Smoking

Publication Title: 
BMC research notes

BACKGROUND: Exercise is one choice of additional treatment for smoking cessation by relieving nicotine withdrawal symptoms and smoking craving. The possible mechanism of the effect of exercise on relieving nicotine withdrawal symptoms and smoking craving is including affect, biological, and cognitive hypotheses. Evidence suggests that different types of exercise have different effects on these mechanisms. Therefore, type of exercise might have effect on smoking cessation.

Author(s): 
Klinsophon, Thaniya
Thaveeratitham, Premtip
Sitthipornvorakul, Ekalak
Janwantanakul, Prawit
Publication Title: 
Psychopharmacology

RATIONALE: Smoking cessation is associated with cigarette cravings and tobacco withdrawal symptoms (TWS), and exercise appears to ameliorate many of these negative effects. A number of studies have examined the relationships between exercise, cigarette cravings, and TWS. OBJECTIVES: The objectives of this study were (a) to review and update the literature examining the effects of short bouts of exercise on cigarette cravings, TWS, affect, and smoking behaviour and (b) to conduct meta-analyses of the effect of exercise on cigarette cravings.

Author(s): 
Roberts, Vaughan
Maddison, Ralph
Simpson, Caroline
Bullen, Chris
Prapavessis, Harry
Publication Title: 
Drug and Alcohol Dependence

OBJECTIVE: The limited success of current smoking cessation therapies encourages research into new treatment strategies. Mind-body practices such as yoga and meditation have the potential to aid smoking cessation and become an alternative drug-free treatment option. The aim of this article is to assess the efficacy of yoga and other meditation-based interventions for smoking cessation, to identify the challenges of clinical trials applying mind-body treatments, and to outline directions for future research on these types of therapies to assist in smoking cessation.

Author(s): 
Carim-Todd, Laura
Mitchell, Suzanne H.
Oken, Barry S.
Publication Title: 
Journal of Evidence-Based Complementary & Alternative Medicine

The current study provided a review of evidence-based yoga interventions' impact on smoking cessation. The researchers reviewed articles obtained from MEDLINE (PubMed), EBSCOHOST, PROQUEST, MEDINDIA, CINAHL, Alt HealthWatch, and AMED databases. Inclusion criteria were as follows: (a) study published between 2004 and 2013, (b) study published in English language, (c) study used yoga-based interventions, (d) study involved smokers with varying level of smoking, (e) study used any quantitative design, and (f) study had physiological and/or psychological outcomes.

Author(s): 
Dai, Chia-Liang
Sharma, Manoj
Publication Title: 
Drug and Alcohol Dependence

OBJECTIVE: The limited success of current smoking cessation therapies encourages research into new treatment strategies. Mind-body practices such as yoga and meditation have the potential to aid smoking cessation and become an alternative drug-free treatment option. The aim of this article is to assess the efficacy of yoga and other meditation-based interventions for smoking cessation, to identify the challenges of clinical trials applying mind-body treatments, and to outline directions for future research on these types of therapies to assist in smoking cessation.

Author(s): 
Carim-Todd, Laura
Mitchell, Suzanne H.
Oken, Barry S.
Publication Title: 
Journal of Alternative and Complementary Medicine (New York, N.Y.)

OBJECTIVES: Smoking is a chronic process in which craving and negative affect are considered the main barriers to maintaining abstinence in patients who have gone through treatment. Mindfulness-based interventions have presented encouraging preliminary results in follow-up lasting up to 6 months. The aim of this study was to perform a systematic literature review on the effects of mindfulness-based interventions for the treatment of smoking. METHODS: Of 198 articles on mindfulness and smoking, 13 controlled empirical studies were selected for the analysis.

Author(s): 
de Souza, Isabel Cristina Weiss
de Barros, Viviam Vargas
Gomide, Henrique Pinto
Miranda, Tassiana Cristina Mendes
Menezes, Vinícius de Paula
Kozasa, Elisa Harumi
Noto, Ana Regina
Publication Title: 
Current Cardiology Reports

The purpose of this review is to provide (1) a synopsis on relations of mindfulness with cardiovascular disease (CVD) and major CVD risk factors, and (2) an initial consensus-based overview of mechanisms and theoretical framework by which mindfulness might influence CVD. Initial evidence, often of limited methodological quality, suggests possible impacts of mindfulness on CVD risk factors including physical activity, smoking, diet, obesity, blood pressure, and diabetes regulation.

Author(s): 
Loucks, Eric B.
Schuman-Olivier, Zev
Britton, Willoughby B.
Fresco, David M.
Desbordes, Gaelle
Brewer, Judson A.
Fulwiler, Carl
Publication Title: 
Archives of Internal Medicine

In a systematic review of the efficacy of interventions intended to help people stop smoking, data have been analyzed from 188 randomized controlled trials. Following personal advice and encouragement to stop smoking given by physicians during a single routine consultation, an estimated 2% (95% confidence limits, 1%, 3%; P < .001) of all smokers stopped smoking and did not relapse up to 1 year as a direct consequence of the advice. The effect is modest but cost-effective: the cost of saving a life is about $1500.

Author(s): 
Law, M.
Tang, J. L.
Publication Title: 
Gaceta Medica De Mexico

BACKGROUND: smoking is a chronic disease in the group of addictions and its treatment includes two components:psychosocial and pharmacological intervention. Other types of therapeutic approaches have been used as treatment options for tobacco addiction. Acupuncture, hypnosis and homeopathy are the most used nonconventional interventions. OBJECTIVE: review the available evidence in regards to the use of alternative therapies for smoking cessation in the adult population from the published clinical practice guidelines (CPG).

Author(s): 
Astrid Becerra, Nelci
Alba, Luz Helena
Castillo, Juan Sebastián
Murillo, Raúl
Cañas, Alejandra
García-Herreros, Plutarco
Publication Title: 
The International Journal of Clinical and Experimental Hypnosis

Results of a meta-analysis showed that males were more likely to report smoking abstinence than female participants following hypnosis-based treatments for smoking. Across 12 studies that used hypnosis in the treatment of smoking and reported outcome statistics by gender, the authors found that the odds of achieving smoking abstinence were 1.37 times greater for male than female participants. The results are consistent with the nonhypnosis literature suggesting that females have a more difficult time achieving smoking abstinence compared to males.

Author(s): 
Green, Joseph P.
Jay Lynn, Steven
Montgomery, Guy H.

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