Social Desirability

Publication Title: 
Christian Bioethics

Discussions of genetic enhancements often imply deep suspicions about human desires to manipulate or enhance the course of our future. These unspoken assumptions about the arrogance of the quest for perfection are at odds with the normally hopeful resonancy we find in contemporary theology. The author argues that these fears, suspicions and accusations are misplaced. The problem lies not with the question of whether we should pursue perfection, but rather what perfection we are pursuing.

Author(s): 
Keenan, James F.
Publication Title: 
The Spanish Journal of Psychology

Comparative optimism can be defined as a self-serving, asymmetric judgment of the future. It is often thought to be beneficial and socially accepted, whereas comparative pessimism is correlated with depression and socially rejected. Our goal was to examine the social acceptance of comparative optimism and the social rejection of comparative pessimism in two dimensions of social judgment, social desirability and social utility, considering the attributions of dysphoria and risk-taking potential (studies 2 and 3) on outlooks on the future.

Author(s): 
Milhabet, Isabelle
Le Barbenchon, Emmanuelle
Cambon, Laurent
Molina, Guylaine
Publication Title: 
Journal of Personality Assessment

Forty-three medical students and 78 nursing students each filled out four copies of the Interpersonal Check List. The subjects described self, ideal self as physician or nurse, and typical and ideal work partner. For each questionnaire the two summary scores Dom and Lov were computed. The results indicate a discrepancy between concepts of self and ideal self and the results also point to considerable disagreement between medical students and nursing students about their roles on the physician-nurse team.

Author(s): 
Rein, I.
Publication Title: 
Archives of Sexual Behavior

Young adult male homosexuals were recruited from a homosexual group and were given the Roe-Siegelman Parent-Child Relations questionnaire and the Marlowe-Crowne social desirability scale. Compared to a control group of heterosexuals, the homosexual group rated their mothers significantly more rejecting and their fathers less loving and more rejecting. The Love-Reject factor also showed the between-groups difference for the ratings of fathers; for mothers, the Love-Reject factor difference was marginally significant.

Author(s): 
Milic, J. H.
Crowne, D. P.
Publication Title: 
Archives of Sexual Behavior

The moderator effect of gender on (i) the relation between adolescents' sexual experience on the one hand; and (ii) their orientations towards the type of relational and emotional commitment that they expect to be present before engaging in a sexual relationship, and (iii) having a steady partner on the other was examined. We hypothesized that the relations between these facets would be stronger for women. We utilized a random sample of 253 British adolescents interviewed twice with a 1-year interval.

Author(s): 
Taris, T. W.
Semin, G. R.
Publication Title: 
The Journal of Psychology

In 2 experiments, the researcher investigated the social desirability of different love styles (Eros, Ludus, Storge, Pragma, Mania, and Agape). In Experiment 1, the Marlowe-Crowne measure of social desirability (D. P. Crowne & D. Marlowe, 1960) was correlated negatively with possessive, dependent (Mania) love styles in both men and women. In men, social desirability was correlated positively with romantic, passionate love (Eros) and game-playing love (Ludus), but negatively with all-giving, selfless love (Agape).

Author(s): 
Davies, M. F.
Publication Title: 
Journal of Sex Research

This study examined the relationship of type of sexually instigating situation (partner behavior conveying emotional investment or not), relationship stage, and gender to self-reported likelihood of engaging in sexual behavior. Participants (200 female and 122 male college students) read scenarios describing partner behavior in eight hypothetical sexual situations. Five of the sexual situations were proposed to explicitly communicate a sense of emotional investment in the relationship, and three other scenarios were conceived as not explicitly conveying emotional investment.

Author(s): 
Hill, Craig A.
Publication Title: 
Personality & Social Psychology Bulletin

Although a number of studies have explored the ways that men and women romantically attract mates, almost no research exists on the special tactics people use when already in a relationship and trying to attract someone new--a process known as mate poaching enticement. In Study 1, the authors investigated the tactics people use to entice others into making mate poaching attempts. Enticement tactic effectiveness conformed to evolutionary-predicted patterns across sex and temporal context. In Study 2, the authors examined the tactics men and women use to disguise mate poaching enticement.

Author(s): 
Schmitt, David P.
Shackelford, Todd K.
Publication Title: 
Psychological Reports

College students from Brigham Young University (N= 186; 68 men, 118 women, M age=22.7 yr., SD=3.5) completed a survey regarding nonsexual, romantic physical affection-defined as any touch intended to arouse feelings of love in the giver or the recipient. Respondents included both dating and married individuals, although this was not specified on the questionnaire.

Author(s): 
Gulledge, Andrew K.
Stahmann, Robert F.
Wilson, Colwick M.
Publication Title: 
Psychological Science

Gaze direction is a vital communicative channel through which people transmit information to each other. By signaling the locus of social attention, gaze cues convey information about the relative importance of objects, including other people, in the environment. For the most part, this information is communicated via patterns of gaze direction, with gaze shifts signaling changes in the objects of attention. Noting the relevance of gaze cues in social cognition, we speculated that gaze shifts may modulate people's evaluations of others.

Author(s): 
Mason, Malia F.
Tatkow, Elizabeth P.
Macrae, C. Neil

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