Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorders

Publication Title: 
The Journal of the American Board of Family Practice

BACKGROUND: Although emerging evidence during the past several decades suggests that psychosocial factors can directly influence both physiologic function and health outcomes, medicine had failed to move beyond the biomedical model, in part because of lack of exposure to the evidence base supporting the biopsychosocial model. The literature was reviewed to examine the efficacy of representative psychosocial-mind-body interventions, including relaxation, (cognitive) behavioral therapies, meditation, imagery, biofeedback, and hypnosis for several common clinical conditions.

Author(s): 
Astin, John A.
Shapiro, Shauna L.
Eisenberg, David M.
Forys, Kelly L.
Publication Title: 
Clinical Journal of Oncology Nursing

Although yoga has been practiced in Eastern culture for thousands of years as part of life philosophy, classes in the United States only recently have been offered to people with cancer. The word yoga is derived from the Sanskrit root yuj, meaning to bind, join, and yoke. This reflection of the union of the body, mind, and spirit is what differentiates yoga from general exercise programs. Yoga classes in the United States generally consist of asanas (postures), which are designed to exercise every muscle, nerve, and gland in the body.

Author(s): 
DiStasio, Susan A.
Publication Title: 
Sleep Medicine Reviews

In concert with growing public interest in complementary and alternative medicine (CAM), these therapies and products have been increasingly studied over the past two decades for the treatment of sleep disorders. While systematic reviews have been conducted on acupuncture and valerian in the treatment of insomnia, to date no comprehensive review has been conducted on all major CAM treatments.

Author(s): 
Sarris, Jerome
Byrne, Gerard J.
Publication Title: 
The American Journal of Psychiatry

In 1977 the American Psychiatric Association called for a critical examination of the clinical effectiveness of meditation. The author provides a review of the literature bearing on clinical and physiological comparisons of meditation with other self-control strategies. He begins by providing a definition of mediation and then cites the literature comparing mediation with such self-regulation strategies as biofeedback, hypnosis, and progressive relaxation.

Author(s): 
Shapiro, D. H.
Publication Title: 
The Journal of the American Board of Family Practice

BACKGROUND: Although emerging evidence during the past several decades suggests that psychosocial factors can directly influence both physiologic function and health outcomes, medicine had failed to move beyond the biomedical model, in part because of lack of exposure to the evidence base supporting the biopsychosocial model. The literature was reviewed to examine the efficacy of representative psychosocial-mind-body interventions, including relaxation, (cognitive) behavioral therapies, meditation, imagery, biofeedback, and hypnosis for several common clinical conditions.

Author(s): 
Astin, John A.
Shapiro, Shauna L.
Eisenberg, David M.
Forys, Kelly L.
Publication Title: 
Journal of Psychosomatic Research

BACKGROUND: Insomnia is a widespread and debilitating condition that affects sleep quality and daily productivity. Although mindfulness meditation (MM) has been suggested as a potentially effective supplement to medical treatment for insomnia, no comprehensively quantitative research has been conducted in this field. Therefore, we performed a meta-analysis on the findings of related randomized controlled trials (RCTs) to evaluate the effects of MM on insomnia. METHODS: Related publications in PubMed, EMBASE, the Cochrane Library and PsycINFO were searched up to July 2015.

Author(s): 
Gong, Hong
Ni, Chen-Xu
Liu, Yun-Zi
Zhang, Yi
Su, Wen-Jun
Lian, Yong-Jie
Peng, Wei
Jiang, Chun-Lei
Publication Title: 
Systematic Reviews

BACKGROUND: Sleep disturbance is a common and significant health problem that has been linked to decreased quality of life. Mindfulness-based stress reduction (MBSR) can be a potentially effective intervention for insomnia. In previous systematic review examining the effects of MBSR for people with sleep disturbance, the authors highlighted the need for additional well-designed randomized controlled trials (RCTs) to assess the effects of MBSR practice. Recently, several RCTs of the effectiveness of MBSR for individuals who have difficulties in sleep have been published.

Author(s): 
Kim, Seong Min
Park, Jeong Min
Seo, Hyun-Ju
Publication Title: 
JAMA

OBJECTIVE: To provide physicians with a responsible assessment of the integration of behavioral and relaxation approaches into the treatment of chronic pain and insomnia. PARTICIPANTS: A nonfederal, nonadvocate, 12-member panel representing the fields of family medicine, social medicine, psychiatry, psychology, public health, nursing, and epidemiology.

Publication Title: 
Current Pain and Headache Reports

Fibromyalgia (FM) is a debilitating rheumatic disorder characterized mainly by the presence of continual and widespread musculoskeletal pain, in addition to other disturbing symptoms. There is inconsistent evidence about the effectiveness of the treatments developed so far, making FM a chronic disease that is difficult to treat. The aim of this literature review was to analyze the empirical studies about psychological treatment of FM that have been published over the last twenty years.

Author(s): 
Lami, María José
Martínez, María Pilar
Sánchez, Ana Isabel
Publication Title: 
The American Journal of Psychiatry

In 1977 the American Psychiatric Association called for a critical examination of the clinical effectiveness of meditation. The author provides a review of the literature bearing on clinical and physiological comparisons of meditation with other self-control strategies. He begins by providing a definition of mediation and then cites the literature comparing mediation with such self-regulation strategies as biofeedback, hypnosis, and progressive relaxation.

Author(s): 
Shapiro, D. H.

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