Spirometry

Publication Title: 
AIDS patient care and STDs

The increased longevity afforded by combination antiretroviral therapy in developed countries has led to an increased concern regarding senescence-related diseases in patients with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. Previous epidemiologic analyses have demonstrated an increased risk of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, as well as a significant burden of respiratory symptoms in HIV-infected patients. We performed the St.

Author(s): 
Leung, Janice M.
Liu, Joseph C.
Mtambo, Andy
Ngan, David
Nashta, Negar
Guillemi, Silvia
Harris, Marianne
Lima, Viviane D.
Mattman, Andre
Shaipanich, Tawimas
Raju, Rekha
Hague, Cameron
Leipsic, Jonathon A.
Sin, Don D.
Montaner, Julio S.
Man, S. F. Paul
Publication Title: 
Anesthesiology

Resting end-expiratory position (REEP) of the respiratory system was monitored continuously using spirometric recording in eleven patients during transition from consciousness to thiopental hypnosis and following subsequent administration of succinylcholine. REEP decreased following thiopental and was little affected by subsequent relaxant in most patients. A fall in REEP was observed within 30 s after thiopental, and a lower, stable level of REEP was attained within approximately 15-45 s. Mean volume of gas expelled from the lungs was 189 (SE 32) ml BTPS.

Author(s): 
Bergman, N. A.
Publication Title: 
Pediatrics

INTRODUCTION: Hypnotherapy can be useful in the management of anxiety, discomfort, and psychosomatic symptoms, all of which may contribute to a complaint of dyspnea. Therefore, instruction in self-hypnosis was offered to 17 children and adolescents with chronic dyspnea, which had not resolved despite medical therapy, and who were documented to have normal lung function at rest. This report documents the result of this intervention.

Author(s): 
Anbar, R. D.
Publication Title: 
Allergy and Asthma Proceedings: The Official Journal of Regional and State Allergy Societies

Adult asthmatics, ranging from 19 to 52 years from an asthma and allergy clinic in a university setting volunteered to participate in the study. The 17 students were randomly divided into yoga (9 subjects) and nonyoga control (8 subjects) groups. The yoga group was taught a set of breathing and relaxation techniques including breath slowing exercises (pranayama), physical postures (yogasanas), and meditation. Yoga techniques were taught at the university health center, three times a week for 16 weeks.

Author(s): 
Vedanthan, P. K.
Kesavalu, L. N.
Murthy, K. C.
Duvall, K.
Hall, M. J.
Baker, S.
Nagarathna, S.
Publication Title: 
Allergy and Asthma Proceedings: The Official Journal of Regional and State Allergy Societies

Adult asthmatics, ranging from 19 to 52 years from an asthma and allergy clinic in a university setting volunteered to participate in the study. The 17 students were randomly divided into yoga (9 subjects) and nonyoga control (8 subjects) groups. The yoga group was taught a set of breathing and relaxation techniques including breath slowing exercises (pranayama), physical postures (yogasanas), and meditation. Yoga techniques were taught at the university health center, three times a week for 16 weeks.

Author(s): 
Vedanthan, P. K.
Kesavalu, L. N.
Murthy, K. C.
Duvall, K.
Hall, M. J.
Baker, S.
Nagarathna, S.
Publication Title: 
Alternative Therapies in Health and Medicine

CONTEXT: The vital capacity of the lungs is a critical component of good health. Vital capacity is an important concern for those with asthma, heart conditions, and lung ailments; those who smoke; and those who have no known lung problems. OBJECTIVE: To determine the effects of yoga postures and breathing exercises on vital capacity. DESIGN: Using the Spiropet spirometer, researchers measured vital capacity. Vital capacity determinants were taken near the beginning and end of two 17-week semesters. No control group was used.

Author(s): 
Birkel, D. A.
Edgren, L.
Publication Title: 
Przegla̧d Lekarski

In 70 children with mild idiopathic scoliosis I degree by the method of Cobb, participating in two or several rehabilitation camps, and in the control group of 22 healthy children ventilatory lung parameters: vital capacity--FVC, FVC%pred., Maximal forced expiratory volume one sec.--FEV1, FEV1%pred., FEV1% FVC, and Maximal Mid Expiratory Flow--MMEF, MMEF%pred. and Maximal Voluntary Ventilation--MVV were determined. Tests were carried out with use of the Vitalograph and Jaeger Spirometer after several four-week rehabilitation camps.

Author(s): 
Zaba, Ryszard
Publication Title: 
Jornal Brasileiro De Pneumologia: Publicaça̋o Oficial Da Sociedade Brasileira De Pneumologia E Tisilogia

OBJECTIVE: To clarify whether, in healthy individuals, practicing yoga can modify maximal inspiratory pressure and spirometric indices when compared with the practice of aerobic exercise. MEYHODS: A controlled clinical trial. A total of 31 healthy volunteers were allocated to practice aerobic exercise (n = 15) or to practice yoga (n = 16). Those in the first group served as controls and engaged in aerobic exercise for 45-60 minutes, twice a week for three months. Those in the second group practiced selected yogic techniques, also in sessions of 45-60 minutes, twice a week for three months.

Author(s): 
de Godoy, Dagoberto Vanoni
Bringhenti, Raquel Longhi
Severa, Andréa
de Gasperi, Ricardo
Poli, Leonardo Vieira
Publication Title: 
Alternative Therapies in Health and Medicine

BACKGROUND: Some studies have shown the beneficial effects of yoga for individuals with bronchial hyperreactivity with regard to (1) a reduction in the use of rescue medication, (2) an increase in exercise capacity, and (3) an improvement in lung function. Despite the fact that yoga is promising as a new treatment for pediatric patients, further studies are needed to assess the use of this training for asthma management. OBJECTIVE: This study was performed to assess the beneficial effects of yoga in exercise-induced bronchoconstriction (EIB) in children.

Author(s): 
Tahan, Fulya
Eke Gungor, Hatice
Bicici, Emine
Publication Title: 
Respiratory Research

BACKGROUND: Clinical studies of the associations of vitamin E with lung function have reported conflicting results. However, these reports primarily examine the α-tocopherol isoform of vitamin E and have not included the isoform γ-tocopherol which we recently demonstrated in vitro opposes the function of α-tocopherol. We previously demonstrated, in vitro and in animal studies, that the vitamin E isoform α-tocopherol protects, but the isoform γ-tocopherol promotes lung inflammation and airway hyperresponsiveness.

Author(s): 
Marchese, Michelle E.
Kumar, Rajesh
Colangelo, Laura A.
Avila, Pedro C.
Jacobs, David R.
Gross, Myron
Sood, Akshay
Liu, Kiang
Cook-Mills, Joan M.

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