Self Mutilation

Publication Title: 
Social Science & Medicine (1982)

The apocalyptic threat of AIDS, combined with recent ethnological developments, is promoting an anthropological "rediscovery of sex." If this rediscovery is to have important and lasting effects on the development of theory, a stock-taking is in order--one which examines anthropology's historical, methodological, and practical relationship to the study of sexual behavior.

Author(s): 
Tuzin, D.
Publication Title: 
The American Journal of Clinical Hypnosis
Author(s): 
Barker, J. C.
Lucas, S.
Publication Title: 
Archives of General Psychiatry

Evidence exists to support the concept of pathology or diseases of hypnosis. Multiple personalities is such a syndrome, as are many or perhaps all cases of hysteria (Briquet's syndrome). The crux of multiple personalities is the subject's unrecognized abuse of self-hypnosis, by which she creates personalities, beginning at age 4 to 6 years. The process of self-hypnosis allows the delegation of an experience or a function to an alter ago, henceforth relegated to unconsciousness by the amnesia of hypnosis.

Author(s): 
Bliss, E. L.
Publication Title: 
Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology

Psychosomatic dermatology is practiced in some manner by every dermatologist. In spite of this, there has been a virtual void in the literature from the middle 1950s until the present time. The relationship to physiologic phenomena, as well as a classification of psychosomatic dermatology, is reviewed.

Author(s): 
Medansky, R. S.
Handler, R. M.
Publication Title: 
American Journal of Psychotherapy

Hypnotic techniques can add to effective therapy with self-cutting patients, but only in the context of a strong, communicative, and flexible relationship. "Neutral hypnosis" and relaxation techniques can be employed to counteract the frightening depersonalization that leads to the cutting. In turn, techniques of uncovering and controlled regression are possible.

Author(s): 
Malon, D. W.
Berardi, D.
Publication Title: 
The American Journal of Clinical Hypnosis

The definition of self-injurious behavior applies to persons who hurt or harm themselves without the motive of suicide or of sexual deviation. The different aspects of self-injurious behavior and the theories explaining them are reviewed. For 5 years a young, intelligent woman had inflicted injuries upon herself with sharp instruments while ostensibly caring for her face and legs.

Author(s): 
Orian, C.
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