Spine

Publication Title: 
Journal of Alternative and Complementary Medicine (New York, N.Y.)

BACKGROUND: Sixty percent (60%) to 80% of patients who visit chiropractic, osteopathic, or Chinese medicine practitioners are seeking pain relief. OBJECTIVES: This article aimed to identify the amount, quality, and type of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) pain research in Australia by systematically and critically reviewing the literature. METHODS: PubMed, Scopus, Australasian Medical Index, and Cochrane library were searched from their inception to July 2009.

Author(s): 
Zheng, Zhen
Xue, Charlie C. L.
Publication Title: 
Social Science & Medicine (1982)

The basic premise of the paper is that Western medicine's co-opting of specific technologies and materials from other (indigenous) medical traditions, stripped of the original theories underlying their use, has problematic consequences for the practitioners and patients of both source and recipient traditions. The paper begins by illustrating the historical continuity of this process by way of an example from India's colonial era.

Author(s): 
Naraindas, Harish
Publication Title: 
BMC pregnancy and childbirth

BACKGROUND: A longitudinal repeated measures design over pregnancy and post-birth, with a control group would provide insight into the mechanical adaptations of the body under conditions of changing load during a common female human lifespan condition, while minimizing the influences of inter human differences.

Author(s): 
Gilleard, Wendy L.
Publication Title: 
Physiological Reviews

The introduction of high-resolution time lapse imaging and molecular biological tools has changed dramatically the rate of progress towards the understanding of the complex structure-function relations in synapses of central spiny neurons. Standing issues, including the sequence of molecular and structural processes leading to formation, morphological change, and longevity of dendritic spines, as well as the functions of dendritic spines in neurological/psychiatric diseases are being addressed in a growing number of recent studies.

Author(s): 
Sala, Carlo
Segal, Menahem
Publication Title: 
Anesthesiology

BACKGROUND: Automatic control of depth of hypnosis using the Bispectral Index (BIS) can help to reduce phases of inadequate control. Automated BIS control with propofol or isoflurane administration via an infusion system has recently been described, a comparable study with isoflurane administration via a vaporizer had not been conducted yet. Our hypothesis was that our new model based closed-loop control system can safely be applied clinically and maintains the BIS within a defined target range better than manual control.

Author(s): 
Locher, Stephan
Stadler, Konrad S.
Boehlen, Thomas
Bouillon, Thomas
Leibundgut, Daniel
Schumacher, Peter M.
Wymann, Rolf
Zbinden, Alex M.
Publication Title: 
Journal of Neurosurgical Anesthesiology

We hypothesized that like bispectral index, entropy may be anesthetic agent specific. We carried out a study to assess the entropy values of different anesthetics at equi-minimal alveolar concentrations (MACs) with air and nitrous oxide as carrier gases. Thirty adult patients undergoing spine surgery were randomized to receive halothane, isoflurane, or sevoflurane, in 2 stages, (a) with air/oxygen mixture (2:1) and (b) in nitrous oxide/oxygen (2:1). Heart rate, mean arterial blood pressure, response entropy (RE), and state entropy (SE) were noted at 1.0 and 1.5 MACs for each agent.

Author(s): 
Prabhakar, Hemanshu
Ali, Zulfiqar
Bithal, Parmod K.
Singh, Gyaninder P.
Laithangbam, Pradip K.
Dash, Hari H.
Publication Title: 
Social Science & Medicine (1982)

The basic premise of the paper is that Western medicine's co-opting of specific technologies and materials from other (indigenous) medical traditions, stripped of the original theories underlying their use, has problematic consequences for the practitioners and patients of both source and recipient traditions. The paper begins by illustrating the historical continuity of this process by way of an example from India's colonial era.

Author(s): 
Naraindas, Harish
Publication Title: 
Journal of Alternative and Complementary Medicine (New York, N.Y.)

OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to compare the effect of a short-term intensive residential yoga program with physical exercise (control) on pain and spinal flexibility in subjects with chronic low-back pain (CLBP). DESIGN: This was a wait-list, randomized controlled study. SETTING: The study was conducted at a residential integrative health center in Bangalore, South India. SUBJECTS: Eighty (80) subjects (females, n = 37) with CLBP, who consented were randomly assigned to receive yoga or physical exercise if they satisfied the selection criteria.

Author(s): 
Tekur, Padmini
Singphow, Chametcha
Nagendra, Hongasandra Ramarao
Raghuram, Nagarathna
Publication Title: 
Pain Practice: The Official Journal of World Institute of Pain

OBJECTIVE: The objective of this report is to raise awareness of the effect of strenuous yoga flexion exercises on osteopenic or osteoporotic spines. We previously described subjects with known osteoporosis in whom vertebral compression fractures (VCFs) developed after spinal flexion exercise (SFE) and recommended that SFEs not be prescribed in patients with spinal osteoporosis. METHODS: This report describes 3 healthy persons with low bone mass and yoga-induced pain or fracture.

Author(s): 
Sinaki, Mehrsheed
Publication Title: 
Complementary Therapies in Medicine

INTRODUCTION: Previously, outpatient Yoga programs for patients with chronic low back pain (CLBP) lasting several months have been found to reduce pain, analgesic requirement and disability, and improve spinal mobility. This study evaluated changes in pain, anxiety, depression and spinal mobility for CLBP patients on short-term, residential Yoga and physical exercise programs, including comprehensive yoga lifestyle modifications.

Author(s): 
Tekur, P.
Nagarathna, R.
Chametcha, S.
Hankey, Alex
Nagendra, H. R.

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