Risk Management

Publication Title: 
Journal for Healthcare Quality: Official Publication of the National Association for Healthcare Quality

This article describes a knowledge transfer process that was developed by Catholic Health East (CHE), headquartered in Newtown Square, PA, and that focuses upon one indicator of care, physical restraint use, in the skilled nursing/long-term care setting. The values-based process focuses on preserving residents' rights and using comparative data sharing as the basis for identifying opportunities for improvement. Further, it builds upon a collaborative cyclical model employed by all the CHE System's freestanding and hospital-based long-term care facilities.

Author(s): 
Carroll-Solomon, P. A.
Christian, V.
Denny, D. S.
Nordan, V. N.
Therriault, M. F.
Van Wicklen, R.
Publication Title: 
Journal for Healthcare Quality: Official Publication of the National Association for Healthcare Quality

This article describes a knowledge-transfer process developed by Catholic Health East (CHE), headquartered in Newtown Square, PA, and focuses on improving resident safety in the skilled nursing or long-term care setting. How the health system customized and implemented an electronic medical event database to identify opportunities for improvement to prevent future occurrences of adverse events is outlined.

Author(s): 
Carroll-Solomon, Pamela A.
Denny, Diane S.
Publication Title: 
Health Services Research

OBJECTIVE: This research addresses the following types of responses by hospitals to increased financial risk: (a) increases in prices to privately insured patients (testing separately the effects of risk from the effects of "cost-shifting" that depends on level of Medicare payment in relation to case mix-adjusted cost); (b) changes in service mix offered and selectivity in acceptance of patients to reduce risk; and (c) efforts to reduce variation in resource use for those patients admitted.

Author(s): 
Friedman, B.
Farley, D.
Publication Title: 
Journal of Healthcare Risk Management: The Journal of the American Society for Healthcare Risk Management

I've been on the road a bit this summer. Because of the kind generosity of my London broker, Lloyd and Partners, Ltd., I've been allowed the unique opportunity to have an insider's view of the London market. I observed an interesting renewal situation and sat with underwriters in their boxes amid the hallowed (at least to us insurance geeks) trappings of Lloyd's. I spent several lovely days in Hanover with my long-time lead reinsurer, Hanover Re, while trying desperately to keep up with my own work back home.

Author(s): 
Borg, Douglas J.
Publication Title: 
Tijdschrift Voor Psychiatrie

BACKGROUND: Research on aggression in mental health care has focused mainly on patient characteristics, whereas very little research has been done on the characteristics of the care providers in their reporting of aggression. AIM: To study the characteristics of the care providers of an emergency service in relation to the reporting of aggression. METHOD: All emergency service workers( n = 21) in the Uden-Veghel region were asked to complete a neo-pi-r form.

Author(s): 
Penterman, E. J. M.
van der Staak, C. P. F.
Nijman, H. L. I.
Publication Title: 
The American Journal of Clinical Hypnosis

A substantial number of people facing physical and/or psychological crisis report having a near-death experience (NDE) involving a subjectively real experience of an alternate reality. Where NDE content is associated with positive emotions, benefit might be gained by hypnotic recall of the NDE, yet such recall might involve possible risk in the form of reactivation of the original crisis. In this article we describe a study involving hypnotic recall of positive NDEs by one male and five female subjects.

Author(s): 
Holden, J. M.
MacHovec, F.
Publication Title: 
Psychiatric Services (Washington, D.C.)

Controversy over cases involving so-called recovered memories of sexual abuse has threatened to divide the mental health field, just as lawsuits based on recovered memories have sometimes divided children from parents and others. The authors review issues in this controversy, including the role of misdirected advocacy for recovered memory by some practitioners, the distinction between the actual events and patient's narrative truth as a factor in the therapeutic alliance, and the contrast between therapeutic and legal remedies.

Author(s): 
Gutheil, T. G.
Simon, R. I.
Publication Title: 
The American Journal of Clinical Hypnosis

Hypnosis is a psychological intervention tool that can make a gamut of psychological, medical, and dental treatments work more rapidly and effectively. It can also be used profitably with some witnesses, victims, and defendants in forensic and investigative contexts as a data gathering tool. As with any other power tool, its use entails some risks. Since risks cannot be totally avoided, this article examines some ways to minimize the risks of inadvertent adverse or negative consequences as a result of the use of the hypnosis tool.

Author(s): 
Eimer, Bruce N.
Publication Title: 
The American Journal of Clinical Hypnosis

This is an article written for mental health professionals interested in using investigative hypnosis with law enforcement agencies in the effort to enhance the memory of witnesses and victims. Discussion focuses on how to work with law enforcement agencies so as to control for factors that can interfere with recall. Specifics include what police need to know about how to conduct case review, to prepare interviewees, to conduct interviews, and what to do with the results. Case examples are used to illustrate applications of this guidance in actual investigations.

Author(s): 
Hibler, Neil S.
Scheflin, Alan W.
Publication Title: 
The American Journal of Clinical Hypnosis

Recent studies demonstrate that unwanted responses to hypnosis during training workshops are not uncommon, and usually are covert (Kluft, 2012). Adverse events usually occurred subsequent to inadequate realerting from previous experiences of hypnosis. Inadequate realerting almost invariably was associated with unsuccessful permissive instructions for dehypnosis. Further, workshop faculty tended to accept partial dehypnosis as adequate dehypnosis.

Author(s): 
Kluft, Richard P.

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