Rotavirus

Publication Title: 
Veterinary Immunology and Immunopathology

Despite accumulating knowledge of porcine macrophages and dendritic cells (DCs) from in vitro studies, information regarding monocytes/macrophages and DCs in lymphoid tissues of enteric pathogen-infected neonatal animals in vivo is limited. In this study we evaluated the influence of commensal bacterial [two strains of lactic acid bacteria (LAB), Lactobacillus acidophilus and L. reuteri] colonization and rotavirus infection on distribution and frequencies of monocytes/macrophages and conventional DCs (cDCs) in ileum, spleen and blood.

Author(s): 
Zhang, Wei
Wen, Ke
Azevedo, Marli S. P.
Gonzalez, Ana
Saif, Linda J.
Li, Guohua
Yousef, Ahmed E.
Yuan, Lijuan
Publication Title: 
Viral Immunology

Previous studies of epithelial immune responses to rotavirus infection have been conducted in transformed cell lines. In this study, we evaluated a non-transformed porcine jejunum epithelial cell line (IPEC-J2) as an in-vitro model of rotavirus infection and probiotic treatment. Cell-culture-adapted porcine rotavirus (PRV) OSU strain, or human rotavirus (HRV) Wa strain, along with Lactobacillus acidophilus (LA) or Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG (LGG) were used to inoculate IPEC-J2 cells. LA or LGG treatment was applied pre- or post-rotavirus infection.

Author(s): 
Liu, Fangning
Li, Guohua
Wen, Ke
Bui, Tammy
Cao, Dianjun
Zhang, Yanming
Yuan, Lijuan
Publication Title: 
Future Medicinal Chemistry

BACKGROUND: Rotavirus is the leading cause of severe diarrhea disease in newborns and young children worldwide, estimated to be responsible for over 300,000 childhood deaths every year, mostly in developing countries. Rotavirus-related deaths represent approximately 5% of all deaths in children younger than 5 years of age worldwide. Saponins are readily soluble in water and are approved by the US FDA for inclusion in beverages intended for human consumption. The addition of saponins to existing water supplies offers a new form of intervention into the cycle of rotavirus infection.

Author(s): 
Roner, Michael R.
Tam, Ka Ian
Kiesling-Barrager, Melody
Publication Title: 
Antiviral Research

Rotavirus is the leading cause of severe diarrhea disease in newborns and young children worldwide with approximately 300,000 pre-adolescent deaths each year. Quillaja saponins are a natural aqueous extract obtained from the Chilean soapbark tree. The extract is approved for use in humans by the FDA for use in beverages as a food addictive. We have demonstrated that Quillaja extracts have strong antiviral activities in vitro against six different viruses. In this study, we evaluated the in vivo antiviral activity of these extracts against rhesus rotavirus (RRV) using a mouse model.

Author(s): 
Tam, Ka Ian
Roner, Michael R.
Publication Title: 
Journal of Pediatric Gastroenterology and Nutrition

OBJECTIVES: Beneficial microbes and probiotics are promising agents for the prevention and treatment of enteric and diarrheal diseases in children; however, little is known about their in vivo mechanisms of action. We used a neonatal mouse model of rotavirus diarrhea to gain insight into how probiotics ameliorate acute gastroenteritis. METHODS: Rotavirus-infected mice were treated with 1 of 2 strains of human-derived Lactobacillus reuteri.

Author(s): 
Preidis, Geoffrey A.
Saulnier, Delphine M.
Blutt, Sarah E.
Mistretta, Toni-Ann
Riehle, Kevin P.
Major, Angela M.
Venable, Susan F.
Barrish, James P.
Finegold, Milton J.
Petrosino, Joseph F.
Guerrant, Richard L.
Conner, Margaret E.
Versalovic, James
Publication Title: 
Beneficial Microbes

Probiotic lactic acid bacteria (LAB) have been shown to alleviate inflammation, enhance the immunogenicity of rotavirus vaccines, or reduce the severity of rotavirus diarrhoea. Although the mechanisms are not clear, the differential Th1/Th2/Th3-driving capacities and modulating effects on cytokine production of different LAB strains may be the key. Our goal was to delineate the influence of combining two probiotic strains of Lactobacillus acidophilus and Lactobacillus reuteri on the development of cytokine responses in neonatal gnotobiotic pigs infected with human rotavirus (HRV).

Author(s): 
Azevedo, M. S. P.
Zhang, W.
Wen, K.
Gonzalez, A. M.
Saif, L. J.
Yousef, A. E.
Yuan, L.
Publication Title: 
Virology Journal

BACKGROUND: Glycyrrhizin (GA) and primary metabolite 18β-glycyrrhetinic acid (GRA) are pharmacologically active components of the medicinal licorice root, and both have been shown to have antiviral and immunomodulatory properties. Although these properties are well established, the mechanisms of action are not completely understood. In this study, GA and GRA were tested for the ability to inhibit rotavirus replication in cell culture, toward a long term goal of discovering natural compounds that may complement existing vaccines.

Author(s): 
Hardy, Michele E.
Hendricks, Jay M.
Paulson, Jeana M.
Faunce, Nicholas R.
Publication Title: 
PloS One

Glycyrrhizin, an abundant bioactive component of the medicinal licorice root is rapidly metabolized by gut commensal bacteria into 18β-glycyrrhetinic acid (GRA). Either or both of these compounds have been shown to have antiviral, anti-hepatotoxic, anti-ulcerative, anti-tumor, anti-allergenic and anti-inflammatory activity in vitro or in vivo. In this study, the ability of GRA to modulate immune responses at the small intestinal mucosa when delivered orally was investigated.

Author(s): 
Hendricks, Jay M.
Hoffman, Carol
Pascual, David W.
Hardy, Michele E.
Publication Title: 
Vaccine

Breast milk (colostrum [col]/milk) components and gut commensals play important roles in neonatal immune maturation, establishment of gut homeostasis and immune responses to enteric pathogens and oral vaccines. We investigated the impact of colonization by probiotics, Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG (LGG) and Bifidobacterium lactis Bb12 (Bb12) with/without col/milk (mimicking breast/formula fed infants) on B lymphocyte responses to an attenuated (Att) human rotavirus (HRV) Wa strain vaccine in a neonatal gnotobiotic pig model.

Author(s): 
Chattha, Kuldeep S.
Vlasova, Anastasia N.
Kandasamy, Sukumar
Esseili, Malak A.
Siegismund, Christine
Rajashekara, Gireesh
Saif, Linda J.
Publication Title: 
PloS One

The effects of co-colonization with Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG (LGG) and Bifidobacterium lactis Bb12 (Bb12) on 3-dose vaccination with attenuated HRV and challenge with virulent human rotavirus (VirHRV) were assessed in 4 groups of gnotobiotic (Gn) pigs: Pro+Vac (probiotic-colonized/vaccinated), Vac (vaccinated), Pro (probiotic-colonized, non-vaccinated) and Control (non-colonized, non-vaccinated). Subsets of pigs were euthanized pre- [post-challenge day (PCD) 0] and post (PCD7)-VirHRV challenge to assess diarrhea, fecal HRV shedding and dendritic cell/innate immune responses.

Author(s): 
Vlasova, Anastasia N.
Chattha, Kuldeep S.
Kandasamy, Sukumar
Liu, Zhe
Esseili, Malak
Shao, Lulu
Rajashekara, Gireesh
Saif, Linda J.

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