Single-Blind Method

Publication Title: 
Complementary Therapies in Clinical Practice

A systematic review revealed three small randomised controlled trials of yoga for low back pain, all of which showed effects on back pain that favoured the yoga group. To build on these studies a larger trial, with longer term follow-up, and a number of different yoga teachers delivering the intervention is required. This study protocol describes the details of a randomised controlled trial (RCT) to determine the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of Yoga for chronic Low Back Pain, which is funded by Arthritis Research Campaign (arc) and is being conducted by the University of York.

Author(s): 
Cox, Helen
Tilbrook, Helen
Aplin, John
Chuang, Ling-Hsiang
Hewitt, Catherine
Jayakody, Shalmini
Semlyen, Anna
Soares, Marta O.
Torgerson, David
Trewhela, Alison
Watt, Ian
Worthy, Gill
Publication Title: 
Journal of Clinical Epidemiology

BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVE: To conduct a pilot study to compare the frequency of errors that accompany single vs. double data extraction, compare the estimate of treatment effect derived from these methods, and compare the time requirements for these methods. METHODS: Reviewers were randomized to the role of data extractor or data verifier, and were blind to the study hypothesis. The frequency of errors associated with each method of data extraction was compared using the McNemar test.

Author(s): 
Buscemi, Nina
Hartling, Lisa
Vandermeer, Ben
Tjosvold, Lisa
Klassen, Terry P.
Publication Title: 
Health Technology Assessment (Winchester, England)

BACKGROUND: Individuals with a history of recurrent depression have a high risk of repeated depressive relapse/recurrence. Maintenance antidepressant medication (m-ADM) for at least 2 years is the current recommended treatment, but many individuals are interested in alternatives to m-ADM. Mindfulness-based cognitive therapy (MBCT) has been shown to reduce the risk of relapse/recurrence compared with usual care but has not yet been compared with m-ADM in a definitive trial.

Author(s): 
Kuyken, Willem
Hayes, Rachel
Barrett, Barbara
Byng, Richard
Dalgleish, Tim
Kessler, David
Lewis, Glyn
Watkins, Edward
Morant, Nicola
Taylor, Rod S.
Byford, Sarah
Publication Title: 
Journal of Alternative and Complementary Medicine (New York, N.Y.)

Criteria for therapeutic efficacy and safety include significant amelioration of symptoms and, ideally, cure (i.e., patients' belief in effective improvement of symptoms and quality of life, durable impact on symptoms, verifiable subjective and objective changes); improved patient management (e.g., diminishing, or ceasing medication, physiotherapy, and other interventions); safety for patient and practitioner and an acceptable side effect profile; cost-effectiveness of the therapy in practice and to teach to others.

Author(s): 
Jobst, K. A.
Publication Title: 
Oral Diseases

OBJECTIVE: The objective is to analyse the treatment procedures used in the individual studies to identify any similarities of therapeutic approaches and subsequently present recommendations for a standard acupuncture procedure for the treatment of temporomandibular disorders (TMD). MATERIALS: Literature searches performed by the Royal Society of Medicine and the University Library, Copenhagen were able to identify 74 publications regarding the use of acupuncture in dentistry. Among them 14 papers concerned the use of acupuncture in the treatment of TMD.

Author(s): 
Rosted, P.
Publication Title: 
Complementary Therapies in Clinical Practice

BACKGROUND: The randomized controlled trial (RCT) is considered the 'gold standard' methodology for evaluating efficacy of an intervention. It has been argued that RCTs cannot be used to examine the effectiveness of acupuncture. PURPOSE: The purpose of this paper is to examine the applicability of an RCT study design for acupuncture research. FINDINGS: RCTs would be more effective in studying acupuncture if study participants were randomized to groups based on the acupuncture diagnosis and not solely on the Western diagnostic criteria.

Author(s): 
Walji, Rishma
Boon, Heather
Publication Title: 
Journal of Alternative and Complementary Medicine (New York, N.Y.)

BACKGROUND: Sustained and subtle hyperventilation can result in a wide variety of symptoms, leading to a chronic condition that has been termed hyperventilation syndrome (HVS). Treatment options include physiotherapy, in the form of breathing retraining (BR), but additional approaches aim to reduce the anxiety that is recognized as being a frequent component of this condition.

Author(s): 
Gibson, Denise
Bruton, Anne
Lewith, George T.
Mullee, Mark
Publication Title: 
Journal of Alternative and Complementary Medicine (New York, N.Y.)

INTRODUCTION: Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM), a modern interpretation of Chinese medicine, developed in the 1950s. It differentiates biomedical diseases into patterns. Each pattern comprises symptom/signs that have their own unique treatment protocol. Most TCM research has used fixed formula treatments for Western-defined diseases with outcomes often measured using objective biomedical markers. More recently, a number of trials have attempted to accommodate TCM clinical practice within the framework of rigorous evidence-based medical research.

Author(s): 
Berle, Christine A.
Cobbin, Deirdre
Smith, Narelle
Zaslawski, Christopher
Publication Title: 
Journal of Alternative and Complementary Medicine (New York, N.Y.)

INTRODUCTION: Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM), a modern interpretation of Chinese medicine, developed in the 1950s. It differentiates biomedical diseases into patterns. Each pattern comprises symptom/signs that have their own unique treatment protocol. Most TCM research has used fixed formula treatments for Western-defined diseases with outcomes often measured using objective biomedical markers. More recently, a number of trials have attempted to accommodate TCM clinical practice within the framework of rigorous evidence-based medical research.

Author(s): 
Berle, Christine A.
Cobbin, Deirdre
Smith, Narelle
Zaslawski, Christopher
Publication Title: 
BMJ clinical evidence

INTRODUCTION: More than half of pregnant women suffer from nausea and vomiting, which typically begins by the 4th week and disappears by the 16th week of pregnancy. The cause of nausea and vomiting in pregnancy is unknown, but may be due to the rise in human chorionic gonadotrophin concentration. In 1 in 200 women, the condition progresses to hyperemesis gravidarum, which is characterised by prolonged and severe nausea and vomiting, dehydration, and weight loss.

Author(s): 
Festin, Mario

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