Sensory Thresholds

Publication Title: 
Cancer Chemotherapy and Pharmacology

PURPOSE: Chemoneuropathy remains a painful, burdensome complication of cancer treatment for patients receiving a range of chemotherapeutics, yet the cause and persistence of this condition are not fully documented. This study was designed to quantify the longevity of and contributions to neuropathy following treatment with the plant alkaloids paclitaxel and vincristine.

Author(s): 
Boyette-Davis, Jessica A.
Cata, Juan P.
Driver, Larry C.
Novy, Diane M.
Bruel, Brian M.
Mooring, Deidre L.
Wendelschafer-Crabb, Gwen
Kennedy, William R.
Dougherty, Patrick M.
Publication Title: 
Schizophrenia Bulletin

Among the sensory modalities, olfaction is most closely associated with the frontal and temporal brain regions that are implicated in schizophrenia and most intimately related to the affective and mnemonic functions that these regions subserve. Olfactory probes may therefore be ideal tools through which to assess the structural and functional integrity of the neural substrates that underlie disease-related cognitive and emotional disturbances.

Author(s): 
Turetsky, Bruce I.
Hahn, Chang-Gyu
Borgmann-Winter, Karin
Moberg, Paul J.
Publication Title: 
Journal of Abnormal Psychology

Two experiments compared placebo and hypnotic analgesia in high and low hypnotizable subjects. Experiment 1 demonstrated that hypnotic and placebo analgesia were equally ineffective in low hypnotizables, but that hypnotic analgesia was much more effective than placebo analgesia in high hypnotizables. Experiment 2 replicated these results, but also included low and high hypnotizables who were given a nonhypnotic suggestion for analgesia.

Author(s): 
Spanos, N. P.
Perlini, A. H.
Robertson, L. A.
Publication Title: 
Activitas Nervosa Superior
Author(s): 
Hájek, P.
Jakoubek, B.
Radil, T.
Adamovská, E.
Publication Title: 
Perceptual and Motor Skills

Gradual increase in cutaneous pain threshold was found in healthy subjects and patients with atopic eczema during repeated hypnotic sessions with specific suggestions. This increase was less in the former than in the latter group. Repeated threshold measurements did not influence the threshold. The analgesic effect outlasted the hypnotic sessions by several months. It could be, however, suddenly reduced by appropriate hypnotic suggestion.

Author(s): 
Hájek, P.
Jakoubek, B.
Radil, T.
Publication Title: 
Pain

The ability to reduce both clinically and experimentally induced pain by hypnotic suggestion of analgesia is well known. However, the nature of hypnotic analgesia still remains uncertain. Attempts to demonstrate and identify specific psychophysiological mechanisms have, so far, been unsatisfactory. Methodological problems in inducing pain and monitoring physiological responses may be the reason for this lack of success. In the present study, we have attempted to eliminate some of these methodological problems.

Author(s): 
Arendt-Nielsen, L.
Zachariae, R.
Bjerring, P.
Publication Title: 
Gut

Fifteen patients with the irritable bowel syndrome were studied to assess the effect of hypnotherapy on anorectal physiology. In comparison with a control group of 15 patients who received no hypnotherapy significant changes in rectal sensitivity were found in patients with diarrhoea-predominant irritable bowel syndrome both after a course of hypnotherapy and during a session of hypnosis (p less than 0.05). Although patient numbers were small, a trend towards normalisation of rectal sensitivity was also observed in patients with constipation-predominant irritable bowel syndrome.

Author(s): 
Prior, A.
Colgan, S. M.
Whorwell, P. J.
Publication Title: 
Pain
Author(s): 
Gracely, R. H.
Publication Title: 
Regional Anesthesia and Pain Medicine

BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Hypnosis has been reported to induce analgesia and to facilitate anesthesia. To date, hypnotic-induced analgesia has had little explanation and it has even been questioned. The current study was thus designed to investigate the effect of hypnotic suggestion on thermal-detection thresholds, heat pain, and heat-pain tolerance thresholds. METHODS: In 15 healthy volunteers, enrolled in a randomized cross-over study, thermal thresholds were investigated in 2 sequences of measurements, under waking and hypnotic states, using a thermal stimulator.

Author(s): 
Langlade, Agnès
Jussiau, Claire
Lamonerie, Laurent
Marret, Emmanuel
Bonnet, Francis
Publication Title: 
Gut

BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: We have previously shown that hypnosis can be used to study the effect of different emotions on the motility of the gastrointestinal tract. These studies demonstrated that both anger and excitement increased colonic motility while happiness led to a reduction. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of hypnotically induced emotion on the visceral sensitivity of the gut.

Author(s): 
Houghton, L. A.
Calvert, E. L.
Jackson, N. A.
Cooper, P.
Whorwell, P. J.

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