Respiratory Mechanics

Publication Title: 
Respiratory Care

BACKGROUND: Meditative movement, such as tai chi, yoga, and qi gong, may benefit people with cystic fibrosis (CF), as a form of gentle exercise incorporating meditation, breathing, and relaxation. Respiratory function is the most common issue in CF. In this systematic review we synthesized the evidence on the effect of meditative movement on respiratory function in patients with CF. METHODS: We searched Chinese and English language databases with terms relating to tai chi/yoga/qi gong, and respiratory function/cough/dyspnea. Articles were screened and selected by 2 researchers.

Author(s): 
Lorenc, Ava B.
Wang, Yuyi
Madge, Susan L.
Hu, Xiaoyang
Mian, Awais M.
Robinson, Nicola
Publication Title: 
Respiratory Care

BACKGROUND: Meditative movement, such as tai chi, yoga, and qi gong, may benefit people with cystic fibrosis (CF), as a form of gentle exercise incorporating meditation, breathing, and relaxation. Respiratory function is the most common issue in CF. In this systematic review we synthesized the evidence on the effect of meditative movement on respiratory function in patients with CF. METHODS: We searched Chinese and English language databases with terms relating to tai chi/yoga/qi gong, and respiratory function/cough/dyspnea. Articles were screened and selected by 2 researchers.

Author(s): 
Lorenc, Ava B.
Wang, Yuyi
Madge, Susan L.
Hu, Xiaoyang
Mian, Awais M.
Robinson, Nicola
Publication Title: 
Lancet (London, England)

We tested, under independent conditions, the reproducibility of evidence from two previous trials that homoeopathy differs from placebo. The test model was again homoeopathic immunotherapy. 28 patients with allergic asthma, most of them sensitive to house-dust mite, were randomly allocated to receive either oral homoeopathic immunotherapy to their principal allergen or identical placebo. The test treatments were given as a complement to their unaltered conventional care. A daily visual analogue scale of overall symptom intensity was the outcome measure.

Author(s): 
Reilly, D.
Taylor, M. A.
Beattie, N. G.
Campbell, J. H.
McSharry, C.
Aitchison, T. C.
Carter, R.
Stevenson, R. D.
Publication Title: 
Respiratory Care

BACKGROUND: Meditative movement, such as tai chi, yoga, and qi gong, may benefit people with cystic fibrosis (CF), as a form of gentle exercise incorporating meditation, breathing, and relaxation. Respiratory function is the most common issue in CF. In this systematic review we synthesized the evidence on the effect of meditative movement on respiratory function in patients with CF. METHODS: We searched Chinese and English language databases with terms relating to tai chi/yoga/qi gong, and respiratory function/cough/dyspnea. Articles were screened and selected by 2 researchers.

Author(s): 
Lorenc, Ava B.
Wang, Yuyi
Madge, Susan L.
Hu, Xiaoyang
Mian, Awais M.
Robinson, Nicola
Publication Title: 
International Journal of Psychophysiology: Official Journal of the International Organization of Psychophysiology

Prototypical respiratory-facial-postural actions ('emotional effector patterns') related to six basic emotions had been extracted from an ensemble of physiological reactions present in subjects reliving intense emotional situations (Bloch & SantibaÒez, 1972). Subjects reproducing these actions could evoke the corresponding subjective experience, which suggested their use as an experimental model for generating controlled emotional states.

Author(s): 
Bloch, S.
Lemeignan, M.
Aguilera, N.
Publication Title: 
Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology
Author(s): 
Thornton, J. M.
Pederson, D. L.
Kardos, A.
Guz, A.
Casadei, B.
Paterson, D. J.
Publication Title: 
Arzneimittel-Forschung

The general pharmacological properties of YJA 20379-1 (2-amino-4,5-dihydro-8-phenylimidazo[2,1-b]thiazolo[4,5-g]benzo thi azole), a novel proton pump inhibitor with antiulcer activities, were investigated in mice, rats, guinea pig and rabbits. YJA 20379-1 at oral doses of 50, 100 and 200 mg/kg did not affect the general behaviour, hexobarbital hypnosis, motor coordination and body temperature in mice. The drug does not have analgesic and anticonvulsant action at 200 mg/kg p.o. The locomotor activity was not affected at 100 mg/kg p.o., but at 200 mg/kg, the activity was suppressed.

Author(s): 
Lee, E. B.
Cho, S. I.
Cheon, S. A.
Chang, M. S.
Kim, K. B.
Sohn, S. K.
Chung, Y. K.
Publication Title: 
Annals of Biomedical Engineering

This article studies the problem of controlling the drug administration during an anesthesia process, where muscle relaxation, analgesia, and hypnosis are regulated by means of monitored administration of specific drugs. On the basis of a seventh-order nonlinear pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic representation of the hypnosis process dynamics, a cascade (master/slave) feedback control structure for controlling the bispectral index (BIS) is proposed.

Author(s): 
Puebla, Hector
Alvarez-Ramírez, José
Publication Title: 
Anesthesiology

BACKGROUND: The effects of anesthetics on airway protective reflexes have not been extensively characterized in children. The aim of this study was to compare the laryngeal reflex responses in children anesthetized with either sevoflurane or propofol under two levels of hypnosis using the Bispectral Index score (BIS). The authors hypothesized that the incidence of apnea with laryngospasm evoked by laryngeal stimulation would not differ between sevoflurane and propofol when used in equipotent doses and that laryngeal responsiveness would be diminished with increased levels of hypnosis.

Author(s): 
Oberer, Christine
von Ungern-Sternberg, Britta S.
Frei, Franz J.
Erb, Thomas O.
Publication Title: 
Paediatric Anaesthesia

BACKGROUND: During closed-loop control, a drug infusion is continually adjusted according to a measure of clinical effect (e.g., an electroencephalographic depth of hypnosis (DoH) index). Inconsistency in population-derived pediatric pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic models and the large interpatient variability observed in children suggest a role for closed-loop control in optimizing the administration of intravenous anesthesia.

Author(s): 
West, Nicholas
Dumont, Guy A.
van Heusden, Klaske
Petersen, Christian L.
Khosravi, Sara
Soltesz, Kristian
Umedaly, Aryannah
Reimer, Eleanor
Ansermino, J. Mark

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