Rhinitis

Publication Title: 
The Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews

BACKGROUND: The use of nasal irrigation for the treatment of nose and sinus complaints has its foundations in yogic and homeopathic traditions. There has been increasing use of saline irrigation, douches, sprays and rinsing as an adjunct to the medical management of chronic rhinosinusitis. Treatment strategies often include the use of topical saline from once to more than four times a day. Considerable patient effort is often involved. Any additional benefit has been difficult to discern from other treatments.

Author(s): 
Harvey, R.
Hannan, S. A.
Badia, L.
Scadding, G.
Publication Title: 
Current Allergy and Asthma Reports

The use of saline nasal irrigation (SNI) in the treatment of nasal and sinus disorders has its roots in the yoga tradition and homeopathic medicine. In recent years, SNI has been increasingly observed as concomitant therapy for acute (ARS) and chronic rhinosinusitis (CRS). Various devices are employed, such as nasal douches, neti pots or sprays. The saline solutions used vary in composition and concentration. This article gives a current overview of literature on the clinical efficacy of SNI in the treatment of ARS and CRS.

Author(s): 
Achilles, Nils
Mösges, Ralph
Publication Title: 
Annals of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology: Official Publication of the American College of Allergy, Asthma, & Immunology

LEARNING OBJECTIVES: Reading this article will reinforce the reader's awareness of the adverse effects of medications used for the treatment of rhinitis. DATA SOURCES: Articles on therapy of rhinitis and reports of associated side effects were reviewed. A MEDLINE database using subject keywords was searched from 1992 through 1997. STUDY SELECTION: Pertinent articles were chosen. A distinction was made in the text between controlled studies and case reports.

Author(s): 
Milgrom, H.
Bender, B.
Publication Title: 
Journal of Alternative and Complementary Medicine (New York, N.Y.)

OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy and effectiveness of homeopathic intervention in the treatment of seasonal or perennial allergic rhinitis (AR). METHOD: Randomized controlled trials evaluating all forms of homeopathic treatment for AR were included in a systematic review (SR) of studies published up to and including December 2015. Two authors independently screened potential studies, extracted data, and assessed risk of bias. Primary outcomes included symptom improvement and total quality-of-life score.

Author(s): 
Banerjee, Kushal
Mathie, Robert T.
Costelloe, Ceire
Howick, Jeremy
Publication Title: 
The Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology

Complementary-alternative medicines are extensively used in the treatment of allergic rhinitis and asthma, but evidence-based recommendations are lacking. To provide evidence-based recommendations, the literature was searched by using MedLine and the Cochrane Library to March 2005 (Key words: Asthma [OR] Rhinitis, [AND] Complementary [OR] Alternative Medicine, [OR] Herbal, [OR] Acupuncture, [OR] Homeopathy, [OR] Alternative Treatment). Randomized trials, preferably double-blind and published in English, were selected. The articles were evaluated by a panel of experts.

Author(s): 
Passalacqua, Giovanni
Bousquet, Philippe J.
Carlsen, Kai-Hakon
Kemp, James
Lockey, Richard F.
Niggemann, Bodo
Pawankar, Ruby
Price, David
Bousquet, Jean
Publication Title: 
Harefuah

Patients with respiratory tract infections are frequently treated by complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) modalities. This editorial reviews current literature on the most popular CAM modalities used by these patients: acupuncture, herbal therapy, vitamins and homeopathy. Several good quality trials in acupuncture, herbal therapy and homeopathy have reported positive effects in allergic rhinitis and asthma.

Author(s): 
Gamus, Dorit
Kokia, Ira
Publication Title: 
The Journal of Laryngology and Otology

OBJECTIVE: To assess the evidence surrounding the use of certain complementary supplements in otolaryngology. We specifically focussed on four commonly used supplements: spirulina, Ginkgo biloba, Vertigoheel and nutritional supplements (cod liver oil, multivitamins and pineapple enzyme). MATERIALS AND METHODS: A systematic review of the English and foreign language literature. INCLUSION CRITERIA: in vivo human studies. EXCLUSION CRITERIA: animal trials, in vitro studies and case reports.

Author(s): 
Karkos, P. D.
Leong, S. C.
Arya, A. K.
Papouliakos, S. M.
Apostolidou, M. T.
Issing, W. J.
Publication Title: 
The Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews

BACKGROUND: The use of nasal irrigation for the treatment of nose and sinus complaints has its foundations in yogic and homeopathic traditions. There has been increasing use of saline irrigation, douches, sprays and rinsing as an adjunct to the medical management of chronic rhinosinusitis. Treatment strategies often include the use of topical saline from once to more than four times a day. Considerable patient effort is often involved. Any additional benefit has been difficult to discern from other treatments.

Author(s): 
Harvey, R.
Hannan, S. A.
Badia, L.
Scadding, G.
Publication Title: 
Current Allergy and Asthma Reports

The use of saline nasal irrigation (SNI) in the treatment of nasal and sinus disorders has its roots in the yoga tradition and homeopathic medicine. In recent years, SNI has been increasingly observed as concomitant therapy for acute (ARS) and chronic rhinosinusitis (CRS). Various devices are employed, such as nasal douches, neti pots or sprays. The saline solutions used vary in composition and concentration. This article gives a current overview of literature on the clinical efficacy of SNI in the treatment of ARS and CRS.

Author(s): 
Achilles, Nils
Mösges, Ralph
Publication Title: 
The Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology

Complementary-alternative medicines are extensively used in the treatment of allergic rhinitis and asthma, but evidence-based recommendations are lacking. To provide evidence-based recommendations, the literature was searched by using MedLine and the Cochrane Library to March 2005 (Key words: Asthma [OR] Rhinitis, [AND] Complementary [OR] Alternative Medicine, [OR] Herbal, [OR] Acupuncture, [OR] Homeopathy, [OR] Alternative Treatment). Randomized trials, preferably double-blind and published in English, were selected. The articles were evaluated by a panel of experts.

Author(s): 
Passalacqua, Giovanni
Bousquet, Philippe J.
Carlsen, Kai-Hakon
Kemp, James
Lockey, Richard F.
Niggemann, Bodo
Pawankar, Ruby
Price, David
Bousquet, Jean

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