES: To evaluate the effectiveness of exercise interventions on overall health-related quality of life (HRQOL) and its domains among cancer survivors who have completed primary treatment. DATA SOURCES: 11 electronic databases were searched from inception (dates varied) to October 2011. The authors also identified eligible trials through a search of additional sources. DATA SYNTHESIS: 40 trials with 3,694 participants met the inclusion criteria.

Author(s): 
Mishra, Shiraz I.
Scherer, Roberta W.
Snyder, Claire
Geigle, Paula
Gotay, Carolyn
Publication Title: 
The Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews

BACKGROUND: Fear of falling is common in older people and associated with serious physical and psychosocial consequences. Exercise (planned, structured, repetitive and purposive physical activity aimed at improving physical fitness) may reduce fear of falling by improving strength, gait, balance and mood, and reducing the occurrence of falls. OBJECTIVES: To assess the effects (benefits, harms and costs) of exercise interventions for reducing fear of falling in older people living in the community.

Author(s): 
Kendrick, Denise
Kumar, Arun
Carpenter, Hannah
Zijlstra, G. A. Rixt
Skelton, Dawn A.
Cook, Juliette R.
Stevens, Zoe
Belcher, Carolyn M.
Haworth, Deborah
Gawler, Sheena J.
Gage, Heather
Masud, Tahir
Bowling, Ann
Pearl, Mirilee
Morris, Richard W.
Iliffe, Steve
Delbaere, Kim
Publication Title: 
The Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews

BACKGROUND: Although people with haematological malignancies have to endure long phases of therapy and immobility which is known to diminish their physical performance level, the advice to rest and avoid intensive exercises is still common practice. This recommendation is partly due to the severe anaemia and thrombocytopenia from which many patients suffer. The inability to perform activities of daily living restricts them, diminishes their quality of life and can influence medical therapy.

Author(s): 
Bergenthal, Nils
Will, Andrea
Streckmann, Fiona
Wolkewitz, Klaus-Dieter
Monsef, Ina
Engert, Andreas
Elter, Thomas
Skoetz, Nicole
Publication Title: 
The Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews

BACKGROUND: Multiple sclerosis (MS) is an immune-mediated disease of the central nervous system affecting an estimated 1.3 million people worldwide. It is characterised by a variety of disabling symptoms of which excessive fatigue is the most frequent. Fatigue is often reported as the most invalidating symptom in people with MS. Various mechanisms directly and indirectly related to the disease and physical inactivity have been proposed to contribute to the degree of fatigue.

Author(s): 
Heine, Martin
van de Port, Ingrid
Rietberg, Marc B.
van Wegen, Erwin E. H.
Kwakkel, Gert
Publication Title: 
The Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews

BACKGROUND: Influenza is an infectious virus affecting both humans and animals. In humans, symptoms present as fever, cough, sore throat, runny nose, headache, muscle and joint pain, and malaise. The epidemiological profile of influenza is influenced by multiple factors, including transmissibility of the virus and the susceptibility of the population. Annually, influenza is estimated to infect 5% to 10% of adults, with higher rates in winter seasons in countries with seasonal variation.

Author(s): 
Grande, Antonio Jose
Reid, Hamish
Thomas, Emma E.
Nunan, David
Foster, Charles
Publication Title: 
The Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews

BACKGROUND: Rehabilitation after ankle fracture can begin soon after the fracture has been treated, either surgically or non-surgically, by the use of different types of immobilisation that allow early commencement of weight-bearing or exercise. Alternatively, rehabilitation, including the use of physical or manual therapies, may start following the period of immobilisation. This is an update of a Cochrane review first published in 2008. OBJECTIVES: To assess the effects of rehabilitation interventions following conservative or surgical treatment of ankle fractures in adults.

Author(s): 
Lin, Chung-Wei Christine
Donkers, Nicole A. J.
Refshauge, Kathryn M.
Beckenkamp, Paula R.
Khera, Kriti
Moseley, Anne M.
Publication Title: 
The Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews

BACKGROUND: Exercise-based cardiac rehabilitation may benefit adults with atrial fibrillation or those who had been treated for atrial fibrillation. Atrial fibrillation is caused by multiple micro re-entry circuits within the atrial tissue, which result in chaotic rapid activity in the atria. OBJECTIVES: To assess the benefits and harms of exercise-based rehabilitation programmes, alone or with another intervention, compared with no-exercise training controls in adults who currently have AF, or have been treated for AF.

Author(s): 
Risom, Signe S.
Zwisler, Ann-Dorthe
Johansen, Pernille P.
Sibilitz, Kirstine L.
Lindschou, Jane
Gluud, Christian
Taylor, Rod S.
Svendsen, Jesper H.
Berg, Selina K.

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