romantic relationships

Publication Title: 
The Journal of General Psychology

The Investment Model (IM; Rusbult, 1980, 1983) has been widely used to study the development and maintenance of romantic relationships. Its components--satisfaction, quality of alternatives, investment size and commitment--are operationalized in the Investment Model Scale (IMS; Rusbult, Martz, & Agnew, 1998). Given its importance for personal relationships literature, this article presents the adaptation and validation of the IMS to Portugal, and the development and validation of a shorter version, the IMS-S.

Author(s): 
Rodrigues, David
Lopes, Diniz
Publication Title: 
Personality & Social Psychology Bulletin

The authors propose the Model of Self-Determined Sexual Motivation to examine sexual motivation in dating relationships using a Self-Determination Theory (SDT) framework. This model predicted that sexual need satisfaction would mediate the association between self-determined sexual motives and the outcome variables of psychological well-being and relational quality. Three studies tested this model. Study 1 was a cross-sectional study that investigated sexual motivation in dating relationships.

Author(s): 
Brunell, Amy B.
Webster, Gregory D.
Publication Title: 
Social Cognitive and Affective Neuroscience

Empathic communication between couples plays an important role in relationship quality and individual well-being and research has pointed to the role of oxytocin in providing the neurobiological substrate for pair-bonding and empathy. Here, we examined links between genetic variability on the oxytocin receptor gene (OXTR) and empathic behaviour at the initiation of romantic love.

Author(s): 
Schneiderman, Inna
Kanat-Maymon, Yaniv
Ebstein, Richard P.
Feldman, Ruth
Publication Title: 
Journal of Affective Disorders

The present study aimed at investigating the possible changes of some features of loving relationships during long-term treatment of depression with both selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) and tricyclics (TCAs), by means of a specifically designed test, the so-called "Sex, Attachment, Love" (SALT) questionnaire.

Author(s): 
Marazziti, Donatella
Akiskal, Hagop S.
Udo, Mieko
Picchetti, Michela
Baroni, Stefano
Massimetti, Gabriele
Albanese, Francesco
Dell'Osso, Liliana
Publication Title: 
Journal of Adolescence

Rejection sensitivity - the tendency to expect, perceive, and overreact to rejection by others - is linked with individuals' expectations that their romantic partners' behaviors have negative intent, even if, perhaps, such behaviors could be considered neutral when observed by another. The aim of the present study was to test this proposition, derived from rejection sensitivity theory, using a Video-Recall Procedure with adolescent couples in the US (N†=†386 adolescents, 50% girls).

Author(s): 
Norona, Jerika C.
Salvatore, Joseph F.
Welsh, Deborah P.
Darling, Nancy
Publication Title: 
Journal of Adolescence

Using data on 838 middle adolescents, the current study compared the associations between three types of romantic involvement and alcohol, tobacco, and marijuana use. Off-time (i.e., serious romantic relationships) but not on-time (i.e., romantic socializing and dating) types of involvement were expected to be associated with increased odds of using each substance. Participating in romantic socializing was unrelated to substance use and dating was only positively associated with alcohol use.

Author(s): 
Beckmeyer, Jonathon J.
Publication Title: 
Journal of Adolescence

Although Mexican Americans are the largest ethnic minority group in the nation, knowledge is limited regarding this population's adolescent romantic relationships. This study explored whether 12th grade Mexican Americans' (N†=†218; 54% female) romantic relationship characteristics, cultural values, and gender created unique latent classes and if so, whether they were linked to adjustment. Latent class analyses suggested three profiles including, relatively speaking, higher, satisfactory, and lower quality romantic relationships.

Author(s): 
Moosmann, Danyel A. V.
Roosa, Mark W.
Publication Title: 
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America

Across two field studies of romantic attraction, we demonstrate that postural expansiveness makes humans more romantically appealing. In a field study (n = 144 speed-dates), we coded nonverbal behaviors associated with liking, love, and dominance. Postural expansiveness-expanding the body in physical space-was most predictive of attraction, with each one-unit increase in coded behavior from the video recordings nearly doubling a person's odds of getting a "yes" response from one's speed-dating partner.

Author(s): 
Vacharkulksemsuk, Tanya
Reit, Emily
Khambatta, Poruz
Eastwick, Paul W.
Finkel, Eli J.
Carney, Dana R.
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