Sedentary Lifestyle

Publication Title: 
Journal of Epidemiology and Community Health

BACKGROUND: Despite different levels of economic development, Costa Rica and the USA have similar mortalities among adults. However, in the USA there are substantial differences in mortality by educational attainment, and in Costa Rica there are only minor differences. This contrast motivates an examination of behavioural and biological correlates underlying this difference.

Author(s): 
Rehkopf, David H.
Dow, William H.
Rosero-Bixby, Luis
Publication Title: 
Health and Quality of Life Outcomes

BACKGROUND: Nutrition and physical activity are major determinants of health and quality of life; however, there exists little research focusing on determinants of these behaviours in older adults. This is important, since just as these behaviours vary according to subpopulation, it is likely that the determinants also vary.

Author(s): 
McNaughton, Sarah A.
Crawford, David
Ball, Kylie
Salmon, Jo
Publication Title: 
Maturitas

With ageing populations a major challenge is to maintain physical and cognitive function, quality of life and independence. The literature does not only indicate important gender differences in lifestyle behaviours, but also how these behaviours might affect health outcomes. The current review has a male perspective when exploring lifestyle predictors of healthy ageing, such as physical activity and sedentary behaviours, smoking, diet and alcohol consumption.

Author(s): 
Sˆdergren, Marita
Publication Title: 
Social Science & Medicine (1982)

The purpose of this study was to examine the association between socioeconomic status (SES) and leukocyte telomere length (LTL) - a marker of cell aging that has been linked to stressful life circumstances - in a nationally representative, socioeconomically and ethnically diverse sample of US adults aged 20-84. Using data from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES), 1999-2002, we found that respondents who completed less than a high school education had significantly shorter telomeres than those who graduated from college. Income was not associated with LTL.

Author(s): 
Needham, Belinda L.
Adler, Nancy
Gregorich, Steven
Rehkopf, David
Lin, Jue
Blackburn, Elizabeth H.
Epel, Elissa S.
Publication Title: 
PloS One

BACKGROUND: Chronic psychological stress is associated with detrimental effects on physical health, and may operate in part through accelerated cell aging, as indexed by shorter telomeres at the ends of chromosomes. However, not all people under stress have distinctly short telomeres, and we examined whether exercise can serve a stress-buffering function. We predicted that chronic stress would be related to short telomere length (TL) in sedentary individuals, whereas in those who exercise, stress would not have measurable effects on telomere shortening.

Author(s): 
Puterman, Eli
Lin, Jue
Blackburn, Elizabeth
O'Donovan, Aoife
Adler, Nancy
Epel, Elissa
Publication Title: 
Social Science & Medicine (1982)

The purpose of this study was to examine the association between socioeconomic status (SES) and leukocyte telomere length (LTL) - a marker of cell aging that has been linked to stressful life circumstances - in a nationally representative, socioeconomically and ethnically diverse sample of US adults aged 20-84. Using data from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES), 1999-2002, we found that respondents who completed less than a high school education had significantly shorter telomeres than those who graduated from college. Income was not associated with LTL.

Author(s): 
Needham, Belinda L.
Adler, Nancy
Gregorich, Steven
Rehkopf, David
Lin, Jue
Blackburn, Elizabeth H.
Epel, Elissa S.
Publication Title: 
Psychosomatic Medicine

OBJECTIVE: Physically active individuals have lower rates of morbidity and mortality, and recent evidence indicates that physical activity may be particularly beneficial to those experiencing chronic stress. The tendency to ruminate increases and prolongs physiological stress responses, including hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis responses as indexed by cortisol reactivity to stressful experiences.

Author(s): 
Puterman, Eli
O'Donovan, Aoife
Adler, Nancy E.
Tomiyama, A. Janet
Kemeny, Margaret
Wolkowitz, Owen M.
Epel, Elissa
Publication Title: 
PloS One

BACKGROUND: Chronic psychological stress is associated with detrimental effects on physical health, and may operate in part through accelerated cell aging, as indexed by shorter telomeres at the ends of chromosomes. However, not all people under stress have distinctly short telomeres, and we examined whether exercise can serve a stress-buffering function. We predicted that chronic stress would be related to short telomere length (TL) in sedentary individuals, whereas in those who exercise, stress would not have measurable effects on telomere shortening.

Author(s): 
Puterman, Eli
Lin, Jue
Blackburn, Elizabeth
O'Donovan, Aoife
Adler, Nancy
Epel, Elissa
Publication Title: 
Journal of Biological Regulators and Homeostatic Agents

There is increasing evidence that psychosocial stress can be viewed as a system-wide derangement of cellular homeostasis, with heightened oxidative stress and triggered proinflammatory mechanisms. The aim of this study is twofold: a) to replicate findings that psychological stress increases oxidative damage and b) to determine whether a fermented papaya preparation known to exert significant protective antioxidant properties could buffer such increases in nuclear DNA damage while also inducing epigenetic protective mechanisms.

Author(s): 
Marotta, F.
Naito, Y.
Padrini, F.
Xuewei, X.
Jain, S.
Soresi, V.
Zhou, L.
Catanzaro, R.
Zhong, K.
Polimeni, A.
Chui, D. H.
Publication Title: 
International Journal of Yoga Therapy

BACKGROUND: With the current challenge of rapidly aging populations, practices such as yoga may help older adults stay physically active, healthy, and fulfilled. METHODS: The impact of an 8-week Iyengar yoga program on the holistic health and well-being of physically inactive people aged 55 years and over was assessed. Thirty-eight older adults (mean age 73.21±8.38 years; 19 intervention, 19 control) engaged in either twice-weekly yoga classes or continued their usual daily routines.

Author(s): 
Vogler, Juliane
O'Hara, Lily
Gregg, Jane
Burnell, Fiona

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