Sociology, Medical

Publication Title: 
Sociology of Health & Illness

Acupuncture and other types of 'complementary and alternative medicine' (CAM) are proving increasingly popular in the UK. As attempts to incorporate acupuncture into allopathic medicine have grown in number, the issue of assessing its effectiveness in ways consistent with the concept of evidence-based medicine has become more urgent. The nature, relevance and applicability of such assessments remain controversial however.

Author(s): 
Jackson, Sue
Scambler, Graham
Publication Title: 
Medical Anthropology Quarterly

The Roman Catholic Church is the single largest denomination in the United States and the one with the most extensive provider stake in health (and related social service) care. As a follow-up to an earlier analysis of the Catholic role in the thwarted health care reform effort of 1993-94, this article looks at the revival of interest in reform and at the rationale behind and strategy of the Catholic Church's current agenda-setting initiative.

Author(s): 
Angrosino, M. V.
Publication Title: 
Nursing Science Quarterly

This column seeks to contribute to the understanding of the concept of sacrifice and its significance to nursing through an extensive account of relevant literature from the disciplines of theology, sociology, anthropology, and psychology. The review uncovered that in sacrificing something of value, individuals anticipate connecting with families, groups, society, and deities.

Author(s): 
Florczak, Kristine L.
Publication Title: 
Sociology of Health & Illness

Recent research has highlighted how parental narratives can be important in the resistance against disabling processes. This article contains analyses of enabling language in narratives published by Scandinavian disability rights organizations. First, drawing on the work of Fisher and Goodley, I point out that the material constitute a threefold: normality narratives, resistance narratives, and narratives that demonstrate an appreciation of the present and the child's individual alterity.

Author(s): 
Hanisch, Halvor
Publication Title: 
Social Science & Medicine (1982)

Informal payments are known to be widespread in the post-communist health care systems of Central and Eastern Europe. However, their role and nature remains contentious with the debate characterized by much polemic. This paper aims to make sense of this debate by reviewing and summarizing the main arguments of the theoretical debate in Hungary. The review examines the possible causes of informal payment, the motivation of the actors involved and the impact of informal payment on system performance, focusing on efficiency and equity.

Author(s): 
Gaal, Peter
McKee, Martin
Publication Title: 
Transfusion Science

Paid blood donation still has its defenders, who cite economic doctrines denying the existence of altruism per se, the inability of most countries with exclusively voluntary donations to achieve self-sufficiency and the supposedly successful use of selected groups of paid donors. This paper argues that blood donation is an example of genuine altruism where the altruistic behaviour is incorporated into the self as a role. Unpaid donation is proven to be much safer for receivers and supply problems can be attributed fundamentally to inefficiencies in the organization of transfusion services.

Author(s): 
Fern·ndez-Montoya, A.
Publication Title: 
The Milbank Quarterly

The political legitimacy and policymaking influence of the medical profession have greatly declined in American society over the past 30 years. Despite speculation about the causes, there has been little empirical research assessing the different explanations. To address this gap, data collected in 1995 are used to compare attitudes of the American public and policy elites toward medical authority.

Author(s): 
Schlesinger, Mark
Publication Title: 
The Mount Sinai Journal of Medicine, New York

Three different sources of data are used to explore how medical students think about the physician as a professional.

Author(s): 
Hafferty, Frederic W.
Publication Title: 
Clinical Medicine (London, England)

Medical professionalism is deeply embedded in medical practice in the UK but, with changes in the modern healthcare climate, its nature and role have been increasingly challenged. The Royal College of Physicians (RCP) therefore convened a working party to consider the concept of medical professionalism, to clarify its value and purpose, and to define it. As part of this project, the RCP Trainees Committee was commissioned to survey trainees to obtain their views on the matter.

Author(s): 
Chard, Declan
Elsharkawy, Ahmed
Newbery, Nina
Publication Title: 
Journal of Health and Social Behavior

A pressing concern in contemporary health policy is whether the medical profession's mandate to take care of clients has been undermined by the influx of money into health care. We examine the medical profession's transformation over the past decades. First, we review how sociologists have viewed the medical profession over the past half-century as one stakeholder among other stakeholders vying for market share and power in the health care field.

Author(s): 
Timmermans, Stefan
Oh, Hyeyoung

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