Smoking

Publication Title: 
The Korean Journal of Gastroenterology = Taehan Sohwagi Hakhoe Chi

BACKGROUND/AIMS: The prevalence of colonic diverticulosis in Korea is increasing in conjunction with the adoption of western dietary pattern, extension of lifespan, and advances in diagnostic modalities. The clinical characteristics of colonic diverticulosis seem to be gradually becoming similar to those of Western societies. Therefore, factors associated with the clinical characteristics of colonic diverticulosis in Korea were investigated.

Author(s): 
Kim, Sun Young
Kim, You Sun
Kim, Hyun Tae
Kwon, Sun Ok
Oh, Myoung Ki
Cha, In Hye
Ok, Kyeong Sam
Kwak, Cheol Hun
Kim, Jin Nam
Moon, Jeong Seop
Publication Title: 
The Journals of Gerontology. Series A, Biological Sciences and Medical Sciences

BACKGROUND: The compression of morbidity hypothesis predicts that, in order to achieve their extreme old age, centenarians markedly delay or even escape diseases that would otherwise be lethal at younger ages. Phenotypic studies have not adequately characterized the prevalence and timing of age-related illnesses among those who achieve exceptional old age. Thus, we conducted a retrospective cohort study of centenarians to explore the timing of such diseases among centenarians. METHODS: Health history questionnaires were completed by 424 centenarians (aged 97-119 years) or their proxies.

Author(s): 
Evert, Jessica
Lawler, Elizabeth
Bogan, Hazel
Perls, Thomas
Publication Title: 
Recenti Progressi in Medicina

Cigarette smoking has been clearly linked to the most common causes of death in the elderly and contributes to the higher death rate and disability rate associated with many chronic illnesses that are common in this age group. The combination of smoking along with other risk factors like hypertension and diabetes increase high frequency disease, and disability as well as adding to an increase in mortality rate.

Author(s): 
Cicconetti, Paolo
Tafaro, Laura
Tedeschi, Gianluca
Tombolillo, Maria Teresa
Ursino, Rita
Marigliano, Vincenzo
Publication Title: 
Archives of Gerontology and Geriatrics. Supplement

In Western countries data from clinical and epidemiological studies have induced the public health offices to promote a great deal of advertising and informative campaigning for smoking reduction. Cigarette smoking has been clearly linked to the most common causes of death in the elderly and contributes to the higher death rate and disability rate associated with many chronic illnesses that are common in this age group.

Author(s): 
Tafaro, L.
Cicconetti, P.
Tedeschi, G.
Baratta, A.
Ursino, R.
Ettorre, E.
Marigliano, V.
Publication Title: 
Experimental Gerontology

Several studies have shown that centenarians have better cardiovascular risk profiles compared to younger old people. Some reports have revealed that cardiovascular diseases (i.e. hypertension, diabetes, angina and/or myocardial infarction) are less common in centenarians respect to 70 and 80 years old persons.

Author(s): 
Galioto, Antonio
Dominguez, Ligia J.
Pineo, Antonella
Ferlisi, Anna
Putignano, Ernesto
Belvedere, Mario
Costanza, Giuseppe
Barbagallo, Mario
Publication Title: 
Fundamental & Clinical Pharmacology

Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are of primary importance as they cause damage to lipids, proteins, and DNA either endogenously by cellular mechanism, or through exogenous exposure to environmental injury factors, including oxidation insult factors, such as tobacco smoke. Currently 46.3 million adults (25.7 percent of the population) are smokers. This includes 24 million men (28.1 percent of the total) and more than 22 million women (23.5 percent). The prevalence is highest among persons 25-44 years of age. Cigarette smokers have a higher risk of developing several chronic disorders.

Author(s): 
Babizhayev, Mark A.
Yegorov, Yegor E.
Publication Title: 
Journal of the American Geriatrics Society

OBJECTIVES: To assess lifestyle factors including physical activity, smoking, alcohol consumption, and dietary habits in men and women with exceptional longevity. DESIGN: Retrospective cohort study. SETTING: A cohort of community-dwelling Ashkenazi Jewish individuals with exceptional longevity defined as survival and living independently at age 95 and older.

Author(s): 
Rajpathak, Swapnil N.
Liu, Yingheng
Ben-David, Orit
Reddy, Saritha
Atzmon, Gil
Crandall, Jill
Barzilai, Nir
Publication Title: 
Aging Cell

Short leukocyte telomere length (LTL) is associated with atherosclerosis in adults and diminished survival in the elderly. LTL dynamics are defined by LTL at birth, which is highly variable, and its age-dependent attrition thereafter, which is rapid during the first 20 years of life. We examined whether age-dependent LTL attrition during adulthood can substantially affect individuals' LTL ranking (e.g., longer or shorter LTL) in relation to their peers. We measured LTL in samples donated 12 years apart on average by 1156 participants in four longitudinal studies.

Author(s): 
Benetos, Athanase
Kark, Jeremy D.
Susser, Ezra
Kimura, Masayuki
Sinnreich, Ronit
Chen, Wei
Steenstrup, Troels
Christensen, Kaare
Herbig, Utz
von Bornemann Hjelmborg, Jacob
Srinivasan, Sathanur R.
Berenson, Gerald S.
Labat, Carlos
Aviv, Abraham
Publication Title: 
The Journals of Gerontology. Series A, Biological Sciences and Medical Sciences

BACKGROUND: Leukocyte telomere length (LTL) ostensibly shortens with age and has been moderately associated with mortality. In humans, these findings have come almost solely from cross-sectional studies. Only recently has LTL shortening within individuals been analyzed in longitudinal studies. Such studies are relevant to establish LTL dynamics as biomarkers of mortality as well as to disentangle the causality of telomeres on aging. METHODS: We present a large longitudinal study on LTL and human mortality, where the 10-year change of LTL is analyzed in 1,356 individuals aged 30-70 years.

Author(s): 
Bendix, Laila
Thinggaard, Mikael
Fenger, Mogens
Kolvraa, Steen
Avlund, Kirsten
Linneberg, Allan
Osler, Merete
Publication Title: 
AIDS patient care and STDs

The increased longevity afforded by combination antiretroviral therapy in developed countries has led to an increased concern regarding senescence-related diseases in patients with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. Previous epidemiologic analyses have demonstrated an increased risk of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, as well as a significant burden of respiratory symptoms in HIV-infected patients. We performed the St.

Author(s): 
Leung, Janice M.
Liu, Joseph C.
Mtambo, Andy
Ngan, David
Nashta, Negar
Guillemi, Silvia
Harris, Marianne
Lima, Viviane D.
Mattman, Andre
Shaipanich, Tawimas
Raju, Rekha
Hague, Cameron
Leipsic, Jonathon A.
Sin, Don D.
Montaner, Julio S.
Man, S. F. Paul

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