Self Medication

Publication Title: 
The Medical Journal of Australia

OBJECTIVES: To review the evidence for the effectiveness of complementary and self-help treatments for anxiety disorders. DATA SOURCES: Systematic literature search using PubMed, PsycLit, and the Cochrane Library. DATA SYNTHESIS: 108 treatments were identified and grouped under the categories of medicines and homoeopathic remedies, physical treatments, lifestyle, and dietary changes.

Author(s): 
Jorm, Anthony F.
Christensen, Helen
Griffiths, Kathleen M.
Parslow, Ruth A.
Rodgers, Bryan
Blewitt, Kelly A.
Publication Title: 
Family Practice

Background: Self-medication is commonly practised by patients, underpinned by health beliefs that affect their adherence to medication regimens, and impacting on treatment outcomes. Objectives: This review explores the scope of self-medication practices among people with hypertension, in terms of the scale of use, types of medication and influencing factors. Method: A comprehensive search of English language, peer-reviewed literature published between 2000 and 2014 was performed.

Author(s): 
Rahmawati, Riana
Bajorek, Beata V.
Publication Title: 
BMC public health

BACKGROUND: Owing to the stigma associated with sexually transmitted infections, patients may prefer to keep their illness private, and choose instead to try self-treatment remedies from the internet. However, such remedies may prove hazardous if the sellers do not provide detailed advice on adverse effects, or on avoiding transmission and re-infection. We conducted an internet search to determine the availability of treatments for STIs and the nature of information provided by vendors of these treatments.

Author(s): 
Vivancos, Roberto
Schelenz, Silke
Loke, Yoon K.
Publication Title: 
The British Journal of Dermatology

Complementary medicine (CM) is more popular than ever before. Dermatology has not remained unaffected by this trend. The aim of this systematic review was to summarize all surveys of dermatological patients regarding the usage of CM. Three independent literature searches were carried out. Data were extracted in a predefined, standardized way and evaluated descriptively. Seven surveys met the inclusion/exclusion criteria. Collectively they show a high but variable prevalence of CM. Lifetime prevalence ranged from 35 to 69%.

Author(s): 
Ernst, E.
Publication Title: 
The Medical Journal of Australia

OBJECTIVES: To review the evidence for the effectiveness of complementary and self-help treatments for anxiety disorders. DATA SOURCES: Systematic literature search using PubMed, PsycLit, and the Cochrane Library. DATA SYNTHESIS: 108 treatments were identified and grouped under the categories of medicines and homoeopathic remedies, physical treatments, lifestyle, and dietary changes.

Author(s): 
Jorm, Anthony F.
Christensen, Helen
Griffiths, Kathleen M.
Parslow, Ruth A.
Rodgers, Bryan
Blewitt, Kelly A.
Publication Title: 
Journal of Psychosocial Nursing and Mental Health Services

1. Homeopathy is an accepted form of health care in many countries worldwide. 2. Homeopathy is deeply healing, yet does so without causing side effects, tolerance, or addiction problems. 3. Homeopathic remedies are available over the counter in health food stores and some pharmacies. 4. Homeopathy is distinct from herbal medicine and does not interact with conventional treatments.

Author(s): 
Lennihan, Begabati
Publication Title: 
Homeopathy: The Journal of the Faculty of Homeopathy

This paper proposes the emergent entanglement theory of homeopathy. This is based on the lack of evidence that choice of homeopathic medicine is important and predicts links between effectiveness of homeopathic medicines and their manufacturers. It predicts that there will be a consistent variation, in terms of outcome, between homeopaths, and between medicines made by different manufacturers, but not the specific homeopathic medicines prescribed. This theory is potentially testable.

Author(s): 
Hyland, M. E.
Publication Title: 
The Medical Journal of Australia

OBJECTIVES: To review the evidence for the effectiveness of complementary and self-help treatments for anxiety disorders. DATA SOURCES: Systematic literature search using PubMed, PsycLit, and the Cochrane Library. DATA SYNTHESIS: 108 treatments were identified and grouped under the categories of medicines and homoeopathic remedies, physical treatments, lifestyle, and dietary changes.

Author(s): 
Jorm, Anthony F.
Christensen, Helen
Griffiths, Kathleen M.
Parslow, Ruth A.
Rodgers, Bryan
Blewitt, Kelly A.
Publication Title: 
Psychiatry

Psychoanalytic theorists concerned with substance abuse suggest that the affect tolerance and affect expression of addicts are impaired due to preverbal influences. However, psychoanalytic contributions have largely been limited to clinical speculations and case study reports. The present study investigated the hypotheses that opiate abusers will demonstrate more impaired affect tolerance and affect expression than cocaine abusers, and that both groups would appear more impaired than a sample of normals.

Author(s): 
Keller, D. S.
Wilson, A.
Publication Title: 
Primary Care

Numerous vitamins, herbs, supplements, and other agents are readily available for the treatment of diabetes and obesity. Many of these products have little evidence-based medical support to prove the efficacy of these supplements. The physician must be aware that their patients are using these products and must be knowledgeable about their side effects and drug-herb interactions. Our patients have tremendous access to medical information in the lay literature and on the internet. They are using this information to gain access to various diet therapies.

Author(s): 
Roth, Alan

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