Spectrometry, X-Ray Emission

Publication Title: 
JAMA

CONTEXT: Lead, mercury, and arsenic intoxication have been associated with the use of Ayurvedic herbal medicine product (HMPs). OBJECTIVES: To determine the prevalence and concentration of heavy metals in Ayurvedic HMPs manufactured in South Asia and sold in Boston-area stores and to compare estimated daily metal ingestion with regulatory standards.

Author(s): 
Saper, Robert B.
Kales, Stefanos N.
Paquin, Janet
Burns, Michael J.
Eisenberg, David M.
Davis, Roger B.
Phillips, Russell S.
Publication Title: 
Spectrochimica Acta. Part A, Molecular and Biomolecular Spectroscopy

A green one step facile synthesis of graphene nanosheets by Terminalia chebula (T. chebula) extract mediated reduction of graphite oxide (GO) is reported in this work. This method avoids the use of harmful toxic reducing agents. The comparative results of various characterizations of GO and T. chebula reduced graphene oxide (TCG) provide a strong indication of the exclusion of oxygen containing groups from graphene oxide and successive stabilization of the formed reduced graphene oxide (RGO).

Author(s): 
Maddinedi, Sireesh Babu
Mandal, Badal Kumar
Vankayala, Raviraj
Kalluru, Poliraju
Pamanji, Sreedhara Reddy
Publication Title: 
The Science of the Total Environment

Arsenic and lead have been found in a number of traditional Ayurvedic medicines, and the practice of Rasa Shastra (combining herbs with metals, minerals and gems), or plant ingredients that contain these elements, may be possible sources. To obtain an estimate of arsenic and lead solubility in the human gastrointestinal tract, bioaccessibility of the two elements was measured in 42 medicines, using a physiologically-based extraction test.

Author(s): 
Koch, Iris
Moriarty, Maeve
House, Kim
Sui, Jie
Cullen, William R.
Saper, Robert B.
Reimer, Kenneth J.
Publication Title: 
JAMA

CONTEXT: Lead, mercury, and arsenic intoxication have been associated with the use of Ayurvedic herbal medicine product (HMPs). OBJECTIVES: To determine the prevalence and concentration of heavy metals in Ayurvedic HMPs manufactured in South Asia and sold in Boston-area stores and to compare estimated daily metal ingestion with regulatory standards.

Author(s): 
Saper, Robert B.
Kales, Stefanos N.
Paquin, Janet
Burns, Michael J.
Eisenberg, David M.
Davis, Roger B.
Phillips, Russell S.
Publication Title: 
Journal of Occupational and Environmental Hygiene

Blood lead surveys in several areas of India have found very high percentages of children with elevated blood lead levels. Fifty-three percent of children under 12 years of age in a seven-city screening had blood lead levels equal to or greater than 10 microg/dL, the level currently considered elevated by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). A number of these surveys focused on populations near lead smelters or in areas with high lead levels from combustion of lead-containing gasoline.

Author(s): 
Clark, C. S.
Thuppil, V.
Clark, R.
Sinha, S.
Menezes, G.
D'Souza, H.
Nayak, N.
Kuruvilla, A.
Law, T.
Dave, P.
Shah, S.
Publication Title: 
The Science of the Total Environment

Arsenic and lead have been found in a number of traditional Ayurvedic medicines, and the practice of Rasa Shastra (combining herbs with metals, minerals and gems), or plant ingredients that contain these elements, may be possible sources. To obtain an estimate of arsenic and lead solubility in the human gastrointestinal tract, bioaccessibility of the two elements was measured in 42 medicines, using a physiologically-based extraction test.

Author(s): 
Koch, Iris
Moriarty, Maeve
House, Kim
Sui, Jie
Cullen, William R.
Saper, Robert B.
Reimer, Kenneth J.
Publication Title: 
The Science of the Total Environment

Five Ayurvedic medicines with mercury concentrations of 85mg/kg and higher were characterized with respect to their speciation and their bioaccessibility. X-ray absorption spectroscopy revealed that the mercury in the Ayurvedic medicines was inorganic and best matched to cinnabar, even in samples that had been hypothesized to contain mercury through plant sources only.

Author(s): 
Koch, Iris
Moriarty, Maeve
Sui, Jie
Rutter, Allison
Saper, Robert B.
Reimer, Kenneth J.
Publication Title: 
The Science of the Total Environment

Arsenic and lead have been found in a number of traditional Ayurvedic medicines, and the practice of Rasa Shastra (combining herbs with metals, minerals and gems), or plant ingredients that contain these elements, may be possible sources. To obtain an estimate of arsenic and lead solubility in the human gastrointestinal tract, bioaccessibility of the two elements was measured in 42 medicines, using a physiologically-based extraction test.

Author(s): 
Koch, Iris
Moriarty, Maeve
House, Kim
Sui, Jie
Cullen, William R.
Saper, Robert B.
Reimer, Kenneth J.
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