Spices

Publication Title: 
Journal of Ethnopharmacology

ETHNOPHARMACOLOGICAL RELEVANCE: Tropical spices have long been utilized in traditional medicine and cuisine. New archaeological evidence highlights temporal changes in the nature and scale of the ancient spice trade and in the ancient usage of these plants. Furthermore, a study of their 'materiality' highlights that the impact of spices extends beyond their material properties. Here the botanical remains of spices recovered from archaeological excavations at a port active in the Roman and medieval Islamic spice trade are evaluated.

Author(s): 
Van der Veen, Marijke
Morales, Jacob
Publication Title: 
Prague Medical Report

The typical spices used in winter include nutmeg, cinnamon, clove and anise. These spices contain two groups of chemicals, the allylbenzenes and their isomers, the propenylbenzenes. It was suggested 40 years ago by Alexander Shulgin that these substances act as metabolic precursors of amphetamines. The biotransformation of these precursors to nitrogen-containing metabolites is reviewed. These reactions have not been reported in humans.

Author(s): 
Idle, J. R.
Publication Title: 
Journal of Alternative and Complementary Medicine (New York, N.Y.)

Ayurveda is a natural health care system that originated in India more than 5000 years ago. Its main objective is to achieve optimal health and well-being through a comprehensive approach that addresses mind, body, behavior, and environment. Ayurveda emphasizes prevention and health promotion, and provides treatment for disease. It considers the development of consciousness to be essential for optimal health and meditation as the main technique for achieving this. Treatment of disease is highly individualized and depends on the psychophysiologic constitution of the patient.

Author(s): 
Sharma, Hari
Chandola, H. M.
Singh, Gurdip
Basisht, Gopal
Publication Title: 
Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology

Turmeric, derived from the plant Curcuma longa, is a gold-colored spice commonly used in the Indian subcontinent, not only for health care but also for the preservation of food and as a yellow dye for textiles. Curcumin, which gives the yellow color to turmeric, was first isolated almost two centuries ago, and its structure as diferuloylmethane was determined in 1910.

Author(s): 
Aggarwal, Bharat B.
Sundaram, Chitra
Malani, Nikita
Ichikawa, Haruyo
Publication Title: 
Molecular Nutrition & Food Research

Although much has been published about curcumin, which is obtained from turmeric, comparatively little is known about turmeric itself. Turmeric, a golden spice obtained from the rhizome of the plant Curcuma longa, has been used to give color and taste to food preparations since ancient times. Traditionally, this spice has been used in Ayurveda and folk medicine for the treatment of such ailments as gynecological problems, gastric problems, hepatic disorders, infectious diseases, and blood disorders.

Author(s): 
Gupta, Subash C.
Sung, Bokyung
Kim, Ji Hye
Prasad, Sahdeo
Li, Shiyou
Aggarwal, Bharat B.
Publication Title: 
Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology

Turmeric, derived from the plant Curcuma longa, is a gold-colored spice commonly used in the Indian subcontinent, not only for health care but also for the preservation of food and as a yellow dye for textiles. Curcumin, which gives the yellow color to turmeric, was first isolated almost two centuries ago, and its structure as diferuloylmethane was determined in 1910.

Author(s): 
Aggarwal, Bharat B.
Sundaram, Chitra
Malani, Nikita
Ichikawa, Haruyo
Publication Title: 
Biochemical Pharmacology

Although turmeric (Curcuma longa; an Indian spice) has been described in Ayurveda, as a treatment for inflammatory diseases and is referred by different names in different cultures, the active principle called curcumin or diferuloylmethane, a yellow pigment present in turmeric (curry powder) has been shown to exhibit numerous activities. Extensive research over the last half century has revealed several important functions of curcumin. It binds to a variety of proteins and inhibits the activity of various kinases.

Author(s): 
Goel, Ajay
Kunnumakkara, Ajaikumar B.
Aggarwal, Bharat B.
Publication Title: 
Journal of Alternative and Complementary Medicine (New York, N.Y.)

Ayurveda is a natural health care system that originated in India more than 5000 years ago. Its main objective is to achieve optimal health and well-being through a comprehensive approach that addresses mind, body, behavior, and environment. Ayurveda emphasizes prevention and health promotion, and provides treatment for disease. It considers the development of consciousness to be essential for optimal health and meditation as the main technique for achieving this. Treatment of disease is highly individualized and depends on the psychophysiologic constitution of the patient.

Author(s): 
Sharma, Hari
Chandola, H. M.
Singh, Gurdip
Basisht, Gopal
Publication Title: 
Pharmaceutical Biology

CONTEXT: Development of resistance in human pathogens against conventional antibiotic necessitates searching indigenous medicinal plants having antibacterial property. Twenty-seven medicinal plants used actively in folklore, ayurvedic and traditional system of medicine were selected for the evaluation of their antimicrobial activity for this study. Eleven plants chosen from these 27 are used as spices in local cuisine. OBJECTIVE: Evaluation of the effectiveness of some medicinal plant extracts against clinical isolates.

Author(s): 
Ali, Nafisa Hassan
Faizi, Shaheen
Kazmi, Shahana Urooj
Publication Title: 
Critical Reviews in Food Science and Nutrition

The rhizomes of Zingiber officinale Roscoe (Zingiberaceae), commonly known as ginger, is one of the most widely used spice and condiment.

Author(s): 
Baliga, Manjeshwar Shrinath
Haniadka, Raghavendra
Pereira, Manisha Maria
D'Souza, Jason Jerome
Pallaty, Princy Louis
Bhat, Harshith P.
Popuri, Sandhya

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