Self Care

Publication Title: 
The American Journal of Occupational Therapy: Official Publication of the American Occupational Therapy Association

OBJECTIVE: We reviewed the efficacy of occupational therapy-related interventions for adults with rheumatoid arthritis. METHOD: We examined 51 Level I studies (19 physical activity, 32 psychoeducational) published 2000-2014 and identified from five databases. Interventions that focused solely on the upper or lower extremities were not included. RESULTS: Findings related to key outcomes (activities of daily living, ability, pain, fatigue, depression, self-efficacy, disease symptoms) are presented. Strong evidence supports the use of aerobic exercise, resistive exercise, and aquatic therapy.

Author(s): 
Siegel, Patricia
Tencza, Melissa
Apodaca, Beverly
Poole, Janet L.
Publication Title: 
Pain Medicine (Malden, Mass.)

CONTEXT: Self-management strategies for pain hold substantial promise as a means of reducing pain and improving function among older adults with chronic pain, but their use in this age group has not been well defined. OBJECTIVE: To review the evidence regarding self-management interventions for pain due to musculoskeletal disorders among older adults.

Author(s): 
Reid, M. Carrington
Papaleontiou, Maria
Ong, Anthony
Breckman, Risa
Wethington, Elaine
Pillemer, Karl
Publication Title: 
Journal of Manipulative and Physiological Therapeutics

OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of unloaded movement facilitation exercises on outcomes for people with nonspecific chronic low back pain (NSCLBP). METHODS: This systematic review was conducted according to Cochrane Back Review Group and Quality of Reporting of Meta-analyses (QUORUM) guidelines. Exercise effects were reported as standardized mean difference (SMD) with 95% confidence intervals (95% CI). RESULTS: Six high-quality randomized controlled trials were included.

Author(s): 
Slade, Susan C.
Keating, Jennifer L.
Publication Title: 
Journal of Affective Disorders

BACKGROUND: In Obsessive Compulsive Disorder (OCD) current standard pharmacotherapies may be of limited efficacy. Non-conventional interventions such as Complementary and Alternative Medicine (CAM), self-help techniques, and lifestyle interventions are commonly used by sufferers of OCD, however to date no systematic review of this specific area exists. METHODS: We conducted a systematic review of studies using CAM, self-help, and lifestyle interventions for treatment of OCD and trichotillomania (TTM).

Author(s): 
Sarris, Jerome
Camfield, David
Berk, Michael
Publication Title: 
Acta Obstetricia Et Gynecologica Scandinavica

OBJECTIVE: To explore the effect of physiotherapeutic interventions on pregnancy-related lumbopelvic pain. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Data sources: MEDLINE, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, PEDro, CINAHL, AMED, and SCOPUS databases were searched up to December 2014 for studies written in English, French, German or Scandinavian languages that evaluated physiotherapeutic modalities for preventing and treating pregnancy-related lumbopelvic pain. RESULTS: For lumbopelvic pain during pregnancy, the evidence was strong for positive effects of acupuncture and pelvic belts.

Author(s): 
Gutke, Annelie
Betten, Carola
Degerskär, Kristina
Pousette, Sara
Olsen, Monika Fagevik
Publication Title: 
Annals of Internal Medicine

RECOMMENDATION 1: Clinicians should conduct a focused history and physical examination to help place patients with low back pain into 1 of 3 broad categories: nonspecific low back pain, back pain potentially associated with radiculopathy or spinal stenosis, or back pain potentially associated with another specific spinal cause. The history should include assessment of psychosocial risk factors, which predict risk for chronic disabling back pain (strong recommendation, moderate-quality evidence).

Author(s): 
Chou, Roger
Qaseem, Amir
Snow, Vincenza
Casey, Donald
Cross, J. Thomas
Shekelle, Paul
Owens, Douglas K.
Clinical Efficacy Assessment Subcommittee of the American College of Physicians
American College of Physicians
American Pain Society Low Back Pain Guidelines Panel
Publication Title: 
BMJ open

OBJECTIVES: Optimal control of type 2 diabetes is challenging in many patient populations including in South Asian patients. We systematically reviewed studies on the effect of diabetes management interventions targeted at South Asian patients with type 2 diabetes on glycaemic control. DESIGN: Systematic review of MEDLINE, EMBASE and CINAHL databases for randomised controlled trials (RCTs) and pre-post-test studies (January 1990 to February 2014). Studies were stratified by where interventions were conducted (South Asia vs Western countries).

Author(s): 
Bhurji, N.
Javer, J.
Gasevic, D.
Khan, N. A.
Publication Title: 
Journal of Perianesthesia Nursing: Official Journal of the American Society of PeriAnesthesia Nurses

Complementary and alternative therapies have enjoyed increasingly widespread use in recent years. Because of this trend, we were eager to obtain a better grasp on the actual number of people in our hospital's pain clinic who have used these modalities. In an effort to explore the use of complementary/alternative medicine (CAM) by patients seen in an anesthesiology chronic pain clinic, we conducted a study using a questionnaire. This questionnaire contained two sections, one covering complementary/alternative modalities and the other dealing with herbals or nutraceuticals.

Author(s): 
Konvicka, James J.
Meyer, Tricia A.
McDavid, Andrew J.
Roberson, Charles R.
Publication Title: 
BMJ open

OBJECTIVES: Optimal control of type 2 diabetes is challenging in many patient populations including in South Asian patients. We systematically reviewed studies on the effect of diabetes management interventions targeted at South Asian patients with type 2 diabetes on glycaemic control. DESIGN: Systematic review of MEDLINE, EMBASE and CINAHL databases for randomised controlled trials (RCTs) and pre-post-test studies (January 1990 to February 2014). Studies were stratified by where interventions were conducted (South Asia vs Western countries).

Author(s): 
Bhurji, N.
Javer, J.
Gasevic, D.
Khan, N. A.
Publication Title: 
Family Practice

Background: Self-medication is commonly practised by patients, underpinned by health beliefs that affect their adherence to medication regimens, and impacting on treatment outcomes. Objectives: This review explores the scope of self-medication practices among people with hypertension, in terms of the scale of use, types of medication and influencing factors. Method: A comprehensive search of English language, peer-reviewed literature published between 2000 and 2014 was performed.

Author(s): 
Rahmawati, Riana
Bajorek, Beata V.

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