Smoking Cessation

Publication Title: 
BMC research notes

BACKGROUND: Exercise is one choice of additional treatment for smoking cessation by relieving nicotine withdrawal symptoms and smoking craving. The possible mechanism of the effect of exercise on relieving nicotine withdrawal symptoms and smoking craving is including affect, biological, and cognitive hypotheses. Evidence suggests that different types of exercise have different effects on these mechanisms. Therefore, type of exercise might have effect on smoking cessation.

Author(s): 
Klinsophon, Thaniya
Thaveeratitham, Premtip
Sitthipornvorakul, Ekalak
Janwantanakul, Prawit
Publication Title: 
Psychopharmacology

RATIONALE: Smoking cessation is associated with cigarette cravings and tobacco withdrawal symptoms (TWS), and exercise appears to ameliorate many of these negative effects. A number of studies have examined the relationships between exercise, cigarette cravings, and TWS. OBJECTIVES: The objectives of this study were (a) to review and update the literature examining the effects of short bouts of exercise on cigarette cravings, TWS, affect, and smoking behaviour and (b) to conduct meta-analyses of the effect of exercise on cigarette cravings.

Author(s): 
Roberts, Vaughan
Maddison, Ralph
Simpson, Caroline
Bullen, Chris
Prapavessis, Harry
Publication Title: 
Drug and Alcohol Dependence

OBJECTIVE: The limited success of current smoking cessation therapies encourages research into new treatment strategies. Mind-body practices such as yoga and meditation have the potential to aid smoking cessation and become an alternative drug-free treatment option. The aim of this article is to assess the efficacy of yoga and other meditation-based interventions for smoking cessation, to identify the challenges of clinical trials applying mind-body treatments, and to outline directions for future research on these types of therapies to assist in smoking cessation.

Author(s): 
Carim-Todd, Laura
Mitchell, Suzanne H.
Oken, Barry S.
Publication Title: 
Journal of Evidence-Based Complementary & Alternative Medicine

The current study provided a review of evidence-based yoga interventions' impact on smoking cessation. The researchers reviewed articles obtained from MEDLINE (PubMed), EBSCOHOST, PROQUEST, MEDINDIA, CINAHL, Alt HealthWatch, and AMED databases. Inclusion criteria were as follows: (a) study published between 2004 and 2013, (b) study published in English language, (c) study used yoga-based interventions, (d) study involved smokers with varying level of smoking, (e) study used any quantitative design, and (f) study had physiological and/or psychological outcomes.

Author(s): 
Dai, Chia-Liang
Sharma, Manoj
Publication Title: 
Expert Review of Respiratory Medicine

INTRODUCTION: Tobacco remains the key modifiable risk factor for the development of a number of diseases, including cardiovascular disease, cerebrovascular disease, lower respiratory infections, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, tuberculosis and cancer. Among priority populations, smoking prevalence remains high, smokers tend to relapse more often and earlier and fewer are able to sustain quit attempts. This systematic review provides an update on the literature.

Author(s): 
Wilson, Amanda
Guillaumier, Ashleigh
George, Johnson
Denham, Alexandra
Bonevski, Billie
Publication Title: 
The Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews

BACKGROUND: There are high expectations regarding the potential for the communication of DNA-based disease risk estimates to motivate behaviour change. OBJECTIVES: To assess the effects of communicating DNA-based disease risk estimates on risk-reducing behaviours and motivation to undertake such behaviours.

Author(s): 
Marteau, Theresa M.
French, David P.
Griffin, Simon J.
Prevost, A. T.
Sutton, Stephen
Watkinson, Clare
Attwood, Sophie
Hollands, Gareth J.
Publication Title: 
Drug and Alcohol Dependence

OBJECTIVE: The limited success of current smoking cessation therapies encourages research into new treatment strategies. Mind-body practices such as yoga and meditation have the potential to aid smoking cessation and become an alternative drug-free treatment option. The aim of this article is to assess the efficacy of yoga and other meditation-based interventions for smoking cessation, to identify the challenges of clinical trials applying mind-body treatments, and to outline directions for future research on these types of therapies to assist in smoking cessation.

Author(s): 
Carim-Todd, Laura
Mitchell, Suzanne H.
Oken, Barry S.
Publication Title: 
Addictive Behaviors

BACKGROUND: Smokers increasingly seek alternative interventions to assist in cessation or reduction efforts. Mindfulness meditation, which facilitates detached observation and paying attention to the present moment with openness, curiosity, and acceptance, has recently been studied as a smoking cessation intervention. AIMS: This review synthesizes randomized controlled trials (RCTs) of mindfulness meditation (MM) interventions for smoking cessation.

Author(s): 
Maglione, Margaret A.
Maher, Alicia Ruelaz
Ewing, Brett
Colaiaco, Benjamin
Newberry, Sydne
Kandrack, Ryan
Shanman, Roberta M.
Sorbero, Melony E.
Hempel, Susanne
Publication Title: 
Drug and Alcohol Dependence

BACKGROUND: In the past decade, multiple studies have examined the effectiveness of Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT) for substance use disorders relative to other active treatments. The current meta-analysis examined the aggregate effect size when comparing ACT to other treatments (e.g., CBT, pharmacotherapy, 12-step, treatment as usual) specifically on substance use outcomes. METHOD: A total of 10 randomized controlled trials were identified through systematic searches.

Author(s): 
Lee, Eric B.
An, Woolee
Levin, Michael E.
Twohig, Michael P.
Publication Title: 
Journal of Health Psychology

Recent studies have shown that mindfulness training has a promising potential for smoking treatment. In order to examine the efficacy of mindfulness training in smoking cessation, we performed a systematic review of the literature and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials. Four randomized controlled trials with 474 patients were included in our analysis.

Author(s): 
Oikonomou, Maria Theodora
Arvanitis, Marios
Sokolove, Robert L.

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