Scotland

Publication Title: 
Homeopathy: The Journal of the Faculty of Homeopathy

This comparative quantitative study explored General Practitioners' (GPs) attitudes to homeopathy in Dumfries and Galloway, a predominantly rural area in South West Scotland where there is a local British Homeopathic Association Funded Homeopathic Clinic. It aimed to determine whether there was an association between expressed attitudes to homeopathy and a number of variables. Issues arising from the House of Lords Report on CAM were also explored. A self-administered questionnaire was addressed to all 135 GPs within Dumfries and Galloway.

Author(s): 
Hamilton, E.
Publication Title: 
Journal of Alternative and Complementary Medicine (New York, N.Y.)

Homeopathy is a branch of Western medicine that has mostly been rejected by Western orthodoxy for the last 200 years because of conceptual and scientific clashes. Homeopathy uses microdoses of potential toxins to provoke defense and self-regulatory responses, rather than the more orthodox approach of blocking body reactions. This approach hints at its clinical scope: it can help, at times resolve, conditions that are intrinsically reversible rather than mechanical problems, deficiencies, or irreversible breakdowns in body functions where it is only palliative.

Author(s): 
Reilly, D.
Publication Title: 
Nutrition and Health
Author(s): 
Steven, M.
Publication Title: 
Social Science & Medicine (1982)

In common with some other ethnic and religious minorities whose forebears migrated from their country of origin, Irish Catholics in Britain are less well off than the host population in terms of socio-economic position and health. Results are presented from a Scottish study, where Catholic religion of origin mainly indicates Irish ancestry, and it is estimated that about one-third of the population is of significant Irish descent.

Author(s): 
Abbotts, J.
Williams, R.
Ford, G.
Publication Title: 
Health Bulletin

OBJECTIVE: Catholic adults in the West of Scotland, who are mainly of Irish origin, have been shown to suffer excess morbidity and mortality compared to the general population. A major contributing factor to this inequality is socio-economic disadvantage. This paper investigates the health and socio-economic position of Catholics in the youngest generation. DESIGN: Secondary analysis of baseline data from the West of Scotland 11-16 STUDY: Teenage Health, which is a longitudinal school-based survey. SETTING: One hundred and thirty five primary schools in Glasgow and surrounding districts.

Author(s): 
Abbotts, J.
Williams, R.
Sweeting, H.
West, P.
Publication Title: 
Sociology of Health & Illness

This paper considers the ways in which accounts from Glasgow Catholics diverge from those of Protestants and explores the reasons why people leave jobs, including health grounds. Accounts reveal experiences distinctive to Catholics, of health-threatening stress, obstacles to career progression within (mainly) private-sector organisations, and interactional difficulties which create particular problems for (mainly) middle class men. This narrows the employment options for upwardly mobile Catholics, who may then resort to self-employment or other similarly stressful options.

Author(s): 
Walls, Patricia
Williams, Rory
Publication Title: 
Journal of Public Health (Oxford, England)

BACKGROUND: Many theories have been proposed to explain the high levels of 'excess' mortality (i.e. higher mortality over and above that explained by differences in socio-economic circumstances) shown in Scotland-and, especially, in its largest city, Glasgow-compared with elsewhere in the UK. One such proposal relates to differences in optimism, given previously reported evidence of the health benefits of an optimistic outlook. METHODS: A representative survey of Glasgow, Liverpool and Manchester was undertaken in 2011.

Author(s): 
Walsh, David
McCartney, Gerry
McCullough, Sarah
van der Pol, Marjon
Buchanan, Duncan
Jones, Russell
Publication Title: 
Supportive Care in Cancer: Official Journal of the Multinational Association of Supportive Care in Cancer

PURPOSE: The aim of this study is to examine the association between optimism and psychological distress in women with breast cancer after taking into account their self-rated general health. METHODS: Data were aggregated from the Scottish Health Survey (2008 to 2011) to derive a nationally representative sample of 12,255 women (11,960 cancer-free controls, and 295 breast cancer cases identified from linked cancer registry data). The explanatory variables were optimism and general health, and the outcome variable was symptoms of psychological distress.

Author(s): 
Leung, Janni
Atherton, Iain
Kyle, Richard G.
Hubbard, Gill
McLaughlin, Deirdre
Publication Title: 
Culture, Health & Sexuality

This paper examines discourse on serodiscordant relationships in interviews with 16 HIV-positive and 3 HIV-negative gay men living in Scotland. Drawing on critiques concerning love, reason and HIV serostatus normativity, this paper supplies a much-needed insight into how gay men in serodiscordant relationships negotiate HIV prevention. Among other matters, some HIV-negative men were said to knowingly request risky sex with their HIV-positive partners as an expression of love.

Author(s): 
Davis, Mark
Flowers, Paul
Publication Title: 
Issues in Mental Health Nursing

This study describes the psychological problems of heart transplant recipients. Using a qualitative research approach, interviews were conducted with 42 patients(35 men and 7 women). Analysis of the data revealed concerns about the donor's heart and how receiving somebody else's heart might affect the recipient's own personality; feelings of guilt for the donor's death and feelings of gratitude towards the donor's family; and concerns about the recipient's own heart.

Author(s): 
Kaba, Evridiki
Thompson, David R.
Burnard, Philip
Edwards, Deborah
Theodosopoulou, Eleni

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