Spinal Cord Injuries

Publication Title: 
The Journal of Spinal Cord Medicine

BACKGROUND/OBJECTIVE: To determine the degree and duration of pain relief provided by specific pain treatments used by individuals with spinal cord injury (SCI) who have chronic pain. DESIGN: Postal survey. SETTING: Community. PARTICIPANTS: Participants were 117 individuals who had traumatic SCI, were 18 years of age or older, and reported a chronic pain problem. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Questions assessing current or past use of 26 different pain treatments, the amount of relief each treatment provided, and the length of time that any pain relief usually lasts.

Author(s): 
Cardenas, Diana D.
Jensen, Mark P.
Publication Title: 
The Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews

BACKGROUND: Chronic pain is frequent in persons living with spinal cord injury (SCI). Conventionally, the pain is treated pharmacologically, yet long-term pain medication is often refractory and associated with side effects. Non-pharmacological interventions are frequently advocated, although the benefit and harm profiles of these treatments are not well established, in part because of methodological weaknesses of available studies.

Author(s): 
Boldt, Inga
Eriks-Hoogland, Inge
Brinkhof, Martin W. G.
de Bie, Rob
Joggi, Daniel
von Elm, Erik
Publication Title: 
Acta Neurochirurgica. Supplement

This paper provides an overview on various alternative, complementary, or energy-based therapies that expand the healing spectrum of individuals with spinal cord injury (SCI). Not only do they have the capability to help a variety of secondary conditions, they have the ability in some people, for certain injuries, to restore function, sometimes dramatically.

Author(s): 
Johnston, L.
Paralyzed Veterans of America's Education Foundation
Publication Title: 
Complementary Therapies in Medicine

CONTEXT: Many Japanese cases of adverse events after acupuncture are not listed in medical databases such as Medline. Therefore, they are not easily accessible to researchers outside Japan. OBJECTIVE: To complement existing reviews of adverse events after acupuncture in the West and to provide more detailed discussion and analysis. DATA SOURCES: Literature search using 'Igaku Chuo Zasshi (Japana Centra Revuo Medicina) CD-ROM version' covering the period of 1987-1999.

Author(s): 
Yamashita, H.
Tsukayama, H.
White, A. R.
Tanno, Y.
Sugishita, C.
Ernst, E.
Publication Title: 
The Journal of Spinal Cord Medicine

BACKGROUND: The National Institutes of Health has concluded that the potential value of acupuncture justifies expanding its use into conventional medicine and studying it further. METHODS: Literature review of acupuncture as it pertains to spinal cord medicine. RESULTS: Acupuncture has been used to treat a number of spinal cord injury (SCI)-related conditions, including motor deficits, pain, spasticity, and syringomyelia. CONCLUSION: Acupuncture shows promise as an intervention in the treatment of SCI-related conditions.

Author(s): 
Paola, Frederick Adolf
Arnold, Michael
Publication Title: 
The Journal of Spinal Cord Medicine

BACKGROUND/OBJECTIVE: Below-level central neuropathic pain, a diffuse pain characterized by generalized burning, is commonly experienced by individuals with spinal cord injury (SCI). The objective of this study was to investigate the effects of an electroacupuncture protocol for the treatment of below-level central neuropathic pain developed at the Toronto Rehabilitation Institute, Lyndhurst Center, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. METHOD: Retrospective chart review. RESULTS: Thirty-six individuals with traumatic and nontraumatic SCI met the inclusion criteria.

Author(s): 
Rapson, Linda M.
Wells, Nancy
Pepper, Jennifer
Majid, Nadine
Boon, Heather
Publication Title: 
Complementary Therapies in Medicine

OBJECTIVE: To assess the non-pharmacological treatments used and preferred by patients with spinal cord injury and pain. DESIGN: A cross-sectional descriptive study. INTERVENTIONS: One hundred and twenty three patients with spinal cord injury, matched for gender, age, level of lesion and completeness of injury were assessed in 1999 at the Spinalis SCI unit, Stockholm, Sweden and followed-up in a mailed survey 3 years later. In total, 82.1% of the questionnaires (n=101) were returned. Ninety of these patients still suffered pain and were thus included in the study.

Author(s): 
Norrbrink Budh, Cecilia
Lundeberg, Thomas
Publication Title: 
The Journal of Spinal Cord Medicine

BACKGROUND/OBJECTIVE: To determine the degree and duration of pain relief provided by specific pain treatments used by individuals with spinal cord injury (SCI) who have chronic pain. DESIGN: Postal survey. SETTING: Community. PARTICIPANTS: Participants were 117 individuals who had traumatic SCI, were 18 years of age or older, and reported a chronic pain problem. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Questions assessing current or past use of 26 different pain treatments, the amount of relief each treatment provided, and the length of time that any pain relief usually lasts.

Author(s): 
Cardenas, Diana D.
Jensen, Mark P.
Publication Title: 
Spinal Cord

STUDY DESIGN: Systematic review. OBJECTIVES: To provide a quantitative analysis of all randomized controlled trials designed to determine the effectiveness of physical interventions for people with spinal cord injury (SCI). SETTING: Sydney, Australia. METHODS: A search was conducted for randomized controlled trials involving physical interventions for people with SCI. Two reviewers independently rated methodological quality using the PEDro scale and extracted key findings from the trials.

Author(s): 
Harvey, L. A.
Lin, C.-Wc
Glinsky, J. V.
De Wolf, A.
Publication Title: 
Annals of Physical and Rehabilitation Medicine

OBJECTIVE: Evaluate the place and level of proof of physical therapeutics for treating neuropathic pain in spinal cord injury (SCI) patients. METHOD: Literature review from three databases: PubMed, Embase, Pascal. The following keywords were selected: chronic neuropathic pain/non-pharmacological treatment; transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation, physiotherapy, acupuncture, physical therapy, transcranial magnetic stimulation, heat therapy, ice therapy, cold therapy, massage, ultrasound, alternative treatment, complementary treatment, occupational therapy.

Author(s): 
Fattal, C.
Kong-A-Siou, D.
Gilbert, C.
Ventura, M.
Albert, T.

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