Sensory Deprivation

Publication Title: 
Psychoneuroendocrinology

For the present purpose, love is defined as one's having stimulation that one desires. The nature of the stimulation can range on a continuum from the most abstract cognitive, to the most direct sensory, forms. Thus, this definition of love encompasses having an emotional bond with a person for whom one yearns, as well as having sensory stimulation that one desires. We address some of the physiological and perceptual consequences both of having, and of not having, love.

Author(s): 
Komisaruk, B. R.
Whipple, B.
Publication Title: 
Archives of General Psychiatry
Author(s): 
Levitt, E. E.
Brady, J. P.
Ottinger, D. R.
Hinesley, R.
Publication Title: 
Perceptual and Motor Skills
Author(s): 
Rossi, A. M.
Sturrock, J. B.
Solomon, P.
Publication Title: 
Journal of Neurology, Neurosurgery, and Psychiatry
Author(s): 
Halliday, A. M.
Mason, A. A.
Publication Title: 
Journal of Consulting Psychology
Author(s): 
Zuckerman, M.
Schultz, D. P.
Hopkins, T. R.
Publication Title: 
Perceptual and Motor Skills
Author(s): 
Sanders, R. S.
Reyher, J.
Publication Title: 
The International Journal of Clinical and Experimental Hypnosis
Author(s): 
Wickramasekera, I.
Publication Title: 
Journal of Abnormal Psychology
Author(s): 
Wickramasekera, I.
Publication Title: 
Minerva Medica
Author(s): 
Guantieri, G.
Publication Title: 
Perceptual and Motor Skills

Detection efficiency of humans deteriorates rapidly in a variety of monotonous monitoring tasks. The experiment was performed to determine whether or not superior vigilance performance could be obtained through hypnosis in the context of perceptual deprivation. Subjects, forty U.S. Navy personnel, were divided into four groups. Subjects worked on a simulated radar target-detection task before and after one of four treatments.

Author(s): 
Barabasz, A. F.

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